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United States Foreign Policy Somalia

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January 18, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Far beneath the surface of the tragic drama of Somalia, four major U.S. oil companies are quietly sitting on a prospective fortune in exclusive concessions to explore and exploit tens of millions of acres of the Somali countryside. That land, in the opinion of geologists and industry sources, could yield significant amounts of oil and natural gas if the U.S.-led military mission can restore peace to the impoverished East African nation.
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NEWS
March 10, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the last U.S. troops packing up to leave Somalia in the next few days, President Clinton on Wednesday said that the United States did more than could be expected there, even if competing warlords soon plunge the country back into starvation and chaos. Talking to reporters at the White House, Clinton said Somalia is now the responsibility of factional leaders whose disputes produced a man-made famine two years ago. He urged them to be more responsible.
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NEWS
March 7, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Marine sniper team peered through gun sights atop the Empire State merchant ship Sunday afternoon, scanning the horizon of a city slipping deeper into chaos by the day, as 277 American soldiers flanked by the high-powered cannons of two Bradley fighting vehicles quietly marched up the gangplank. On Tuesday, another ship will dock at Mogadishu's seaport, the Greek cruise ship Mediterranean Sky. Also amid strict security, more than 500 U.S.
NEWS
March 7, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Marine sniper team peered through gun sights atop the Empire State merchant ship Sunday afternoon, scanning the horizon of a city slipping deeper into chaos by the day, as 277 American soldiers flanked by the high-powered cannons of two Bradley fighting vehicles quietly marched up the gangplank. On Tuesday, another ship will dock at Mogadishu's seaport, the Greek cruise ship Mediterranean Sky. Also amid strict security, more than 500 U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest single loss of American life since the international community went to Somalia's rescue last December, four U.S. soldiers died Sunday when gunmen ambushed a U.N. peacekeeping convoy in Mogadishu. President Clinton pledged to take "appropriate action" against those responsible. The soldiers were killed when their vehicle hit a land mine in southern Mogadishu and the convoy in which they were riding came under attack.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marines clashed with Somali civilians Monday in what some officials said could be a harbinger of the worst possible ending to the U.S. intervention in the East African country: the prospect of a series of last-minute attacks as American troops withdraw. The incident in Mogadishu, the Somali capital, came as U.S. forces began the final phase of their promised March 31 pullout.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the last U.S. troops packing up to leave Somalia in the next few days, President Clinton on Wednesday said that the United States did more than could be expected there, even if competing warlords soon plunge the country back into starvation and chaos. Talking to reporters at the White House, Clinton said Somalia is now the responsibility of factional leaders whose disputes produced a man-made famine two years ago. He urged them to be more responsible.
NEWS
December 5, 1992
Here is the text of President Bush's address Friday on the mobilization of U.S. troops to Somalia: I want to talk to you today about the tragedy in Somalia and about a mission that can ease suffering and save lives. Every American has seen the shocking images from Somalia. The scope of suffering there is hard to imagine. Already over a quarter-million people, as many people as live in Buffalo, N.Y., have died in the Somali famine.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of an influential African-American think tank called on the Clinton Administration on Thursday to "stay the course" in Somalia and reject growing demands from Capitol Hill for a hasty withdrawal of U.S. forces from the troubled African nation. At a press conference that marked the emergence of a potentially powerful constituency in support of American military involvement in Somalia, Randall Robinson, executive director of TransAfrica, said that the sudden removal of U.S.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, haunted by ghosts of past foreign policy debacles from Vietnam to Beirut, faced a series of agonizing choices on Somalia on Wednesday--and found, to his chagrin, that all of them looked bad. His critics in Congress called for an immediate withdrawal from the battle zone in the Horn of Africa. But his advisers said that would leave Somalia in ruins and shatter the Administration's credibility abroad.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Marines clashed with Somali civilians Monday in what some officials said could be a harbinger of the worst possible ending to the U.S. intervention in the East African country: the prospect of a series of last-minute attacks as American troops withdraw. The incident in Mogadishu, the Somali capital, came as U.S. forces began the final phase of their promised March 31 pullout.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stripped to their shorts, their faces smeared with sun block, the crack commandos of the U.S. Army's 75th Ranger Regiment spent the last day of their ill-fated mission in Somalia on Wednesday locked in fierce combat--on the volleyball court. Then, before the sweat dried, the first 100 quietly packed their bags, had a last look around and prepared to board a C-5 Galaxy for home today in a departure with no ceremony.
NEWS
October 19, 1993 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Much of the nation's military is fuming at the Clinton Administration once again, this time over the performance of the President and his top national security advisers in setting policy on U.S. intervention in Somalia and Haiti.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | From Reuters
Text of President Clinton's address from the Oval Office on U.S. policy in Somalia: My fellow Americans, today I want to talk with you about our nation's military involvement in Somalia. A year ago, we all watched with horror as Somali children and their families lay dying by the tens of thousands, dying the slow, agonizing death of starvation, a starvation brought on not only by drought, but also by the anarchy that then prevailed in that country.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, haunted by ghosts of past foreign policy debacles from Vietnam to Beirut, faced a series of agonizing choices on Somalia on Wednesday--and found, to his chagrin, that all of them looked bad. His critics in Congress called for an immediate withdrawal from the battle zone in the Horn of Africa. But his advisers said that would leave Somalia in ruins and shatter the Administration's credibility abroad.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, resisting a cascade of calls for an immediate exit from Somalia, has decided to send 2,000 more U.S. combat troops and dozens of armored vehicles to the East African nation and also plans a political initiative, Administration officials said Wednesday. The reinforcements--designed to restore order, rescue American captives and cover the eventual retreat of U.S.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind the walls of the Arkansas governor's mansion, Bill Clinton acted the part of President-to-be Friday as the United States set into motion a military operation that will loom large in the initial months of his presidency. Clinton was briefed on the Somali mission by a high-level Pentagon team and consulted with congressional officials and other advisers about the precedent-setting venture.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | ART PINE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration said Thursday it is "gravely concerned" about efforts by Somali warlords to block distribution of food aid in famine-plagued Somalia and has offered to send up to 30,000 U.S. troops to help guarantee that supplies reach the starving. The troop offer, broached to the United Nations on Wednesday by acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, awaits a response from U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton ordered new U.S. troops and weapons to Somalia on Monday in the wake of a bloody military operation Sunday that left 12 Americans dead, 78 wounded and at least six held hostage. The casualty figures, more than double what officials had estimated only a day earlier--and the fact that some U.S. service personnel have been taken hostage--marked a major escalation in the military confrontation in Somalia and seriously threaten Clinton's policy there.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton said Tuesday that he wants to set a "date certain" for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Somalia and added that the problems of that peacekeeping operation have made him more cautious about sending a similar force to Bosnia-Herzegovina. Clinton did not set a deadline for ending the 10-month-old mission in Somalia but he said that he wants the operation to focus on "a political strategy" that will allow U.S. and other foreign troops to leave.
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