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United States Foreign Policy

NEWS
February 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Almost a year before he began the large-scale military buildup in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson called the war "the biggest damn mess I ever saw" and lamented: "I don't think it's worth fighting for, and I don't think we can get out." Johnson made the complaint in a May 27, 1964, phone conversation with his national security advisor, McGeorge Bundy. Tapes of the conversation, and another the same day with his close friend and political mentor, Sen.
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NEWS
September 16, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Tuesday called on Congress to shift $166 million in savings gained this year from shutting down a major nuclear weapons project to new projects designed to guard against nuclear proliferation. The request, which follows an Administration decision to halt construction of a $1-billion tritium-producing nuclear reactor, was described by Energy Secretary James D. Watkins as a shift in priorities from "swords to plowshares."
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of the last four decades, American intelligence agencies saw Soviet communism not only as the principal enemy of the United States but as the sinister force behind other hostile powers around the world, from Asia to the Middle East to Latin America. So it marked a bit of startling revisionism when outgoing CIA Director Robert M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990 | LYDIA RAMOS and MONICA RODRIGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An estimated 5,000 people, many of whom were not born 20 years ago, marched peacefully through East Los Angeles on Saturday to mark the violent anti-Vietnam War protest on the same streets that ended in the death of newsman Ruben Salazar and two others in 1970. Although the 3 1/2-mile march on Atlantic and Whittier boulevards was staged to bring public attention to the same issues that prompted the original protest rally--U.S.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I view this as very, very important diplomacy," President Bush said recently as he unveiled a new mission for Vice President Dan Quayle. The words Bush used to heighten the diplomatic standing of a series of three trips Quayle is to make to Central and South America over the next two months apply equally to the political importance of the trips for Quayle--and perhaps for Bush himself. Details of the journeys are likely to be announced today.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a flurry of diplomatic maneuvers surrounding the confrontation with Iraq, President Bush has agreed to cancel $7.1 billion in debts Egypt owes the United States for military equipment, is considering a massive new sale of weapons to Israel and may meet within the week with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Administration officials said Friday. At the same time, U.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton unveiled his long-awaited national security strategy Thursday, outlining a broad approach to foreign policy issues decidedly more muted than the one he and his aides described during the early days of the Administration. The 50-page document, distributed without fanfare after the normal workday, contained watered-down versions of earlier White House pronouncements on issues such as the use of military force, global peacekeeping and expansion of democracy around the world.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
In the optimistic glow of President Bush's inauguration week, Secretary of State James A. Baker III confidently told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that he intended "to hit the ground running--instead of just hitting the ground." It hasn't worked that way. Six weeks after Baker's confirmation, his own aides acknowledge that their first steps on the job have looked more like running in place.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago, as Secretary of State James A. Baker III was regaling a rapt breakfast table of congressmen with tales from his latest visit to Moscow, a pair of Democrats broke in to complain about the Administration's foreign aid programs. If the Cold War was over, they asked, why hadn't the budget changed? Why wasn't there more money for the new democracies in Eastern Europe and poor countries in Latin America and Africa? Baker's hazel eyes narrowed. His honeyed voice went cold.
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
CIA Director William J. Casey told an associate of international arms dealers in January, 1985--seven months before the first known White House-sanctioned arms shipments--that the United States was supplying arms to Iran, according to documents filed Monday in a New York federal court. Roy M.
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