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United States Foreign Policy South Africa

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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While President Bush joined other U.S. leaders Saturday in hailing the imminent release of black activist Nelson R. Mandela, a political storm already was brewing over whether the move warrants relaxation of U.S. sanctions against South Africa. From his retreat at Camp David, Bush telephoned South African President Frederik W. de Klerk and "pledged U.S. willingness to help create a climate for negotiations" between the nation's white minority leadership and its black majority.
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NEWS
October 13, 1996 | BOB DROGIN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
To hear U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher tell it, few nations are as important to Washington and the post-Cold War world as post-apartheid South Africa. "When I look around the world, I see very few countries with greater potential to help shape the 21st century than the new South Africa," Christopher said Saturday in a wide-ranging speech here. "I see few relationships as vital to advancing our common interests as the U.S.-South African relationship."
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NEWS
June 7, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson, drawing his first line in the political sand of this summer's Democratic convention, warned Monday that unless the party's likely nominee agrees to declare South Africa a terrorist state, "we'll meet each other on the floor in Atlanta." Jackson complained during a radio news conference in Los Angeles that Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis has been "too cautious" in his reluctance to make such a declaration, which would carry stiff economic and diplomatic sanctions.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As soon as South Africa sets a date for free multiracial elections and establishes a transitional council, the United States will take steps to help the onetime outcast nation rejoin the international economy, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Friday. "South Africa's successful transition is important for Africa, the United States and the world," Christopher said in a speech outlining the Clinton Administration's post-Cold War policy in Africa.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Accusing South Africa of sponsoring "terrorism" and engaging in "blatant aggression" against its neighbors, Michael S. Dukakis said Monday that if elected President he "would not rule out" giving military aid to the "front-line" states bordering the white-ruled nation.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson on Friday escalated his attack on Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, saying the Democratic front-runner is further to the right than President Reagan and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in at least one aspect of foreign policy. Jackson charged that Dukakis opposes sending military aid to Mozambique's Marxist government--assistance that even Reagan favors.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
More than 550 demonstrators--including several familiar figures from the anti-war movement of the 1960s--were arrested Monday as they tried to block entrances to CIA headquarters in a five-hour protest against Reagan Administration policies in Central America and southern Africa. Among those arrested in the nonviolent protest, which began before dawn at the agency's headquarters in suburban Langley, Va.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The American Embassy here will celebrate the Fourth of July this year with a big cookout in the ambassador's backyard. In a bit of preventive diplomacy, however, the ambassador says no speeches will be allowed, though toasts will be encouraged. One party planner suggested that the public address system should have a cutoff switch, just in case. He was joking--sort of.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While President Bush joined other U.S. leaders Saturday in hailing the imminent release of black activist Nelson R. Mandela, a political storm already was brewing over whether the move warrants relaxation of U.S. sanctions against South Africa. From his retreat at Camp David, Bush telephoned South African President Frederik W. de Klerk and "pledged U.S. willingness to help create a climate for negotiations" between the nation's white minority leadership and its black majority.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. congressional delegation said government reforms in South Africa have failed to address black voting rights. They recommended that U.S. economic sanctions remain in place or even be toughened. The three-member group, led by Rep. Howard Wolpe (D-Mich.), acknowledged "some positive developments" since President Frederik W. de Klerk assumed power in August. But, the delegation added after a five-day visit, "we could find no evidence that the government . . .
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Accusing South Africa of sponsoring "terrorism" and engaging in "blatant aggression" against its neighbors, Michael S. Dukakis said Monday that if elected President he "would not rule out" giving military aid to the "front-line" states bordering the white-ruled nation.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Taking a break from the road to campaign from his formal offices here, Vice President George Bush said Monday he believes South Africa is a "racist state"--but he affirmed his support for continuing diplomatic relations between the United States and Pretoria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Seventy-nine religious and labor leaders have summoned a round of marches, rallies and other activities this weekend to protest U.S. policies in Central America and Southern Africa. A sponsoring coalition, the "National Mobilization for Justice and Peace" says "tens of thousands" will participate in a rally at the Capitol today, with interfaith services Sunday, followed by visits to Congress members Monday.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. congressional delegation said government reforms in South Africa have failed to address black voting rights. They recommended that U.S. economic sanctions remain in place or even be toughened. The three-member group, led by Rep. Howard Wolpe (D-Mich.), acknowledged "some positive developments" since President Frederik W. de Klerk assumed power in August. But, the delegation added after a five-day visit, "we could find no evidence that the government . . .
NEWS
June 13, 1988 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
The Democratic Party platform committee concluded a three-day meeting here Sunday in a harmonious mood but facing a significant new disagreement over defense spending and with much of its work yet undone. At the center of controversy was a proposal by forces backing the Rev. Jesse Jackson to cut or at least freeze Pentagon expenditures. Forces backing the party's prospective nominee, Michael S.
NEWS
June 7, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson, drawing his first line in the political sand of this summer's Democratic convention, warned Monday that unless the party's likely nominee agrees to declare South Africa a terrorist state, "we'll meet each other on the floor in Atlanta." Jackson complained during a radio news conference in Los Angeles that Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis has been "too cautious" in his reluctance to make such a declaration, which would carry stiff economic and diplomatic sanctions.
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