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United States Foreign Policy Serbia

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NEWS
July 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Monday launched a scathing assault on Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton's foreign policy credentials as President Bush told voters that no issue in this election year would matter more than trust. The attack, a major escalation of a White House effort to question the character and competence of the Democratic ticket, came as Clinton and running mate Al Gore began to challenge Bush's foreign policy leadership.
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NEWS
November 29, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States has agreed to a European proposal that would allow Bosnia's Serbs a major victory if they accept the pending allied peace plan, U.S. and U.N. officials said Monday. Under the proposal, the Serbian rebels would be permitted to form a federation with neighboring Yugoslavia, enhancing their prospects for achieving a Greater Serbia.
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NEWS
August 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, predicting that the civil war in shattered Yugoslavia will be a long one, told Serbia on Thursday that the United States will never recognize its seizure of territory in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia. Eagleburger, a former U.S.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 200 U.S. warplanes and the aircraft carriers Nimitz and Theodore Roosevelt awaited orders Friday as President Clinton prepared for a decision today on whether to launch allied air strikes against rebel Serbian forces in an effort to end the bloodshed in Bosnia. Although the Defense Department stopped short of actually placing U.S.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 200 U.S. warplanes and the aircraft carriers Nimitz and Theodore Roosevelt awaited orders Friday as President Clinton prepared for a decision today on whether to launch allied air strikes against rebel Serbian forces in an effort to end the bloodshed in Bosnia. Although the Defense Department stopped short of actually placing U.S.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Clinton, sounding more like a President-in-office than a President-elect, sent up a flurry of crisp foreign policy signals on Thursday, urging Serbs to vote their hard-line government out of office and saying he would wait for U.N. endorsement before deploying U.S. warplanes over Bosnia-Herzegovina. Discarding any remaining reticence about speaking out on foreign affairs, Clinton also asked Israel to halt its mass expulsion of Palestinians, assured Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States has agreed to a European proposal that would allow Bosnia's Serbs a major victory if they accept the pending allied peace plan, U.S. and U.N. officials said Monday. Under the proposal, the Serbian rebels would be permitted to form a federation with neighboring Yugoslavia, enhancing their prospects for achieving a Greater Serbia.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they await word from Washington that could send them to war, can-do Yankee confidence and a television-reinforced sense of disconnection share the cockpit with young Americans patrolling the skies over tormented Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton nears a decision today on what measures to take to force the Serbs to halt their campaign of "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia-Herzegovina, one major question looms: How will the Serbs react to what Washington and its allies decide? The issue is critical. Experts point out that the Serbs have come to view themselves as martyrs and are determined to face down enemies.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If agony in high places is any measure, the war in Bosnia is already President Clinton's Vietnam. The President says that it is the issue he cannot stop worrying about at the end of the day; he takes the problem home at night and hashes it over with his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. The tragedy in the Balkans is "not only heartbreaking," he said this week, "it's infuriating." And Secretary of State Warren Christopher, a notably unemotional man, throws up his hands at the subject.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they await word from Washington that could send them to war, can-do Yankee confidence and a television-reinforced sense of disconnection share the cockpit with young Americans patrolling the skies over tormented Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
May 1, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Clinton nears a decision today on what measures to take to force the Serbs to halt their campaign of "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia-Herzegovina, one major question looms: How will the Serbs react to what Washington and its allies decide? The issue is critical. Experts point out that the Serbs have come to view themselves as martyrs and are determined to face down enemies.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If agony in high places is any measure, the war in Bosnia is already President Clinton's Vietnam. The President says that it is the issue he cannot stop worrying about at the end of the day; he takes the problem home at night and hashes it over with his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. The tragedy in the Balkans is "not only heartbreaking," he said this week, "it's infuriating." And Secretary of State Warren Christopher, a notably unemotional man, throws up his hands at the subject.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top Air Force general broke ranks Wednesday with other high-level military leaders over the dangers of air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, asserting that U.S. planes could attack Serbian forces with "virtually no risk" to American pilots. The assessment by Gen. Merrill A.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration warned Serbia on Monday against widening the conflict in Bosnia and hinted that the United States is ready to use military force if Belgrade provokes new fighting in Kosovo, the Serbian province that is inhabited mainly by ethnic Albanians. Administration officials essentially confirmed that President Bush formally warned Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic in a letter last week that in case of such an escalation, U.S.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Clinton, sounding more like a President-in-office than a President-elect, sent up a flurry of crisp foreign policy signals on Thursday, urging Serbs to vote their hard-line government out of office and saying he would wait for U.N. endorsement before deploying U.S. warplanes over Bosnia-Herzegovina. Discarding any remaining reticence about speaking out on foreign affairs, Clinton also asked Israel to halt its mass expulsion of Palestinians, assured Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's top Air Force general broke ranks Wednesday with other high-level military leaders over the dangers of air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, asserting that U.S. planes could attack Serbian forces with "virtually no risk" to American pilots. The assessment by Gen. Merrill A.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration warned Serbia on Monday against widening the conflict in Bosnia and hinted that the United States is ready to use military force if Belgrade provokes new fighting in Kosovo, the Serbian province that is inhabited mainly by ethnic Albanians. Administration officials essentially confirmed that President Bush formally warned Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic in a letter last week that in case of such an escalation, U.S.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, predicting that the civil war in shattered Yugoslavia will be a long one, told Serbia on Thursday that the United States will never recognize its seizure of territory in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia. Eagleburger, a former U.S.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Monday launched a scathing assault on Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton's foreign policy credentials as President Bush told voters that no issue in this election year would matter more than trust. The attack, a major escalation of a White House effort to question the character and competence of the Democratic ticket, came as Clinton and running mate Al Gore began to challenge Bush's foreign policy leadership.
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