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United States Foreign Relations Angola

NEWS
April 26, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angola's foreign minister Wednesday announced direct talks "within the next few days" between the Marxist government and the U.S.-backed UNITA rebels who have fought a decade-long civil war in the southern African nation. Pedro de Castro Van Dunem told reporters at a breakfast conference that the talks could begin in Portugal, the former colonial power in Angola that he credited with bringing the two sides together. But he said the exact time and place of the talks had not yet been fixed.
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NEWS
July 2, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Cuban troops will remain in Angola until South Africa puts an end to apartheid and grants independence to neighboring Namibia, Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos has declared. "From our point of view, there will be total peace and tranquility only when Namibia is free and apartheid is ended," Dos Santos said at an impromptu press conference here this week after meeting U.S. congressmen.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
An unprecedented meeting among top officials from the United States, Angola, Cuba and South Africa will be held in London next week to discuss a settlement of the 13-year-old civil war in Angola and independence for Namibia, the State Department said Friday.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration's top policy-maker for southern Africa conceded Tuesday that the 13-year-old civil war inside Angola may continue despite the cease-fire agreement announced Monday. According to Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker, the cease-fire agreement covers only outside forces fighting in Angola, including South African and Cuban troops.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | United Press International
Delegates from Angola, Cuba and South Africa reached a provisional agreement Tuesday on a U.S.-mediated peace settlement that would end the 13-year-old Cuban troop presence in Angola and grant independence to neighboring Namibia. Delegations from the three countries said in a joint statement that their governments will now consider approval of the accord, with a "final round of negotiations" to be held in the Congolese capital of Brazzaville at a date to be announced. U.N. and U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | From Reuters
President Reagan's top Africa expert Wednesday held a second day of talks with Angolan government officials on new proposals for the withdrawal of Cuban troops from Angola and independence for Namibia (South-West Africa). Chester A. Crocker, the U.S. assistant secretary of state for African affairs, met Angolan Foreign Minister Alfonso Van Dunem in Luanda, following the resumption of high-level contacts between Marxist Angola and the United States three months ago.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher flew Monday to this war-ravaged capital to try to jump-start the process to end one of the world's deadliest conflicts. But the visit from the highest-ranking U.S. official since Angola became independent in 1975 was marred by the nonappearance of Jonas Savimbi, leader of the rebel movement known as the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, or UNITA.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Civil rights activist Jesse Jackson said Friday night that an American pilot held by the Angolan government since April 21 will be freed soon, "maybe by week's end." The Democratic presidential hopeful said Angola demanded that he go to the African nation to be on hand for the release of Joseph Longo of Greensburgh, Pa. "We talked to the vice minister of foreign affairs and they have agreed to release him," Jackson told the annual meeting of the Americans for Democratic Action.
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