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NEWS
August 28, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With seven of the Soviet Union's 15 constituent republics now proclaiming independence, the rest of the world community has devised a whole new lexicon to describe its future relationship with the fledgling nations. According to U.S. officials, however, the only thing that really matters is whether full diplomatic recognition is extended. There is no important difference between the various terms that have been used to describe relationships short of full diplomatic recognition.
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one ever branded Herbert Hoover a Red-tinged fellow traveler. Yet in 1921, as secretary of commerce, he led an American relief drive to feed the people of the new Communist Soviet state. "Mr. Secretary," a woman protested, "aren't we going to help Bolshevism by feeding these people?" The future President banged his fist angrily on the table. "Twenty million people are starving," he said. "Whatever their politics, they shall be fed."
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one ever branded Herbert Hoover a Red-tinged fellow traveler. Yet in 1921, as secretary of commerce, he led an American relief drive to feed the people of the new Communist Soviet state. "Mr. Secretary," a woman protested, "aren't we going to help Bolshevism by feeding these people?" The future President banged his fist angrily on the table. "Twenty million people are starving," he said. "Whatever their politics, they shall be fed."
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush plans to announce Thursday that the United States will recognize the independence of all 12 former Soviet republics and immediately establish formal diplomatic relations with six of them, Administration officials said Monday.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, the United States has championed the cause of Baltic independence, steadfastly refusing to acknowledge the annexation of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania by the Soviet Union and granting their representatives the sort of diplomatic presence they were denied by much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush gave Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev a valuable political gift Friday by signing a U.S.-Soviet trade agreement, something the Kremlin leader desperately wanted to take home to Moscow from this week's summit meeting. In return, U.S. and Soviet officials indicated, the Soviet leader told Bush that he is confident he can get peaceful negotiations started with the rebellious Baltic republic of Lithuania within the next few weeks--meeting a major U.S.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Soviet negotiators Thursday completed their work on a comprehensive trade accord designed to pave the way for a further normalization of trade relations with Moscow during President Bush's summit meeting May 30 with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Thursday's announcement, which followed three days of closed-door talks in Paris, came despite calls by some members of Congress for Bush to postpone the negotiations until Moscow resolves its current tensions with Lithuania.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday unanimously approved the treaty ending the post-World War II division of Germany and sent it to the full Senate. The committee had hoped the Senate could act before the unification of West Germany and East Germany, but the Senate recessed for the evening without action. The panel voted 19 to 0 in favor of the treaty, signed Sept. 12 in Moscow by Britain, France, the Soviet Union, the United States and East and West Germany.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A new current of opposition has emerged to the nomination of Robert M. Gates as head of the CIA--this time within the intelligence community itself--adding to the obstacles he already faces in a bitter confirmation battle. The dissenters include active CIA officers whose unorthodox overtures to members of Congress have caused the Senate Intelligence Committee to open new inquiries into their allegations.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III indicated Friday that the nuclear arsenal of the old Soviet Union is no longer under the command of a single, central authority and has now passed to the "collective" control of independent republics. Baker said the United States regards such a realignment as acceptable, and President Bush, after speaking by telephone to both Boris N. Yeltsin and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, said he had been assured that Soviet nuclear weapons remain safe.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III called on Americans and their allies Thursday to join in a coordinated effort to help the newly independent Soviet republics become prosperous, Western-style democracies and announced that President Bush will summon foreign officials to Washington next month to launch the drive. In a major speech at Princeton University, Baker also cut the Bush Administration loose from its once-close tie to Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Officials in the Bush Administration are moving toward a reluctant consensus that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will lose the struggle for power in the crumbling Soviet Union and that the United States must now focus its diplomatic attention on Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin. As President Bush met Wednesday with his top national security advisers, his ambassador to Moscow told Congress that Yeltsin will "unquestionably" become the dominant American partner.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid fresh warnings from the U.S. ambassador to Moscow that food shortages have reached the crisis stage in the crumbling Soviet Union, American officials said Tuesday that the newly formed Slavic commonwealth might help speed the delivery of Western aid to the Soviets. "I think the food situation in certain areas is worse than you read," Ambassador Robert Strauss said. "In Moscow, the lines are getting longer for bread, and the bread costs more. There is an anger that I haven't seen before. . .
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only a few months ago--it seems like an age--President Bush was hard at work with a seemingly reliable partner in the quest for reform in the Soviet Union and a new world order around the globe. His partner's name was Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Then came Moscow's abortive coup last August, and the Bush Administration was forced to make a place in its thinking for the rough-hewn president of the Russian republic, Boris N. Yeltsin. Now the avalanche of changes sweeping across what U.S.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration said Monday that it is moving toward "full diplomatic recognition" of the Ukraine and announced that Secretary of State James A. Baker III will visit Kiev and Moscow next week to discuss the republic's transition to independence.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government's top Soviet-watchers have been burning the midnight oil regularly during the past two weeks' crisis in the Soviet Union, but by their own admission they have had little to do but watch. Now, they're about to reappraise what they have seen. As communism collapsed and the very fabric of the Soviet Union disintegrated, Soviet specialists in the State Department were dispatched to staff around-the-clock reaction centers. Events broke at a rapid pace.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III called on Americans and their allies Thursday to join in a coordinated effort to help the newly independent Soviet republics become prosperous, Western-style democracies and announced that President Bush will summon foreign officials to Washington next month to launch the drive. In a major speech at Princeton University, Baker also cut the Bush Administration loose from its once-close tie to Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Ukraine hurtling toward independence, lawmakers from the Soviet republics have agreed in principle on their homelands' right to field their own armies, seemingly posing a threat to the world's largest fighting force, the Soviet army, Ukrainian officials said Saturday. Returning from talks in Moscow, Vasily V.
NEWS
December 1, 1991
A story about the Ukrainian independence drive in today's issue of the Los Angeles Times Magazine was printed before the Bush Administration made it clear last week that it would recognize an independent Ukraine.
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