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United States Foreign Policy Poland

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July 8, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
When President Bush visits Poland and Hungary next week, U.S. officials expect him to step into a warm and welcoming flood of pro-American sentiment. Despite 40 years of Communist rule, Poles and Hungarians long have yearned to be part of the West, and they have traditionally greeted U.S. officials with adulation. But when Bush begins to speak, the cheers may quickly fade.
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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered an end to the 20-year-old arms embargo on Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary on Friday, opening the way for U.S. sales of military equipment to the former Warsaw Pact countries. The action came after senior Administration officials determined that the Soviet Union could no longer guarantee those nations' defense needs, U.S. officials said. The officials said the Administration did not yet plan to send high-tech weapons to the Soviet Union's former allies.
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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush ordered an end to the 20-year-old arms embargo on Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary on Friday, opening the way for U.S. sales of military equipment to the former Warsaw Pact countries. The action came after senior Administration officials determined that the Soviet Union could no longer guarantee those nations' defense needs, U.S. officials said. The officials said the Administration did not yet plan to send high-tech weapons to the Soviet Union's former allies.
NEWS
July 8, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
When President Bush visits Poland and Hungary next week, U.S. officials expect him to step into a warm and welcoming flood of pro-American sentiment. Despite 40 years of Communist rule, Poles and Hungarians long have yearned to be part of the West, and they have traditionally greeted U.S. officials with adulation. But when Bush begins to speak, the cheers may quickly fade.
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