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United States Foreign Policy

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March 21, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's White House staff, rekindling the rancor of the 1980 election campaign, denounced former President Jimmy Carter on Friday for criticizing Administration policy in a speech in Cairo. "We are deeply disappointed by his comments," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "If he wants to be helpful in the area of foreign affairs, he might want to forgo criticism of U.S. leaders while he's on foreign soil."
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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive U.S. invasion force on Wednesday overthrew the regime of Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, chasing the dictator into hiding with an air and infantry assault that left at least 15 American GIs dead. The White House offered a $1-million reward for information leading to Noriega's capture.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, when he first dispatched troops to Saudi Arabia, President Bush said he was drawing "a line in the sand." But the line keeps shifting. As the crisis in the Persian Gulf has intensified, the United States has been adding to the list of formal and informal objectives it hopes to achieve with its massive military deployment. "There's a kind of list which gets revised as they go along," said one prominent analyst, Helmut Sonnenfeldt of the Brookings Institution.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
Robert C. McFarlane, President Reagan's former national security adviser and a key figure in the Administration's Iran arms sale operation, took an overdose of 25 to 30 Valium tablets Monday morning in what police said was a suicide attempt. The overdose occurred about three hours before McFarlane was to testify before the Tower Commission investigating the operation of the National Security Council staff in light of the arms sale scandal.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a breakdown of law and order in postwar Kosovo, the Clinton administration launched a program Thursday that would create a pool of police officers ready on short notice to come to the aid of U.N. peacekeepers around the world. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who announced the initiative, said it is intended to bolster U.N. programs, supplying temporary international police forces for countries where normal law enforcement doesn't exist. Although U.N.
NEWS
February 13, 1987
April 28, 1986: Iranian-born California businessman Albert Hakim, acting at the direction of Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, purchases the Danish ship Veralil for 2.5 million Danish crowns, or about $312,500. The owner of record is a dummy Panamanian firm, Dolmy Business Inc. May 5: Hakim changes the ship's name to the Erria and registers it in Panama.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Albert A. Hakim, the Iranian-born California businessman who played a leading role in U.S. arms sales to Iran, approached the CIA in July, 1983, with a plan to gain favor with the Iranian government by selling it arms, a source familiar with the contact said Wednesday. The source, speaking on the condition that he not be identified, said Hakim contacted the CIA immediately after two apparent representatives of the Iranian government met with him at his office in San Jose.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Monday launched a scathing assault on Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton's foreign policy credentials as President Bush told voters that no issue in this election year would matter more than trust. The attack, a major escalation of a White House effort to question the character and competence of the Democratic ticket, came as Clinton and running mate Al Gore began to challenge Bush's foreign policy leadership.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A small freighter that delivered U.S. guns to Nicaraguan rebels at a time when Congress had banned government aid to the contras later took part in an abortive attempt by Lt. Col. Oliver L. North to free American hostages in Lebanon with $1 million in ransom, government and maritime sources said Thursday.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Sunday expressed a "debt of gratitude" to U.S. military personnel around the world for their role in deterring the development and use of weapons of mass destruction and stressed the need to remain "vigilant," particularly in the face of threats from Iraq and North Korea. Although he was speaking in South Korea, Clinton clearly had the ongoing tensions with Iraq on his mind. Just a little more than a week earlier, he gave the go-ahead for a massive airstrike against Iraq.
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