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United States Foreign Policy Vietnam

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August 11, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her father had been missing in Indochina for nearly 25 years, and suddenly there was a controversial photograph of him, along with two other American MIA soldiers, somewhere in the jungle. Shelby Robertson Quast was desperate for information, and when she spotted Defense Secretary Dick Cheney at a POW-MIA meeting here last month, she made a beeline for his table.
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NEWS
November 19, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days after Saigon fell to the Communists in April 1975, Hanoi's soldiers went from embassy to embassy in the capital of the defeated South, replacing the flags of foreign nations with that of a unified Vietnam. But they bypassed the abandoned U.S. Embassy and never hoisted their flag over it. One journalist who had shunned the helicopter evacuation and remained behind asked a senior Communist official why the U.S. Embassy had been spared. "Because we do not want to humiliate the Americans.
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NEWS
July 3, 1993 | DE TRAN and CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton's announcement loosening restrictions on lending to Vietnam was being widely viewed by the Vietnamese-American community Friday as a logical, albeit risky, step toward normalization of relations. Some Orange County companies have already made plans to start trading as soon as the embargo is lifted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO TIMES
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War and who became the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered the specter of a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War being the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time his tour of duty as an Army medic in Vietnam ended in 1966, Earl Clarkson says, he was "a dead zombie with a smile on." Coming home, he struggled with frequent bouts of depression. He tried to kill himself twice. He broke his wife's nose in a spasm of uncontrollable rage. He had nightmares and flashbacks of Vietnam so vivid, he says, that he could "smell the monsoon rains." So when he read news accounts about how former Defense Secretary Robert S.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Bush Administration begins to move toward normal relations with Vietnam, some critics are raising a delicate, long-submerged issue: whether Hanoi's Communist government must first be pressed to open the way for democracy before major steps are taken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle warned Wednesday that the current epidemic of Japan-bashing has increased racial tensions in American neighborhoods and threatened an international trade war that could devastate the nation's economy. "This type of immoderate rhetoric must stop," Quayle said in a speech to about 400 people in Westminster's Little Saigon, the largest Vietnamese community outside of Vietnam.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | Associated Press
The U.S. government has begun telling thousands of Vietnamese in crowded refugee camps throughout Southeast Asia to go home, marking a shift in American policy. The U.S. Consulate in Hong Kong confirmed that the new policy is to encourage boat people to return home voluntarily. Refugee rights activists criticized the plan as another in a string of "confusing signals" Washington has sent to the estimated 100,000 boat people crowding squalid camps in Asia. They say the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | DANIEL YI and GINA PICCALO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Keaveney and Hung Trieu Doan, two old soldiers who carry their wartime memories to work each day, thought about President Clinton's arrival in Hanoi on Thursday and winced. Both were cynical as they considered the specter of a president who evaded military service during the Vietnam War being the first president to visit Vietnam since the war ended a quarter-century ago.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | Associated Press
Former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara and others who waged war in Vietnam came together Friday to examine why the fighting dragged on for so long. Former warriors, scholars and political analysts met here in the Vietnamese capital to compare notes on why peace initiatives failed and the United States became entangled in a war McNamara has since called unwinnable. "We each could have achieved our geopolitical objectives without a terrible loss of life," McNamara told the Associated Press.
NEWS
January 15, 1997 | JIM MANN
President Clinton still has a few foreign-policy surprises to pop in his second term, and one is Vietnam. Over the past few months, with no public announcement of any kind, the Clinton administration has taken small but significant steps toward establishing military ties with Vietnam--that is, the same Hanoi regime with which the United States fought a bloody war three decades ago. In October, a senior Pentagon official and officers of the U.S.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam began pressing hard Saturday for a series of economic benefits from the United States after finally obtaining the formal diplomatic ties that open the way for those privileges. In ceremonies today, Secretary of State Warren Christopher looked on solemnly, his right hand folded across the chest of his dark gray, double-breasted suit, as the American flag was raised over the new U.S. Embassy in Hanoi. The same building had served as the U.S. liaison office here since January.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time his tour of duty as an Army medic in Vietnam ended in 1966, Earl Clarkson says, he was "a dead zombie with a smile on." Coming home, he struggled with frequent bouts of depression. He tried to kill himself twice. He broke his wife's nose in a spasm of uncontrollable rage. He had nightmares and flashbacks of Vietnam so vivid, he says, that he could "smell the monsoon rains." So when he read news accounts about how former Defense Secretary Robert S.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | THUAN LE and LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 600 demonstrators from rival Vietnamese factions set aside political differences Saturday, uniting to protest President Clinton's decision to lift the trade embargo against their native land. Two separate rallies merged in Little Saigon as Vietnamese exiles, young and old, carried banners calling for human rights in Vietnam. Among them were about a dozen veterans of the Vietnam War and relatives of missing U.S. servicemen.
NEWS
July 14, 1988
Twenty-five sets of remains tentatively identified as those of American military personnel missing in Vietnam were turned over to U.S. officials in a simple ceremony at Hanoi's airport. One official, who asked not to be named, said that further identification of the remains--the second-largest such return made by the Vietnamese--would be made by the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
The last time Tung saw his brother, Tam, now 56, was in the final days of April, 1975, before Saigon fell to the Communist armies of North Vietnam. "I told him I was going to escape and leave Vietnam," Tung recalled Monday. "I asked him to come with me, but he said he couldn't go. He was a major in the South Vietnamese army and he said he had a responsibility to remain and ensure the safety of the South Vietnamese people."
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The somber ceremony at a wind-swept corner of Hanoi's Noi Bai airport was almost painfully low-key, but it spoke volumes about the state of U.S. relations with Vietnam. On one side stood Winston Lord, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, on his second trip this year to Hanoi, standing at attention in a gray suit with his hand over his heart. On the other were aluminum coffins containing what were believed to be the remains of eight U.S.
NEWS
September 14, 1993 | JIM MANN and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton eased the U.S. trade embargo against Vietnam on Monday by clearing the way for American companies to take part in projects financed by international institutions such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. The action marks the first time since the downfall of the former South Vietnam that American companies will be permitted to do actual business inside the country. Last year, the Bush Administration opened the way for U.S.
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