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United States Foreign Relations Africa

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NEWS
December 10, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright acknowledged that the United States for more than three decades viewed Africa as little more than a disaster-prone Cold War battlefield but pledged Tuesday to open a "new chapter" in relations with countries on the continent that promise to build democracy and free-market economies.
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NEWS
February 2, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, who has pledged to make Africa a higher U.S. priority, met Thursday with Congo's new president to explore the prospect of ending that country's complex, many-sided war. Powell discussed the deteriorating situation in Congo with President Joseph Kabila, who last month succeeded his assassinated father, onetime guerrilla chieftain Laurent Kabila. The session followed a similar discussion Wednesday between Powell and Rwandan President Paul Kagame.
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NEWS
February 18, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was nothing less than a coming-out party for a significant force in shaping America's global priorities, more than 2,000 representatives from the country's newest lobbying group met here Thursday to approve an action plan for U.S. policy toward Africa.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty years after the first wave of independence sparked great hopes for the continent, Africa faces a bleaker future than at any time in the past century, according to a recent U.S. intelligence assessment, Clinton administration officials and experts on the region. Just two years ago, during a six-nation tour of the continent, President Clinton hailed what he called an "African renaissance."
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For several of the African Americans along, President Clinton's African odyssey has been the emotional equivalent of President Richard Nixon's trip to China. With their president, they have viewed the haunting shores of West Africa from which many of their ancestors were taken in the dark days of slavery.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher arrived in Mali on Monday on the first leg of a five-nation trek across Africa during which he will try to tighten the squeeze on outlaw regimes, encourage democratic reforms and find a new secretary-general for the United Nations. On his weeklong tour, Christopher revealed Monday, he will launch a new round of diplomacy aimed at further isolating Nigeria's military regime, led by Gen. Sani Abacha, by means of selective new sanctions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1989 | THOMAS BECHER, Times Staff Writer
It was that smile. Four years ago this month, Cheryl Shotts of Indianapolis watched as Diane Sawyer interviewed a starving boy for a "60 Minutes" segment on the famine in the west African nation of Mali. Mesmerized by the boy's gentle grin and dignity in the face of the death around him, Shotts felt she must do something to save the child. Her life would soon become a voice for African children looking to escape a life of hunger, disease and poverty.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, arriving here early today at the start of a six-nation tour of Africa, said hard-pressed African economies can do themselves more good by emphasizing private enterprise than by waiting for U.S. foreign aid. Talking to reporters shortly before his Air Force jetliner landed at Dakar, Shultz said some past programs damaged the recipient nations because donated food and other commodities discouraged local production.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Winding up a week's tour of Africa, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said Monday that Washington's traditional foreign policy emphasis on human rights must be adjusted to take into account the "local context" of the continent's diverse countries. This was a rare admission by a top U.S. official that the American model of multi-party democracy, freedom of association and respect for opposition opinion may not be exportable to the Third World.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the torpid heat of the Mozambican summer, in a village far from paved roads and running water, National Security Adviser Anthony Lake sat on a stool and heard the story of fisherman Jose Chemane Bizho--the simple story of Africa's fragile hopes and frightful danger. "When I was young," said the bearded fisherman, "I joined the army for two years. But I fought on for 17. Today, I want my own fishing project. I'm looking for somebody to support me and buy me some nets."
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what was nothing less than a coming-out party for a significant force in shaping America's global priorities, more than 2,000 representatives from the country's newest lobbying group met here Thursday to approve an action plan for U.S. policy toward Africa.
NEWS
October 18, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost half a century in which U.S. policy treated Africa as little more than a pawn on the Cold War chessboard, President Clinton promised a new approach to the world's poorest continent, stressing American assistance to promote democracy, free-market economic principles and peaceful resolution of conflicts.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few issues make for such odd alliances in Congress as free trade. So it wasn't that startling Wednesday when Rep. Ed Royce, a conservative Republican from Fullerton, and Rep. Charles B. Rangel, a liberal New York Democrat, stood shoulder to shoulder here to pledge anew their support for legislation to strengthen trade with Africa. Royce talked up a policy of engagement with a continent often marginalized from the global economy.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing at the transit point for millions of manacled Africans en route to slavery in the New World, President Clinton on Thursday declared this picturesque isle's horrible past to be as much a part of American as African history. The visit to Goree Island was the crowning gesture of Clinton's 12-day African tour, which was as much about affirming black Americans as it was about building new ties with Africa.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For several of the African Americans along, President Clinton's African odyssey has been the emotional equivalent of President Richard Nixon's trip to China. With their president, they have viewed the haunting shores of West Africa from which many of their ancestors were taken in the dark days of slavery.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Stirred by his journey through Africa, President Clinton promised to seek Senate approval of a treaty--largely ignored by the United States--to slow the spread of deserts. He said humanity has "a sacred obligation to protect our environment." Clinton, in a speech Tuesday at the Mokolodi Nature Reserve, also announced that NASA will use its satellites for the first environmental review of southern Africa.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing at the transit point for millions of manacled Africans en route to slavery in the New World, President Clinton on Thursday declared this picturesque isle's horrible past to be as much a part of American as African history. The visit to Goree Island was the crowning gesture of Clinton's 12-day African tour, which was as much about affirming black Americans as it was about building new ties with Africa.
NEWS
October 18, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost half a century in which U.S. policy treated Africa as little more than a pawn on the Cold War chessboard, President Clinton promised a new approach to the world's poorest continent, stressing American assistance to promote democracy, free-market economic principles and peaceful resolution of conflicts.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton traveled Sunday from Africa's youngest democracy to its oldest, where he praised the government and people of Botswana for being a model for the rest of the continent for 30 years. "We have seen the promise of a new Africa whose roots are deep here in your soil, for you have been an inspiration to all who cherish freedom," Clinton told a prosperous-looking crowd after arriving here from South Africa, just to the south.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few blocks from the White House, leaning against a batch of umbrellas for sale in a white bucket, David Opot happily shared his view of President Clinton's visit to Opot's home continent, Africa. "It's nice. It's welcome," declared the 40-year-old street vendor, who immigrated to the United States from Kenya five years ago. But, he asked with feeling, "will anything good come out of it?"
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