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United States Foreign Policy South Korea

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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
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NEWS
November 23, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heightened tension with North Korea during President Clinton's just-concluded trip to Seoul has obscured a key economic point: The administration has a huge interest in South Korea's successful turnaround in order to justify its policies in crisis-hit Asia. More than any other country in the region, and certainly more than Japan, South Korea has been a model from the U.S. perspective.
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NEWS
December 8, 1987 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writers
Amid indications that the ruling party's candidate is falling behind, a U.S. diplomat reiterated Monday that the United States is opposed to any intervention by South Korea's armed forces in the presidential election scheduled for Dec. 16. The diplomat's statement, made on condition that he not be identified by name, was the second such warning in a week. "We believe the election process should be culminated according to procedures," the diplomat said.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years of famine and an unraveling economy are driving North Korea out of self-imposed isolation and pushing the Communist regime to engage the outside world, senior U.S. officials said Saturday. On a 24-hour visit to South Korea, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright also suggested that the North's economic suffering finally could nudge Pyongyang into talks with the South to formally end the 47-year-old Korean War and reunite the divided country.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years of famine and an unraveling economy are driving North Korea out of self-imposed isolation and pushing the Communist regime to engage the outside world, senior U.S. officials said Saturday. On a 24-hour visit to South Korea, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright also suggested that the North's economic suffering finally could nudge Pyongyang into talks with the South to formally end the 47-year-old Korean War and reunite the divided country.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The United States government rarely moves against its allies who flagrantly violate the rights of workers in their countries. So it came as a shock when the government wisely gave in to pressure recently and stopped promoting U.S. investments in South Korea because of blatant repression of workers there. But the opposite side of U.S. policy is evident in countries such as El Salvador, where our government is helping to finance an advertising campaign to persuade U.S.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan said Thursday that the United States will withdraw its troops from South Korea if tension eases on the divided Korean Peninsula, but the Administration's top expert on Asia said later that U.S. forces will remain there for the foreseeable future because Communist North Korea continues to threaten its neighbor. Reagan, after a meeting at the White House with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo, told reporters that a U.S.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heightened tension with North Korea during President Clinton's just-concluded trip to Seoul has obscured a key economic point: The administration has a huge interest in South Korea's successful turnaround in order to justify its policies in crisis-hit Asia. More than any other country in the region, and certainly more than Japan, South Korea has been a model from the U.S. perspective.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
The United States government rarely moves against its allies who flagrantly violate the rights of workers in their countries. So it came as a shock when the government wisely gave in to pressure recently and stopped promoting U.S. investments in South Korea because of blatant repression of workers there. But the opposite side of U.S. policy is evident in countries such as El Salvador, where our government is helping to finance an advertising campaign to persuade U.S.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan said Thursday that the United States will withdraw its troops from South Korea if tension eases on the divided Korean Peninsula, but the Administration's top expert on Asia said later that U.S. forces will remain there for the foreseeable future because Communist North Korea continues to threaten its neighbor. Reagan, after a meeting at the White House with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo, told reporters that a U.S.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writers
Amid indications that the ruling party's candidate is falling behind, a U.S. diplomat reiterated Monday that the United States is opposed to any intervention by South Korea's armed forces in the presidential election scheduled for Dec. 16. The diplomat's statement, made on condition that he not be identified by name, was the second such warning in a week. "We believe the election process should be culminated according to procedures," the diplomat said.
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