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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, when he first dispatched troops to Saudi Arabia, President Bush said he was drawing "a line in the sand." But the line keeps shifting. As the crisis in the Persian Gulf has intensified, the United States has been adding to the list of formal and informal objectives it hopes to achieve with its massive military deployment. "There's a kind of list which gets revised as they go along," said one prominent analyst, Helmut Sonnenfeldt of the Brookings Institution.
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NEWS
April 9, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an ominous reflection of growing Arab anger at the United States, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell was greeted on the first leg of his high-stakes Mideast mission Monday with a testy challenge about the Bush administration's priorities and new demands before the Arab world will aid the peace effort.
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NEWS
November 2, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Syria's foreign minister, a scowl of indignation on his face Friday, held up a picture of a 32-year-old Yitzhak Shamir. "He kills peace mediators," charged the minister, Farouk Shareh, summoning up a lifetime of vitriol. Shareh's performance was the climax of a morning of intense hostility between the Syrian and Israeli representatives to the Madrid peace talks.
NEWS
April 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
The text of President Bush's remarks Thursday on the Middle East, as transcribed by EMedia MillWorks Inc.: Good morning. During the course of one week, the situation in the Middle East has deteriorated dramatically. Last Wednesday, my special envoy, Anthony Zinni, reported to me that we were on the verge of a cease-fire agreement that would have spared Palestinian and Israeli lives.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel and Syria, for more than four decades the most implacable foes in the Middle East, put aside name-calling and hostility Tuesday to begin face-to-face negotiations about the substance of peace. The Syrian-Israeli talks, the first time direct negotiations between the two countries have moved beyond procedural issues, contrasted with new wrangling between Israel and the joint Jordanian-Palestinian delegation.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the man who will coordinate U.S. efforts to destabilize Iraq at her side, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright completed a three-nation tour of friendly Arab countries Thursday, appealing for at least tacit support in the campaign to bring down Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. By introducing Frank Ricciardone to the leaders of Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, Albright stripped away any vestige of diplomatic ambiguity from Washington's anti-Hussein program.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an ominous reflection of growing Arab anger at the United States, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell was greeted on the first leg of his high-stakes Mideast mission Monday with a testy challenge about the Bush administration's priorities and new demands before the Arab world will aid the peace effort.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day that began with a personal display of respect for Islam and ended at a palace, Vice President Dick Cheney delved into the thicket of Middle Eastern history and hatreds Saturday, conferring with Crown Prince Abdullah here about the Saudi's proposal to restrain the latest Israeli-Palestinian violence.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wrapped up her whirlwind tour of the Mideast and Europe on Tuesday without winning a united mandate from U.S. allies to launch what could be the most punishing military strike against Iraq since Operation Desert Storm. Yet, in key areas, the United States achieved more than it expected in six days of consultations with 10 allies over a response to Baghdad's refusal to comply with U.N. disarmament efforts.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright begins consultations with Arab leaders today to prepare the region for possible military action against Iraq, she will find them unanimous in wishing that the problem be resolved through diplomatic means.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a day that began with a personal display of respect for Islam and ended at a palace, Vice President Dick Cheney delved into the thicket of Middle Eastern history and hatreds Saturday, conferring with Crown Prince Abdullah here about the Saudi's proposal to restrain the latest Israeli-Palestinian violence.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | WILLIAM M. ARKIN, TIMES SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Behind a veil of secret agreements, the United States is creating a ring of new and expanded military bases that encircle Afghanistan and enhance the armed forces' ability to strike targets throughout much of the Muslim world. Since Sept. 11, according to Pentagon sources, military tent cities have sprung up at 13 locations in nine countries neighboring Afghanistan, substantially extending the network of bases in the region.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | Reuters
The Arab League voiced astonishment and concern Sunday at the U.S. decision to veto a U.N. resolution calling for international monitors to help curb violence between Israel and the Palestinians. Arab League Secretary-General Amr Moussa "expressed his astonishment and intense concern that the United States employed its right of veto," said a statement by the league, which is based in Cairo. Moussa said the resolution was "balanced and objective."
NEWS
December 15, 2001 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palestinians and their Arab allies forced a confrontation with Washington early today, with the United States announcing it would veto an Arab-backed Security Council resolution calling for international intervention to halt "a dangerous deterioration of the situation" in the Gaza Strip and West Bank. The draft resolution won the support of a large council majority, with France, Russia and Ireland joining the expected Asian and African supporters of the Arab position.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | From Reuters
The head of the 22-nation Arab League on Sunday dismissed an appeal by Osama bin Laden to Muslims to join a holy war against the West, saying the Saudi militant did not speak for the world's Arabs and Muslims. Egypt, the Arab world's most populous country, also rejected the appeal, saying the world was united against Bin Laden.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Although nobody is talking about U.S. oil interests in the war on terrorism, beneath the surface serious questions are bubbling about long-term supplies of petroleum and the shape of governments in the oil-rich Middle East. Once the war is over--"once Afghanistan is stabilized," in one oilman's words--a new order may emerge. The oil-bearing countries' relationship with the United States and other regions will change. There will be a power shift among oil producers.
NEWS
September 14, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Egypt and Saudi Arabia endorsed Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's approach to the Israeli-Palestinian peace process Saturday, despite a drumbeat of criticism directed toward her by the government-influenced media in both countries.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, entangled in a rare public flap with the White House, has used American and Israeli newspapers to apologize for comments in which he suggested the United States was appeasing Arab states the way the West appeased Adolf Hitler on the eve of World War II. Sharon told the newspapers Saturday that he regretted he was misunderstood, and his aides said they were confident the dispute, which triggered an angry rebuke from Washington, was now put to rest.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Syrian President Bashar Assad and his Iranian counterpart, Mohammad Khatami, spoke by telephone and agreed that Islamic states should hold consultations concerning the attacks on the United States, a Syrian presidential spokesman said. Diplomats said the countries were rallying support for an emergency meeting of Islamic foreign ministers to forge a common stand on the attacks and possible U.S. retaliation. Syria and Iran, both on a U.S.
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