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United States Foreign Relations Argentina

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NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
John Taylor, international point man for the U.S. Treasury Department, concluded a visit to Argentina saying he was impressed with its measures to erase its budget deficit and spur growth. In a U.S. Embassy statement issued shortly before he was due to fly back to the United States, the Treasury undersecretary for international affairs said his meetings with top Argentine government officials had been "fruitful and detailed."
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BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | SIMON GARDNER, REUTERS
Argentine Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo was confident Sunday that a visit by U.S. Treasury official John Taylor would help secure aid from the International Monetary Fund to boost confidence and stave off fears of a debt default. But in an interview with leading daily La Nacion Sunday, Cavallo was evasive about whether he had sought new cash on top of pre-agreed disbursements from multilateral lenders such as the IMF and what kind of IMF help he meant. "I am sure . . .
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NEWS
October 19, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday hailed a new partnership with Argentina on global warming and the environment, capping a weeklong bid to win the trust of South Americans who long have viewed the United States as a go-it-alone bully. Against a backdrop of the snowcapped Andes jutting into a crystal-blue sky, Clinton cited the "broad and deep partnership" reached with Argentine President Carlos Menem on climate change issues.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
John Taylor, international point man for the U.S. Treasury Department, concluded a visit to Argentina saying he was impressed with its measures to erase its budget deficit and spur growth. In a U.S. Embassy statement issued shortly before he was due to fly back to the United States, the Treasury undersecretary for international affairs said his meetings with top Argentine government officials had been "fruitful and detailed."
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three years after a terrorist bomb killed his daughter and 85 others in one of the bloodiest anti-Semitic attacks since the Holocaust, Luis Czyzewski is still hunting for justice. Today he will ask the help of the most powerful leader in the world. The Argentine accountant has already told his story to foreign leaders: During U.S.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | From Reuters
President Raul Alfonsin of Argentina will meet President-elect George Bush in Washington today, the Argentine Embassy announced. Alfonsin will travel to Washington after speaking before the U.N. General Assembly in New York.
NEWS
October 8, 1987
A San Francisco federal judge ruled that three alleged kidnap-torture victims can proceed with a $60-million lawsuit against a man called the "Adolf Eichmann of Argentina," Carlos Guillermo Suarez Mason, 63, who commanded the 1st Army Corps in Argentina from 1976 to 1979 and was chief of staff from 1979 to 1983, when the military dictatorship under which he flourished fell. He fled the country and was arrested Jan. 24, 1987, at his home in suburban Foster City.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | SIMON GARDNER, REUTERS
Argentine Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo was confident Sunday that a visit by U.S. Treasury official John Taylor would help secure aid from the International Monetary Fund to boost confidence and stave off fears of a debt default. But in an interview with leading daily La Nacion Sunday, Cavallo was evasive about whether he had sought new cash on top of pre-agreed disbursements from multilateral lenders such as the IMF and what kind of IMF help he meant. "I am sure . . .
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Reagan Administration officials are outraged at the refusal of five Latin American countries to go along with a U.S. effort in the United Nations to protest alleged human right abuses in Cuba, officials said Saturday. The U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva voted 19 to 18 on Wednesday, with six abstentions, for a motion by the Indian delegation to take no action on the U.S. proposal.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Three members of Congress from California asked the federal government Thursday to fly home the body of a young Argentine tourist who was killed in February near Yosemite National Park. California's two senators, Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, both Democrats, and Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St. Helena) said the gesture after the slaying of Silvina Pelosso, 16, would demonstrate "the United States' good will and sympathy regarding this horrific murder."
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Friday refused to help Argentina with its growing financial crisis. President Bush's national security advisor said Argentina should work to stabilize its economy, South America's second largest, and adhere to a course of fiscal responsibility that it had already set with the International Monetary Fund.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Three members of Congress from California asked the federal government Thursday to fly home the body of a young Argentine tourist who was killed in February near Yosemite National Park. California's two senators, Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, both Democrats, and Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St. Helena) said the gesture after the slaying of Silvina Pelosso, 16, would demonstrate "the United States' good will and sympathy regarding this horrific murder."
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Saturday hailed a new partnership with Argentina on global warming and the environment, capping a weeklong bid to win the trust of South Americans who long have viewed the United States as a go-it-alone bully. Against a backdrop of the snowcapped Andes jutting into a crystal-blue sky, Clinton cited the "broad and deep partnership" reached with Argentine President Carlos Menem on climate change issues.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
In this famed playground for the rich and famous, Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower caught the largest trout of their lives. Walt Disney artists copied enchanting forest backdrops for Bambi. Even Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid camped in Cholila Valley for a time. A resort boasts of one of Argentina's most challenging golf courses. On Friday, President Clinton came here, golf clubs in tow.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three years after a terrorist bomb killed his daughter and 85 others in one of the bloodiest anti-Semitic attacks since the Holocaust, Luis Czyzewski is still hunting for justice. Today he will ask the help of the most powerful leader in the world. The Argentine accountant has already told his story to foreign leaders: During U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Air Force One touched down here, the president of the United States stepped onto hostile and uncertain turf. It was 1990: President Bush visited Argentina a day after a failed military rebellion culminated in a firefight in front of the presidential palace. The region was struggling to shake off a history of tyranny and political and economic turmoil. Anti-Americanism was so virulent that Argentine Congress members tried to declare Bush persona non grata.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | From United Press International
The Argentine navy said Friday nearly all the fuel drums thrown into the Antarctic Ocean by a shipwreck have been recovered and no more oil slicks are visible, but American officials disputed that assessment. The excursion vessel Bahia Paraiso, piloted by an Argentine navy crew, hit a rock and partially sank on Jan. 28 after leaving the U.S. National Science Foundation's Palmer research station.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. and Argentine warships began joint maneuvers Monday for the first time in seven years. The then-military junta here withdrew from the so-called Unitas exercises that the U.S. Navy holds annually with its Latin American counterparts after Washington backed Britain in the Falkland Islands War.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most tangible symbol that Argentina has moved into a new era may be at a 4,000-acre compound on the outskirts of town that was once strictly off limits. A billboard used to warn: "Do not park, do not stop, or soldiers will shoot." Today, however, the beige barracks off Entrance No. 4 at Campo de Mayo, Argentina's largest military base, are home to the new International Peacekeeping Academy. And anyone is welcome. "This is a growth industry," boasts Col.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under American pressure, Argentina has finally turned over "missing" parts from a ballistic missile developed by this country with Iraq. The dismantling of Argentina's Condor II missile program is "all finished," Defense Minister Oscar Camilion said last week. In return, Argentina wants the right to buy militarily sensitive technology from the United States and other countries.
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