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United States Foreign Relations Argentina

NEWS
October 18, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. and Argentine warships began joint maneuvers Monday for the first time in seven years. The then-military junta here withdrew from the so-called Unitas exercises that the U.S. Navy holds annually with its Latin American counterparts after Washington backed Britain in the Falkland Islands War.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Friday refused to help Argentina with its growing financial crisis. President Bush's national security advisor said Argentina should work to stabilize its economy, South America's second largest, and adhere to a course of fiscal responsibility that it had already set with the International Monetary Fund.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two days after a violent military insurrection was put down by troops loyal to President Carlos Saul Menem, President Bush on Wednesday lauded the budding but fragile democracy in Argentina. Arriving in Buenos Aires less than 12 hours after Menem lifted a state of siege imposed at the start of the uprising, Bush said that "the message today from Argentina is clear--democracy is here to stay."
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebellious faction of Argentine officers staged a bloody but unsuccessful anti-government uprising Monday, two days before a scheduled visit here by President Bush. Rebels seized the army headquarters in downtown Buenos Aires, a block from the presidential palace, and three other military installations, battling troops loyal to the government throughout the day. The hostilities included heavy rifle fire, cannon shots and even aerial bombing of rebel tanks.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
In this famed playground for the rich and famous, Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower caught the largest trout of their lives. Walt Disney artists copied enchanting forest backdrops for Bambi. Even Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid camped in Cholila Valley for a time. A resort boasts of one of Argentina's most challenging golf courses. On Friday, President Clinton came here, golf clubs in tow.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most tangible symbol that Argentina has moved into a new era may be at a 4,000-acre compound on the outskirts of town that was once strictly off limits. A billboard used to warn: "Do not park, do not stop, or soldiers will shoot." Today, however, the beige barracks off Entrance No. 4 at Campo de Mayo, Argentina's largest military base, are home to the new International Peacekeeping Academy. And anyone is welcome. "This is a growth industry," boasts Col.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration has gotten off to a slow--some say faltering--start in its economic relations with Latin America, and some critics fear that it may dissipate the good will that the President has built up in the region since winning the November election. Shortly after his election, Bush met with the newly elected Mexican president-to-be, Carlos Salinas de Gortari, and promised that he would stop badgering Mexico publicly to crack down on drug kingpins.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf War has stirred up a welter of conflicting sentiments in Latin America, making it difficult for many of the region's governments to fully support the United States and its allies. Some Latin Americans look up to the United States and Western Europe, yearning to become part of that First World clan. In contrast, however, the Latin American view of the war is often colored by anti-Yankee bias and Third World solidarity, especially among leftists and nationalists.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Air Force One touched down here, the president of the United States stepped onto hostile and uncertain turf. It was 1990: President Bush visited Argentina a day after a failed military rebellion culminated in a firefight in front of the presidential palace. The region was struggling to shake off a history of tyranny and political and economic turmoil. Anti-Americanism was so virulent that Argentine Congress members tried to declare Bush persona non grata.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under American pressure, Argentina has finally turned over "missing" parts from a ballistic missile developed by this country with Iraq. The dismantling of Argentina's Condor II missile program is "all finished," Defense Minister Oscar Camilion said last week. In return, Argentina wants the right to buy militarily sensitive technology from the United States and other countries.
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