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United States Foreign Policy Taiwan

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NEWS
October 10, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking change seemed to come from nowhere. Three months ago, Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui ushered in an era of heightened confrontation in East Asia by redefining Taiwan's relationship to China as that of one state to another. His statement--which he refused to retract and was scheduled to repeat in a National Day address early today--raised the possibility of military action by China, which claims Taiwan as part of its own territory.
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NEWS
April 22, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, as the Clinton administration was trying to decide what weapon systems to sell to Taiwan, it suddenly found itself under intense pressure from one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) wanted the White House to let Taiwan buy advanced Aegis radar systems mounted on Arleigh Burke destroyers. And he wanted two of those warships to be built at Litton-Ingalls' shipyards in his hometown of Pascagoula, Miss.
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NEWS
August 11, 2000 | JACK NELSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key House Republicans and Democrats, defying Clinton administration policy, plan to meet with newly elected President Chen Shui-bian of Taiwan when he visits Los Angeles on Sunday on the eve of the Democratic National Convention. Rep.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | JACK NELSON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key House Republicans and Democrats, defying Clinton administration policy, plan to meet with newly elected President Chen Shui-bian of Taiwan when he visits Los Angeles on Sunday on the eve of the Democratic National Convention. Rep.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is preparing policy changes that will give the government of Taiwan greater leeway in dealing with the United States than it has had for 15 years, Administration officials say. The changes, which await final approval by President Clinton and could be announced in the next couple of weeks, would ease some restrictions imposed on Taiwan when the United States established diplomatic relations with its enemy, the People's Republic of China.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher and Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen on Tuesday began to thaw the recent freeze in U.S.-China relations, avoiding rhetoric and working toward a modest improvement in contacts between the two countries. The two officials talked for 90 minutes in a spacious conference center here in a session both sides characterized in cautiously positive terms.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed, at the time, like a minor contretemps in an out-of-the-way location. Yet when Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui's plane touched down in Honolulu on May 4, 1994, it ended the sleepy peace that had prevailed for more than a decade between the United States and China over the island of Taiwan. Lee, furious because the Clinton administration had refused to let him spend a night on American soil, sat fuming inside the Taiwan-owned Boeing 747.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Taiwan's National Day--Oct. 10, 1985--and the Nationalist government was celebrating the annual holiday with a rally and parade in which goose-stepping troops marched through Taipei's Presidential Square. As usual, the U.S. government was conspicuously absent.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of mounting tensions, the United States and China took small steps back from the brink of confrontation Thursday, exchanging conciliatory words but stopping well short of what the other side wanted on the two main irritants in their relationship.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government has warned top Boeing Co. executives that U.S. business will be punished if the United States fails to address concerns that it is straying from its longstanding policy of recognizing Beijing as the only legitimate government of China. The warning is the strongest evidence to date that China may be retaliating against U.S. companies because of anger over the Clinton Administration's recent decision to allow Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui to visit the United States.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking change seemed to come from nowhere. Three months ago, Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui ushered in an era of heightened confrontation in East Asia by redefining Taiwan's relationship to China as that of one state to another. His statement--which he refused to retract and was scheduled to repeat in a National Day address early today--raised the possibility of military action by China, which claims Taiwan as part of its own territory.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past three years, the Clinton administration has quietly forged an extensive military relationship with Taiwan, authorizing the Pentagon to conduct the kind of strategic dialogue with Taiwan's armed forces that had not been permitted by any previous administration since 1979, according to U.S. and Taiwanese sources.
NEWS
April 4, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After Vice President Al Gore and House Speaker Newt Gingrich played good cop-bad cop for China's leadership in successive visits here, a government spokesman Thursday chided the United States for speaking with "two voices" regarding the sensitive issue of Taiwan. "We have discovered the talk of some leaders on the U.S. side, including leaders of Congress, is contradictory," Foreign Ministry spokesman Shen Guofang said during a regularly scheduled news briefing here.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed an unexceptional moment when Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) spoke against a resolution last year to overturn 17 years of American policy and allow Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui to make an unofficial visit to the United States. Johnston, reflecting long-standing U.S. policy that there is only one China and that its capital is Beijing, warned that Lee's visit, which was strongly opposed by the Clinton administration, risked damaging relations with China.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed, at the time, like a minor contretemps in an out-of-the-way location. Yet when Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui's plane touched down in Honolulu on May 4, 1994, it ended the sleepy peace that had prevailed for more than a decade between the United States and China over the island of Taiwan. Lee, furious because the Clinton administration had refused to let him spend a night on American soil, sat fuming inside the Taiwan-owned Boeing 747.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking with nearly two decades of American policy, House Republicans called Tuesday for explicit guarantees of a U.S. military defense of Taiwan if the island should be attacked by China. The decision--enshrined in a formal statement by the House Republican Policy Committee and included in a resolution introduced Tuesday--came less than a day after China announced new missile tests that will come closer than ever before to the shores of Taiwan.
NEWS
March 6, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking with nearly two decades of American policy, House Republicans called Tuesday for explicit guarantees of a U.S. military defense of Taiwan if the island should be attacked by China. The decision--enshrined in a formal statement by the House Republican Policy Committee and included in a resolution introduced Tuesday--came less than a day after China announced new missile tests that will come closer than ever before to the shores of Taiwan.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed an unexceptional moment when Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) spoke against a resolution last year to overturn 17 years of American policy and allow Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui to make an unofficial visit to the United States. Johnston, reflecting long-standing U.S. policy that there is only one China and that its capital is Beijing, warned that Lee's visit, which was strongly opposed by the Clinton administration, risked damaging relations with China.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher and Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen on Tuesday began to thaw the recent freeze in U.S.-China relations, avoiding rhetoric and working toward a modest improvement in contacts between the two countries. The two officials talked for 90 minutes in a spacious conference center here in a session both sides characterized in cautiously positive terms.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of mounting tensions, the United States and China took small steps back from the brink of confrontation Thursday, exchanging conciliatory words but stopping well short of what the other side wanted on the two main irritants in their relationship.
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