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NEWS
March 16, 1992 | From The Times Washington staff
CRACKDOWN BACKING: Algeria quietly sent a special envoy to Washington earlier this month in search of sympathy for its crackdown against fundamentalist Muslim militants and for its cancellation of parliamentary elections. By all accounts, the sympathy came through. . . . The envoy, Redha Malek, said his government canceled elections because the party that appeared almost sure to win--the fundamentalist Islamic Salvation Front--would have "destroyed democracy." U.S.
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NEWS
December 31, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new role of Algerians in alleged terrorist plots against the United States is attributable largely to a combination of three factors--skills, anger and lack of association in the past with anti-American extremism--according to senior U.S. officials and experts on Algeria. At least three suspects apparently have ties with Algeria's Armed Islamic Group (GIA), but they may also be acting independently, under directives from others outside the GIA or international terrorist Osama bin Laden.
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NEWS
August 12, 1988
Senate Republican leader Bob Dole, discarding normal Senate courtesies, ignored another GOP senator's long-standing objections and permitted confirmation of a backlog of 45 presidential nominees. The action filled diplomatic vacancies, many of them months old, at U.S. embassies in nations around the world, including El Salvador, Lebanon, Syria, Bolivia and Colombia. Dole said the Senate logjam had been caused by Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey (R-N.H.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the Christmas Eve jet hijacking in Algiers, Clinton Administration officials had identified the rapidly escalating conflict between Algeria's military-backed regime and its Islamic opposition as the most serious "new" foreign policy crisis likely to grab world headlines in 1995. Algeria's regime took power after a January, 1992, military coup voided elections that seemed certain to lead to an Islamic government.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Former President Jimmy Carter arrived in Algiers on Monday at the start of a five-nation, private Middle East tour during which he is expected to seek information on U.S. hostages being held in Lebanon. Carter publicly thanked Algeria for its help in securing the release of American hostages held by Iran during his presidency, the Algerian news agency APS said. Algeria was a mediator in negotiations.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new role of Algerians in alleged terrorist plots against the United States is attributable largely to a combination of three factors--skills, anger and lack of association in the past with anti-American extremism--according to senior U.S. officials and experts on Algeria. At least three suspects apparently have ties with Algeria's Armed Islamic Group (GIA), but they may also be acting independently, under directives from others outside the GIA or international terrorist Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
The Bush Administration settled in Monday for a potentially lengthy siege of waiting and working to secure the release of U.S. hostages in Lebanon, as experts concluded that the hanged man shown in a videotape last week was almost certainly hostage William R. Higgins.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the Christmas Eve jet hijacking in Algiers, Clinton Administration officials had identified the rapidly escalating conflict between Algeria's military-backed regime and its Islamic opposition as the most serious "new" foreign policy crisis likely to grab world headlines in 1995. Algeria's regime took power after a January, 1992, military coup voided elections that seemed certain to lead to an Islamic government.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration delivered a mild rebuke Monday to Algeria's military-backed interim government for canceling the runoff of the country's first free, fair parliamentary election, although that move prevents Islamic fundamentalists from taking power in the strategic North African nation. "We view the situation there with concern--the interruption of the electoral process," State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | From Reuters
Deputy Secretary of State John C. Whitehead said Saturday he will strongly urge that hijackers of a Kuwaiti jet be brought to justice in a meeting with Algerian officials next week. Whitehead leaves Monday on a trip that includes stops in Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco and France. The United States criticized the deal last month in which Algeria allowed the hijackers, who killed two hostages, to leave the plane at Algiers.
NEWS
March 16, 1992 | From The Times Washington staff
CRACKDOWN BACKING: Algeria quietly sent a special envoy to Washington earlier this month in search of sympathy for its crackdown against fundamentalist Muslim militants and for its cancellation of parliamentary elections. By all accounts, the sympathy came through. . . . The envoy, Redha Malek, said his government canceled elections because the party that appeared almost sure to win--the fundamentalist Islamic Salvation Front--would have "destroyed democracy." U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration delivered a mild rebuke Monday to Algeria's military-backed interim government for canceling the runoff of the country's first free, fair parliamentary election, although that move prevents Islamic fundamentalists from taking power in the strategic North African nation. "We view the situation there with concern--the interruption of the electoral process," State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
The Bush Administration, despite its stated policy of refusing to negotiate with terrorists, signaled Wednesday that it is prepared to deal--even with terrorists--if that will help secure the return of eight American hostages held in Lebanon.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
The Bush Administration settled in Monday for a potentially lengthy siege of waiting and working to secure the release of U.S. hostages in Lebanon, as experts concluded that the hanged man shown in a videotape last week was almost certainly hostage William R. Higgins.
NEWS
August 12, 1988
Senate Republican leader Bob Dole, discarding normal Senate courtesies, ignored another GOP senator's long-standing objections and permitted confirmation of a backlog of 45 presidential nominees. The action filled diplomatic vacancies, many of them months old, at U.S. embassies in nations around the world, including El Salvador, Lebanon, Syria, Bolivia and Colombia. Dole said the Senate logjam had been caused by Sen. Gordon J. Humphrey (R-N.H.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | From Reuters
Deputy Secretary of State John C. Whitehead said Saturday he will strongly urge that hijackers of a Kuwaiti jet be brought to justice in a meeting with Algerian officials next week. Whitehead leaves Monday on a trip that includes stops in Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco and France. The United States criticized the deal last month in which Algeria allowed the hijackers, who killed two hostages, to leave the plane at Algiers.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
The Bush Administration, despite its stated policy of refusing to negotiate with terrorists, signaled Wednesday that it is prepared to deal--even with terrorists--if that will help secure the return of eight American hostages held in Lebanon.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Former President Jimmy Carter arrived in Algiers on Monday at the start of a five-nation, private Middle East tour during which he is expected to seek information on U.S. hostages being held in Lebanon. Carter publicly thanked Algeria for its help in securing the release of American hostages held by Iran during his presidency, the Algerian news agency APS said. Algeria was a mediator in negotiations.
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