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United States Foreign Relations Afghanistan

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May 27, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Old-timers remember this as a lively, playfully irreverent city. Once, street urchins had a standard greeting for Westerners strolling down the market lanes: "Hey, Mr. Katchalu, " they would shout. That means "Mr. Potato" in the local Dari language. The nickname dates back two centuries to the Europeans who introduced potatoes to this remote Central Asian land ringed with mountains. But it is no longer heard on the streets of Kabul.
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NEWS
February 26, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As three Afghan men swung their arms and swayed to music once banned by the Taliban, wide-eyed Afghans at a religious fete hosted by a regional warlord watched another landmark event unfold. Among the 400 U.S. and Canadian guests of Kandahar Gov. Gul Agha Shirzai, three female American soldiers rose to mimic the dance, their M-4 rifles bouncing off their swinging hips--this in the conservative birthplace of the Taliban, where many women have yet to doff their head-to-toe burkas.
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NEWS
August 2, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze concluded two days of talks in the Siberian city of Irkutsk today by agreeing on the importance of Soviet and American cooperation in Asia. "In Asia, too, the Soviet Union and the United States do not regard each other as adversaries," Shevardnadze told reporters during a news conference after the talks. The U.S.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will help Afghanistan develop its national army and train its police forces, President Bush said Monday as he met for the first time with Hamid Karzai, the head of the Afghan interim government. Bush's pledge deepened his administration's commitment to rebuild a country ravaged by 23 years of war and rebellion--and most recently by U.S. military strikes that crumbled the ruling Taliban regime and uprooted the Al Qaeda terrorist organization.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
In a surprise announcement, Afghanistan's ruling Taliban militia said Saturday that it is willing to engage the United States in wide-ranging talks that could include the status of suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden. The U.S. government maintains that Bin Laden masterminded the twin bombings of its embassies in Kenya and Tanzania last year and that it wants him deported to the United States to stand trial.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council voted Tuesday to tighten sanctions on Afghanistan's Taliban regime unless it closes "terrorist" training camps and hands over Osama bin Laden, suspected in the bombings of two U.S. embassies. Russia and the United States joined forces to muscle the resolution through the 15-member council, despite some countries' concern that the sanctions will only fuel Afghanistan's civil war and worsen conditions for its people.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration denied a report Wednesday that the United States and the Soviet Union have reached an agreement on settling the war in Afghanistan, but officials pointed to significant progress in resolving the conflict. A television broadcast saying that a deal was completed is a "product of the rumor mill," said Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who is traveling in Asia and will meet with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze in Irkutsk next week.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration bluntly predicted Thursday that the current Soviet-backed regime in Afghanistan headed by President Najibullah will collapse after the Soviet Union pulls its 115,000 troops out of the country. "Our estimate is that the government could splinter and fall of its own weight even before the final Soviet pullout," Robert A. Peck, deputy assistant secretary of state, told the House subcommittee on Asia in an extraordinarily candid assessment of the government's prospects. " .
NEWS
April 5, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
A leading Senate supporter of U.S. aid to the Afghan rebels expressed concern Monday that the United States and its allies may be "falling into a trap" in negotiations with the Soviet Union aimed at ending the war in Afghanistan. After meeting with Afghan resistance leaders in the frontier city of Peshawar, Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey (R-N.H.), who has been conducting a fact-finding tour, told reporters that he has cabled President Reagan "expressing my grave concerns about the situation."
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The Reagan Administration has been trying to persuade the Afghan guerrillas not to attack departing Soviet troops, fearing this tactic could prompt Moscow to back off its promise to be out of Afghanistan by Feb. 15, U.S. officials said Monday. This is among the issues that a newly appointed U.S. envoy to the rebels, Edmund McWilliams, is expected to discuss with insurgent leaders operating out of base camps in Pakistan, the officials said.
NEWS
December 8, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials scrambled Friday to paper over an apparent split with their allies in the new Afghan government over how leaders of the crumbling Taliban regime should be treated after their capture. One day after the new interim government chief, Hamid Karzai, ignited an outcry in Washington by suggesting that he might grant amnesty to Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, U.S. officials reached Afghan leaders to stress their strong view that top Taliban figures should not be treated leniently.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sardar Bibi Khan, a farmer from southern Afghanistan, never thought much about America other than as a place that helped his country overthrow the Russians, but one month into the U.S. bombing campaign his view has changed. Khan, 35, said he came to Pakistan to find medical aid for a sister whose arm was shattered when an American helicopter fired a missile at her house.
NEWS
October 12, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush gave the Taliban regime in Afghanistan a new chance Thursday to turn over Osama bin Laden and his lieutenants and bring an end to the war there. But barring such surrender, he said, the campaign could last two years. The president also said for the first time that, after the fighting ends, he saw a longer-term "nation-building" role for the United States, along with the United Nations, in stabilizing war-ravaged Afghanistan.
NEWS
August 3, 2001 | From Associated Press
In its first high-level meeting with Afghanistan's ruling militia, the Bush administration told the Taliban on Thursday that it must stop supporting terrorists before any serious progress can be made in relations with the United States. Osama bin Laden, the alleged terrorist mastermind who has been living in Afghanistan under Taliban protection since 1996, was a main focus of the discussions in neighboring Pakistan.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. government paid its first official visit to Afghanistan in more than two years, sending three people to assess devastation caused by war and drought, U.N. officials said. Peter Morris and George Haven of the State Department and Tom Husaek of the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, are visiting with the World Food Program. The U.S. is a proponent of sanctions against the ruling Taliban militia but has given Afghanistan 75,000 tons of food this year, the WFP said.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Taliban envoy appealed to the Bush administration Monday to overlook his group's support of extremist Osama bin Laden and the destruction of priceless centuries-old Buddhist sculptures and lift sanctions on Afghanistan to help alleviate a humanitarian crisis threatening the lives of a million people. Sayed Rahmatullah Hashemi delivered a letter from the Taliban for President Bush that called for better U.S.-Afghan relations and negotiations to solve the dispute over the Saudi-born Bin Laden.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
For the Soviet Union, the taste of military failure has come on this arid, inhospitable terrain in Central Asia, land of the Pushtun warrior and the Hindu Kush Mountains. On Sunday, the Soviet army is to begin withdrawing from its unsuccessful armed intervention in Afghanistan's bitter civil war as Moscow pulls out an estimated 115,000 troops over the next nine months.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writers
With the Soviet evacuation of Afghanistan giving President Reagan the first dramatic success for his policy of backing anti-communist insurgencies in the Third World, American strategists hope to make the once-neglected subject of regional conflicts into a centerpiece for the Moscow summit. And for once, U.S. hopes may run parallel to the thinking in Moscow. Kremlin leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council voted Tuesday to tighten sanctions on Afghanistan's Taliban regime unless it closes "terrorist" training camps and hands over Osama bin Laden, suspected in the bombings of two U.S. embassies. Russia and the United States joined forces to muscle the resolution through the 15-member council, despite some countries' concern that the sanctions will only fuel Afghanistan's civil war and worsen conditions for its people.
NEWS
October 2, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A generation after the Soviet invasion launched Afghanistan into a vicious cycle of war, the strict Islamic movement known as the Taliban has scored a series of military victories in recent days that have given it control of more than 95% of the rugged Central Asian nation, according to senior Taliban officials and U.S. intelligence reports. The latest offensive could mark a turning point both politically and militarily for the Taliban, which seized power in the Afghan capital, Kabul, in 1996.
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