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December 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One offended critic called it the "Chicken Kiev" speech, and it left a bitterness some Ukrainians could still taste as Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Wednesday spelled out American intentions toward their new country. As recently as one month ago, radical Ukrainian lawmaker Ivan Zayets recalled, "We were saying, 'We will be autonomous.' But America was still telling us, 'No, you won't, you'll be in the Soviet Union.'
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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One offended critic called it the "Chicken Kiev" speech, and it left a bitterness some Ukrainians could still taste as Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Wednesday spelled out American intentions toward their new country. As recently as one month ago, radical Ukrainian lawmaker Ivan Zayets recalled, "We were saying, 'We will be autonomous.' But America was still telling us, 'No, you won't, you'll be in the Soviet Union.'
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NEWS
November 30, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday sought to minimize the danger of a rupture in relations with Moscow over his Administration's planned recognition of an independent Ukraine. "We're all right," Bush insisted during a short shopping trip from his weekend retreat at Camp David, Md. "There's not going to be a big breach here." The attempt by Bush to play down the potential for a U.S.-Soviet rift came a day after Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday sought to minimize the danger of a rupture in relations with Moscow over his Administration's planned recognition of an independent Ukraine. "We're all right," Bush insisted during a short shopping trip from his weekend retreat at Camp David, Md. "There's not going to be a big breach here." The attempt by Bush to play down the potential for a U.S.-Soviet rift came a day after Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The readiness of the United States and its European allies to recognize Ukrainian independence brings to a halt any meaningful effort to reconstitute the Soviet Union as a single state, ending an era that shaped much of the 20th Century but providing no clear vision for the future.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ukrainians on Thursday warmly welcomed Washington's new readiness to recognize the statehood of their homeland, but the Kremlin reacted coolly to the news that the Bush Administration seems to be prepared to support the disintegration of the Soviet Union. "What has been shattered cannot be glued back together, and it is senseless to try," said Victor Burlakov, a leader of the Ukrainian grass-roots nationalist movement Rukh.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States now plans to offer diplomatic recognition to the soon-to-be independent Ukraine after President Bush and his senior advisers concluded that the Administration should no longer resist the tide of Soviet disintegration, U.S. officials said Wednesday. The decision, reached in a top-level White House meeting Tuesday, marks a significant departure in policy for an Administration that had long sought to prop up the central government in Moscow. "The handwriting is on the wall," a U.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The readiness of the United States and its European allies to recognize Ukrainian independence brings to a halt any meaningful effort to reconstitute the Soviet Union as a single state, ending an era that shaped much of the 20th Century but providing no clear vision for the future.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ukrainians on Thursday warmly welcomed Washington's new readiness to recognize the statehood of their homeland, but the Kremlin reacted coolly to the news that the Bush Administration seems to be prepared to support the disintegration of the Soviet Union. "What has been shattered cannot be glued back together, and it is senseless to try," said Victor Burlakov, a leader of the Ukrainian grass-roots nationalist movement Rukh.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States now plans to offer diplomatic recognition to the soon-to-be independent Ukraine after President Bush and his senior advisers concluded that the Administration should no longer resist the tide of Soviet disintegration, U.S. officials said Wednesday. The decision, reached in a top-level White House meeting Tuesday, marks a significant departure in policy for an Administration that had long sought to prop up the central government in Moscow. "The handwriting is on the wall," a U.
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