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United States Foreign Policy Yugoslavia

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NEWS
April 5, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
When President Clinton released the new figures Friday showing unemployment had dropped to a 29-year low, he ironically underscored a critical element of his political problem in Kosovo. This has been a decade when very little has gone wrong for America. In domestic life, virtually every economic and social trend, from unemployment to teen pregnancy, is moving in the right direction. The only thing rising faster than the federal budget surplus is the stock market.
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NEWS
October 5, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turbulent days following Yugoslavia's disputed election have become a test of whether the Clinton administration can help bankroll the opposition to Slobodan Milosevic without allowing the Yugoslav leader to label his foes foreign stooges. There can be no question of the U.S. financial stake in Vojislav Kostunica's first-place finish in last month's election.
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NEWS
June 8, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Even if the fraying peace agreement with Serbia can be stitched back together, it would be an overstatement to describe it as a triumph after all the human suffering and physical destruction that have ravaged Kosovo these last 10 weeks. But if NATO can compel compliance--admittedly still a big if--the agreement would represent a vindication for President Clinton and the alliance. Clinton is routinely accused of lacking the self-discipline to set a course and stick to it.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after the first of more than 5,000 U.S. troops marched into Kosovo to help impose a fragile peace, Clinton administration officials are acknowledging an unsettling truth: They won't be coming home any time soon. Unlike the "one-year-only" bravado that accompanied U.S. forces into Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1995, there is not even an estimate from these officials of the duration of international military operations in Kosovo. But their message is clear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore arrived in Los Angeles on Monday for two days of campaigning in California, but he quickly and repeatedly assumed the mantle of a tough-talking advocate for the Clinton administration's policies in Kosovo. Even before landing here at midday, the vice president placed a call from Air Force 2 to the family of Andrew A. Ramirez, one of three soldiers held captive in Serbia, to offer his prayers as well as official assurances.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bulldozers groaned, the welders sweated rivers, and a feverish army of Serbian laborers poured concrete, gravel and paint Saturday as the son of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic personally orchestrated the furious pace of construction. But in a nation where NATO bombs and missiles left a wasteland of broken bridges, smashed factories, ruined railways and impotent power plants, this madcap activity took place at none of the above.
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Convinced of both a moral imperative and a military necessity to blunt the conflict in Kosovo, a bare majority of Americans supports the U.S.-led airstrikes against Serbian forces but stiffly opposes the future use of ground troops except as post-cease-fire peacekeepers, a Los Angeles Times Poll found Thursday. A narrow 53% said they approve of the decision to send in American forces, while 43% disapproved.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turbulent days following Yugoslavia's disputed election have become a test of whether the Clinton administration can help bankroll the opposition to Slobodan Milosevic without allowing the Yugoslav leader to label his foes foreign stooges. There can be no question of the U.S. financial stake in Vojislav Kostunica's first-place finish in last month's election.
NEWS
April 5, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aboard the cruiser Philippine Sea, Capt. Ronald Jenkins issued the order to fire at 6:50 p.m., just as dusk was settling over the Adriatic Sea. In a small, dimly lighted cubicle called the Combat Information Center, a petty officer clicked a computer mouse, sending the first Tomahawk cruise missiles blasting from their deck tube hatches with a loud pop.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ethnic war in Kosovo is provoking a kind of civil war inside the Republican Party. In rapid fashion, the conflict in the Balkans is widening a fissure in the GOP over America's role in the world. While Democrats mostly have supported President Clinton's course, Republicans are being torn in diametrical directions as Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's forces systematically expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanians from Kosovo.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
On the night of June 2, 1999, President Clinton's national security advisor, Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, sat glumly in his corner office in the White House's West Wing. His task: drafting a memo advising Clinton to prepare for a ground invasion of Yugoslavia. NATO's air war against Serbia had been underway for 71 days, but Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic hadn't buckled. Almost a million refugees from Kosovo had fled into exile, and thousands more were homeless inside the province.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greeks, who once worshiped a god of hospitality, still take pride in their generosity to guests. But the Anti-Power Reception Committee for Bill Clinton is something else. When the American president arrives this evening for a state visit, the committee, a tiny band of black-clad anarchists, will join in wider street protests against what its members call U.S. bullying in the Balkans.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bulldozers groaned, the welders sweated rivers, and a feverish army of Serbian laborers poured concrete, gravel and paint Saturday as the son of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic personally orchestrated the furious pace of construction. But in a nation where NATO bombs and missiles left a wasteland of broken bridges, smashed factories, ruined railways and impotent power plants, this madcap activity took place at none of the above.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Even if the fraying peace agreement with Serbia can be stitched back together, it would be an overstatement to describe it as a triumph after all the human suffering and physical destruction that have ravaged Kosovo these last 10 weeks. But if NATO can compel compliance--admittedly still a big if--the agreement would represent a vindication for President Clinton and the alliance. Clinton is routinely accused of lacking the self-discipline to set a course and stick to it.
NEWS
May 1, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing public doubts about his handling of the Kosovo crisis have erased President Clinton's lofty job-approval ratings, which soared during the impeachment crisis, according to public opinion surveys and analysts. Since the air war against Yugoslavia began March 24, the rate of approval for Clinton's performance has fallen by 5 to 10 percentage points in most polls.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon said Thursday that it plans to call up as many as 33,000 reservists--mostly Air Force pilots and ground crews--for NATO's Yugoslav campaign, on the same day the department's top officials acknowledged that the fighting could last for several more months. The plan to activate reservists came shortly after President Clinton proposed a massive postwar program to rebuild Yugoslavia's Kosovo province and bring all of the Balkans into the European mainstream.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Openly irritated by the foot-dragging of some U.S. allies, Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said Thursday that the world may have "dithered" away its best chance to stop the bloody Yugoslav ethnic war. Eagleburger predicted that the U.N. Security Council eventually will authorize military action to enforce the "no-fly zone" over Bosnia-Herzegovina but said the debate on it has already gone on far too long.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with worsening federal deficit projections, the new Administration is considering a "broad-based energy tax" but has not discussed a possible gasoline tax increase, Vice President-elect Al Gore said Sunday in an interview on NBC's "Meet the Press." Gore also said that President-elect Bill Clinton and his foreign policy advisers are seriously discussing working toward a partial lifting of the U.N.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to the war in Kosovo, most members of Congress can be found closing the doors and drawing the blinds, preferring to wait until public opinion gels before taking a stand on a mission Americans are decidedly uneasy about. But one House member is bent on smoking them out--San Jose Republican Tom Campbell, who wants Congress to vote within the month to formally declare war on Yugoslavia or get out.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ethnic war in Kosovo is provoking a kind of civil war inside the Republican Party. In rapid fashion, the conflict in the Balkans is widening a fissure in the GOP over America's role in the world. While Democrats mostly have supported President Clinton's course, Republicans are being torn in diametrical directions as Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's forces systematically expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanians from Kosovo.
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