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United States Foreign Policy Panama

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NEWS
February 27, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
By playing sidelines cheerleader in the bout between Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega and his democratic foes, U.S. officials said Friday, the White House is using a plan that worked spectacularly in the Philippines and somewhat less well in Haiti. Whether it will now succeed in breaking Noriega's hold on Panama and returning democratic rule is an open question, but also an academic one, they said.
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NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not so long ago, in the wake of the American overthrow of dictator Manuel A. Noriega, being associated with the United States was a Panamanian political badge of honor. Today, to some, it's grounds for impeachment. The street peddlers who once waved down motorists with fast-selling T-shirts celebrating Operation Just Cause, as the December, 1989, invasion was called, have traded pro-U.S. souvenirs for bananas, oranges and Korean toys.
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NEWS
April 24, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
With Panama's economy a shambles and Gen. Manuel A. Noriega holding tenaciously to power, the United States is being forced to reconsider its hard-line conditions for Noriega's ouster, U.S. officials here say. No more than two weeks ago, the officials described the goals of American pressure on Panama as getting Noriega "out of uniform and out of the hemisphere." Now, the goal is expressed vaguely: "All options are on the table," said a knowledgeable U.S. official here. Another U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American diplomats, hoping to foster a climate of warmer relations between Washington and Moscow, began keeping Soviet officials closely advised of the course of events in Panama days before the incursion and continue to brief Kremlin officials several times daily, U.S. sources in Moscow said Friday.
NEWS
May 4, 1988
Panama's banks, closed for two months by a U.S.-engineered cash freeze aimed at ousting military strongman Manuel A. Noriega, will be ordered to reopen on Monday for cash withdrawals, state-run television said. The measure was another step in Noriega's strategy to fight back against U.S. pressure, but economists said some smaller banks do not have enough cash and fear they could go out of business if forced to reopen.
NEWS
May 10, 1988
Banks in Panama began doling out small amounts of cash to customers for the first time since a political and economic crisis forced the banking system to close nine weeks ago. But the predicted large crowds of anxious customers failed to materialize; there were only short, orderly lines outside a few downtown banks. The government, which closed the banks March 3, last week said the institutions could reopen under tight new regulations allowing withdrawals of only 25% from checking accounts.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
More than a week of spectacular American military maneuvers, fruitless political negotiations and a shift of U.S. policy has failed again to break the will of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, Panama's military ruler. He remains in full control with no indication that he will give up power. "There are no signs of any progress," a diplomatic source said in a telephone interview over the weekend. "There is no reason for optimism" in the effort to drive Noriega from power.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | Associated Press
Excerpts from President Bush's news conference Thursday. On Noriega Q: Mr. President, one of your major objectives was to get Noriega. Are you frustrated that he got away? How long will you keep on chasing him? And are you confident that you'll get him? A: I've been frustrated that he's been in power this long--extraordinarily frustrated. The good news: He's out of power. The bad news: He has not yet been brought to justice. So I'd have to say . . .
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States eventually may come to regret President Bush's decision to invade Panama, several specialists on American foreign policy predicted Thursday. For all the benefits of ousting strongman Manuel A. Noriega, these experts argue, the long-term consequences could also include more casualties from a protracted guerrilla war; expenses running into millions of dollars for a U.S. occupation force; loss of credibility in Latin America, and growing mistrust of how U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Democratic front-runner Michael S. Dukakis, returning to the presidential campaign trail after a brief hiatus caused by his wife's surgery, stepped up his attack Saturday on the Reagan Administration's policies toward Panama, suggesting that Administration clumsiness had destroyed efforts by Latin American leaders to depose strongman Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escalating its protest of the U.S. invasion of Panama, Peru delivered a blow to the Bush Administration's anti-drug strategy Friday by pulling out of programs to find and destroy cocaine laboratories in the Andes. An Administration official said that President Alan Garcia's government broke off the $10-million-a-year U.S.-Peruvian program one day after it called for cancellation of a planned Andean summit conference on drugs.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Crying and pulling at her hair, a woman in high heels picked her way through mobs of looters on the crowded Via Espana. "They put a gun to my head and stole my car!" she shrieked. Around the corner at a neighborhood grocery store, a businessman, frantic and frightened, drew a revolver from his pocket. "I've never used one of these in my life," he muttered, "but we are protecting our building."
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | Associated Press
Excerpts from President Bush's news conference Thursday. On Noriega Q: Mr. President, one of your major objectives was to get Noriega. Are you frustrated that he got away? How long will you keep on chasing him? And are you confident that you'll get him? A: I've been frustrated that he's been in power this long--extraordinarily frustrated. The good news: He's out of power. The bad news: He has not yet been brought to justice. So I'd have to say . . .
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States eventually may come to regret President Bush's decision to invade Panama, several specialists on American foreign policy predicted Thursday. For all the benefits of ousting strongman Manuel A. Noriega, these experts argue, the long-term consequences could also include more casualties from a protracted guerrilla war; expenses running into millions of dollars for a U.S. occupation force; loss of credibility in Latin America, and growing mistrust of how U.S.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With Marine riflemen, Army paratroopers and Navy SEALS already moving through the darkness toward Panama, President Bush went over the final invasion plans one last time Tuesday night. At 4 a.m. Wednesday, he was still awake in his White House study when aides came to suggest an early morning televised address to the nation. Reports of substantial casualties on both sides were pouring in, and Bush was eager to explain his decision to send U.S.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santiago Torrijos, a former Panamanian consul general in Los Angeles, has every reason to loathe Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and wish for his downfall. Torrijos' uncle, Gen. Omar Torrijos, Panama's previous leader, was killed in a suspicious airplane crash in July, 1981, four years after he signed the Panama Canal Treaties with President Jimmy Carter. Noriega has been suspected of plotting Gen. Torrijos' death. And last Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1989
Authorities arrested 118 demonstrators Wednesday for blocking entrances to the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles in a protest over U.S. policies in El Salvador. The protest, which attracted about 400 people, was the fifth and largest of weekly demonstrations staged locally since six Jesuit priests were slain in El Salvador in November. Along with denouncing U.S. support of the Salvadoran government, the protesters also criticized this week's U.S. military action against Panama.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American diplomats, hoping to foster a climate of warmer relations between Washington and Moscow, began keeping Soviet officials closely advised of the course of events in Panama days before the incursion and continue to brief Kremlin officials several times daily, U.S. sources in Moscow said Friday.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | ART PINE and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With hostilities in Panama winding down, the Bush Administration began moving Thursday to help Panama's fledgling leadership establish a government and map plans for rebuilding the country's shattered economy. President Bush said the United States wants to see a major restructuring of the Panama Defense Forces and will soon propose increased economic aid for the government of newly installed President Guillermo Endara. Bush told reporters Thursday that the United States is "helping Mr.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peru, a key ally in the war on drugs, called Thursday for cancellation of the upcoming Andean summit conference on drugs, a signal that Latin America's displeasure over the U.S. invasion of Panama has emerged as a serious threat to President Bush's anti-narcotics campaign. U.S. drug fighters officially maintained a stiff upper lip, saying that it is too early to speculate about adverse side effects that the U.S. move into Panama may have on their efforts.
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