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NEWS
April 4, 1998 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A troubled former CIA officer from the agency's top secret "black bag" unit that breaks into foreign embassies to steal code books was charged with espionage Friday for tipping off two countries about the CIA's success in compromising their communications. Douglas F. Groat, 50, who after a 16-year career was fired in 1996 from the CIA's Science and Technology Directorate, was indicted Friday in U.S. District Court in Washington and could face the death penalty, prosecutors said.
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NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the focus on Afghanistan, the U.S.-led war on terrorism has quietly picked up pace worldwide, with increasing results even in problem areas ranging from Sudan in Africa and Yemen on the Arabian Peninsula to the Philippines in Southeast Asia, according to U.S. officials. The United States has tangible evidence that terrorist attacks outside Afghanistan have been disrupted, delayed or prevented by the four-month global effort, the officials say. Often with U.S.
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NEWS
July 6, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William von Raab has no doubts about who torpedoed his decision to slap a 25% tariff on Japanese minivans when he was U.S. customs commissioner in 1989: It was James Lake, a former campaign adviser to President Bush turned influential lobbyist, intervening for the Japanese, he contends. As Von Raab tells it, his Customs Service ruling was unquestioned until Lake, who had served as a top campaign strategist for Bush in 1988 and is a confidant of former U.S. Trade Representative Clayton K.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top U.S. diplomat Monday accused Iraq, North Korea and three other countries of pursuing germ weapon programs, an unusually pointed diplomatic charge designed to put pressure on nations suspected of flouting an international ban on biological arms. John R. Bolton, the U.S.
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reform Party presidential candidate Patrick J. Buchanan, in an admitted departure from his past views, said Thursday that U.S. sanctions against countries such as Iraq, Cuba, Iran and Libya should be lifted. In a speech calling for a "more moral" foreign policy, Buchanan argued that sanctions the United States imposes on so-called rogue states harm innocent women and children without accomplishing the goal of toppling the regimes in those countries.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States wants to enjoy all the might that comes from being the world's only superpower without exercising any of the responsibility, governments around the globe complained Thursday, a day after the Senate voted against ratifying a nuclear test-ban treaty.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Friday continued an intense round of meetings with foreign leaders as he prepared to address the U.N. General Assembly today. After speaking by telephone with the president of Nicaragua, Bush met in the Oval Office separately with the foreign minister of Morocco, the prime ministers of India and the Czech Republic and the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia. The near-constant stream of foreign leaders to the White House since the Sept.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | GREG MILLER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Appalled at the failure of U.S. intelligence agencies to detect or prevent the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Congress is beginning to consider how to revamp and reinvigorate the nation's spy services. Both sides of the aisle appear determined to upgrade the capability and reach of the nation's 13 known intelligence agencies, whose estimated $30-billion annual budget--the true figure is classified--is likely to rise sharply. The House Intelligence Committee has taken the lead in the debate.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the American war effort heats up, more journalists are pouring into central Asia every day. Still more are volunteering to go--in many cases, virtually begging to go--presenting editors across the country with increasingly difficult personnel decisions. Mindful of the lure, the glory of The Big Story--and of the number of reporters who have been killed covering past wars--editors say they don't want "cowboys" or big risk-takers.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an overture to the Republican-controlled Congress, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright called Wednesday for an executive-legislative effort to develop a bipartisan approach to foreign policy, especially the use of economic sanctions to punish countries and companies that contribute to nuclear proliferation or trade with "rogue" states.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stern President Bush brought his counter-terrorism campaign to the United Nations on Saturday, urging all members to join the fight because "every other country is a potential target" of Osama bin Laden and his followers. "Every nation has a stake in this cause. . . . This struggle is a defining moment for the United Nations itself," Bush said as he alternately coaxed and lectured the gathering of world leaders and officials during a 22-minute address.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Friday continued an intense round of meetings with foreign leaders as he prepared to address the U.N. General Assembly today. After speaking by telephone with the president of Nicaragua, Bush met in the Oval Office separately with the foreign minister of Morocco, the prime ministers of India and the Czech Republic and the foreign minister of Saudi Arabia. The near-constant stream of foreign leaders to the White House since the Sept.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the American war effort heats up, more journalists are pouring into central Asia every day. Still more are volunteering to go--in many cases, virtually begging to go--presenting editors across the country with increasingly difficult personnel decisions. Mindful of the lure, the glory of The Big Story--and of the number of reporters who have been killed covering past wars--editors say they don't want "cowboys" or big risk-takers.
NEWS
October 12, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Progress. And patience. Vigilance. And a return to normality. Bomb Afghanistan. And feed it. In his prime-time news conference Thursday night, President Bush sought to balance conflicting--almost contradictory--messages that underscored the complexity of the unfolding war against terrorism. Bush was direct, often forceful, but more reflective than belligerent. He spent almost as much time musing about the moral and cultural impact of the Sept.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | GREG MILLER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Appalled at the failure of U.S. intelligence agencies to detect or prevent the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Congress is beginning to consider how to revamp and reinvigorate the nation's spy services. Both sides of the aisle appear determined to upgrade the capability and reach of the nation's 13 known intelligence agencies, whose estimated $30-billion annual budget--the true figure is classified--is likely to rise sharply. The House Intelligence Committee has taken the lead in the debate.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manal Karaki has bright eyes, a slightly crooked smile and the quick wit of a 20-year-old college student who wants a career in television. America says she supports terrorism. Haida is a 25-year-old college graduate who volunteers on weekends selling discounted school supplies to low-income families. America says he promotes terrorism.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite Beijing's often draconian punishment of dissenters, the average Chinese citizen enjoys "more personal freedom than ever before," the State Department said Friday in its annual report on human rights conditions in 194 nations around the world. The report was a striking reappraisal by the Clinton administration, which last year said China's human rights record was so bad that all the government's opponents were either in jail or in exile.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A large American delegation, led by President Clinton, signaled a more assertive U.S. international economic policy at the World Economic Forum that wrapped up here Tuesday. By getting directly involved in their economies, the United States proposes to help the poorest countries win access to global investment capital by working on programs to forgive their current debts, tending to the health and education of their children and pushing harder for higher labor and environmental standards.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Congress moved Wednesday to lift economic sanctions against Pakistan and British Prime Minister Tony Blair prepared to travel to Islamabad, the latest steps by the United States and its allies to improve relations with a regime treated as an outcast before the war on terrorism. Blair's trip, tentatively set for Friday, would make him the highest-level Western visitor since the Sept. 11 attacks.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen years of U.S. pressure preceded Pakistan's extradition this week of a man convicted in a deadly 1986 Pan Am hijacking, but the hand-over of the remaining four hijackers could face further delays, according to officials here. The first of the hijackers, who were indicted by the U.S. in 1991, was delivered to American authorities Monday, winning high praise from President Bush.
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