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United States Foreign Populations

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July 15, 1988 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
Kong Moua, a Hmong tribesman from the hills of Laos, drove to the Fresno City College campus looking for his intended bride. Locating her at her job in the student finance office, he spirited her away to his cousin's house. Kong Moua called it zij poj niam, or "marriage by capture," in his culture an accepted form of matrimony akin to elopement. However, his "bride," also a Hmong but more assimilated into American culture, called it kidnaping and rape. She also called the police.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2001 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jesus Rivera was happy to oblige when the U.S. government requested that he be specific about his race and ethnicity in the 2000 census. Rivera marked "Mexican" for his ethnicity and "Native American" for race in his questionnaire. But he prefers another option: shedding what he calls his "European slave identity" altogether and instead embracing his indigenous past.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
After its opening salutations, the letter from Rio de Janeiro read: "When you come from the Third World to the First World by plane, the first thing you notice is that everything around is so refined and civilized that you can almost reject your own culture. "Then you start to ask yourself lots of questions.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
As America nears the end of the 20th century, nearly one U.S. resident in 10 is foreign born--a proportion similar to that recorded 150 years ago. During the 1990s, the nation's foreign-born population increased nearly four times faster than that of the native-born population, the Census Bureau says in a report being released today. Overall, there were 25,208,000 foreign-born U.S. residents as of July 1, 1998--9.3% of the nation's population.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Kuwaiti students in the United States have had to scramble for money because of the Iraqi takeover of their country, but the Kuwaiti Embassy in Washington has taken steps to pay their tuition and other expenses. In a statement sent recently to colleges and universities across the country, the embassy asked that "all tuition bills" of Kuwaiti students be forwarded to Washington. And it said that all Kuwaiti students will be given a monthly stipend to cover living expenses.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
As America nears the end of the 20th century, nearly one U.S. resident in 10 is foreign born--a proportion similar to that recorded 150 years ago. During the 1990s, the nation's foreign-born population increased nearly four times faster than that of the native-born population, the Census Bureau says in a report being released today. Overall, there were 25,208,000 foreign-born U.S. residents as of July 1, 1998--9.3% of the nation's population.
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The number of foreign students attending colleges and universities in the United States increased 5.1% in the 1997-98 school year to a total of 481,280, according to a new report. But among countries competing for foreign students, the U.S. share of such students continued to slip. The study--which also found the number of U.S. students studying abroad increased by 11.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to head off an embarrassing boycott of next June's international AIDS conference here, Rep. J. Roy Rowland (D-Ga.) on Wednesday introduced legislation that would give the secretary of health and human services the authority to liberalize restrictions on admitting foreigners infected with the AIDS virus. The bill would direct HHS Secretary Louis W.
NEWS
January 6, 1988
One of every 10 babies born in the United States is the offspring of a mother who came here from another country, the Census Bureau reported. Of the 3,625,000 births in the United States in 1986, about 370,000 were the children of foreign-born women, the bureau said. That 10% rate is up from about 7.5% of births in 1983, the only previous time births to foreign-born women were calculated, said Martin O'Connell of the bureau's Fertility Statistics Branch.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
In what could be a decisive ruling in the emotionally charged case of eight Los Angeles-area aliens arrested 30 months ago on subversion charges, a federal judge announced here Wednesday that he will hold a trial to decide whether the immigrants are being unconstitutionally prosecuted because of their political beliefs. Attorneys for the aliens were elated. "Now we'll finally get our day in court," said immigration lawyer Marc Van Der Hout of the National Lawyers Guild.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest group of immigrants to the United States since the beginning of the century is embracing the nation's lifestyle by the millions--buying homes, speaking English, becoming citizens and intermarrying at surprisingly high rates, according to a new study of national census data. Commentators brought together by the report's sponsors at a forum Tuesday in Los Angeles called the conclusions consistent with the ethnic transformation of Southern California.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From the Washington Post
A new study of census data shows that the number of immigrants living in the United States has almost tripled since 1970, rising from 9.6 million to 26.3 million, far outpacing the growth of the native-born population. The new figures dramatically affirm that the country is going through a remarkable transformation in just a generation, one that will reshape its demographics and social landscape for years to come.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
As many as 70 foreign citizens on death rows nationwide, including 17 in California, were held after their arrests in violation of an international treaty that guarantees a person access to his nation's consulate, according to Amnesty International and State Department officials. The treaty guarantees that individuals arrested in a foreign country must be told by police "without delay" that they have a right to contact their country's consulate. If an individual requests it, U.S.
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The number of foreign students attending colleges and universities in the United States increased 5.1% in the 1997-98 school year to a total of 481,280, according to a new report. But among countries competing for foreign students, the U.S. share of such students continued to slip. The study--which also found the number of U.S. students studying abroad increased by 11.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | JIM MANN and SUSAN ABRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The South Korean government on Friday sought help from the Clinton administration to prevent Korean students from dropping out of American universities in the midst of the country's financial crisis. Over the past few months, some of the almost 40,000 Korean students in the United States have been unable to pay tuition, living costs or loans because the depreciating value of the South Korean won has made a U.S. education more expensive than it used to be.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House of Representatives unanimously approved a two-year extension of a visa waiver program that allows about 12 million tourists and business people to enter the U.S. without a visa. The agreement, passed, 407 to 0, extends a reciprocal pact with 26 other nations, and is meant to promote tourism and business exchange with nations like Britain, Japan and Germany and other major U.S. trading partners.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration may renew its policy of banning people infected with the AIDS virus from immigrating to the United States, scrapping earlier plans to overturn that stand, a source said Saturday. Dr. James O. Mason, the assistant secretary for health, on Friday forwarded to Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan a proposed regulation that would retain the current prohibition on those infected with AIDS, said an HHS source who spoke on grounds of anonymity.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The sound of crashing markets in Asia is being heard on American college campuses, as international students receive word from their fretful parents: cut back on expenses or come home. USC junior Elizabeth Choo is packing to return to South Korea. She got an urgent phone call from her mother, explaining that the collapse of South Korea's currency in effect had doubled the cost of her $30,000 in tuition, expenses, room and board.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The sound of crashing markets in Asia is being heard on American college campuses, as international students receive word from their fretful parents: cut back on expenses or come home. USC junior Elizabeth Choo is packing to return to South Korea. She got an urgent phone call from her mother, explaining that the collapse of South Korea's currency in effect had doubled the cost of her $30,000 in tuition, expenses, room and board.
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