Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Armenia
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Armenia

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first popularly elected leader of an independent Armenia arrived Sunday for a three-day visit with political and business leaders in Southern California--home to one of the world's largest Armenian communities. Levon Ter-Petrossian, who was elected in 1991 after Armenia gained its independence for the first time in 600 years, is on a seven-day visit to strengthen economic ties between his embattled republic and the United States.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On almost any day, artist Hovik Gasparian can be found here seated on a stool, bent over an easel, putting oil on canvas to show the ruins of the city he loves. Deftly he paints the blown-apart buildings, the piles of rubble, the broken beams and the crushed fountains of this historic settlement high on a mountain in the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. From his studio in the town's half-ravaged art gallery, he looks out at the remains of the school he attended as a boy three decades ago.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A scholar in the history of ancient Armenia and Syria left his books two years ago and took to the streets to try to free his people from Communist rule. After six months behind bars for his dissident activities, Levon Ter-Petrosyan is now the president of the smallest Soviet republic. Changes are coming so rapidly in the Soviet Union that dissidents do become presidents and sit down to negotiate with the Kremlin leaders who had jailed them.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Bush administration's first venture into direct mediation of an international dispute, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell conferred Tuesday with the presidents of Armenia and Azerbaijan about the stalemated conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh. "These Key West talks highlight U.S. engagement in the international effort to bring peace" to the troubled region, Powell told reporters.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | United Press International
In an effort to smooth ruffled relations with Turkey, the State Department said Thursday that it strongly opposes a congressional resolution establishing an Armenian Day of Remembrance. The House Post Office and Civil Service committee approved, 14-4, a resolution describing as victims of genocide the Armenians who died in the 1915-1923 struggle with the Ottoman government of Turkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
A high-ranking official from Armenia's opposition party on Wednesday concluded a weeklong visit to Glendale during which he updated local Armenian leaders on his country's current political troubles and urged Washington officials not to cut off U.S. aid to Armenia. Seyran Bagdasarian, a member of the Armenian Parliament since 1990 and a key figure in the Armenian Revolutionary Federation Party, spoke to about 500 people at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | KATIA HETTER
When 16-year-old Artiom Saribekian walked into a surprise party for him at Kaiser Permanente Hospital-Orange County in Anaheim on Wednesday, it was a triumphant step in a journey that had begun with a chance meeting in Armenia after the 1988 earthquake there. Artiom entered the hospital in April suffering from hydrocephalus, a condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the skull. "When he came in, he was almost immobile," said Donna Donan, Kaiser public affairs director for Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
Two engineers from the Republic of Armenia arrived in Glendale this week for a one-month stay to learn first-hand how public utilities are administered in a Western, capitalist country. Vartan Markarian and Gagik Hovannisian will be the guests of the Glendale Public Service Department under the Energy Industry Partnership Program, which brings people involved in the administration of electric and gas utilities in the former Soviet Union to the United States. The program is sponsored by the U. S.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of Armenia urged President Bush on Thursday to send U.S. aid directly to the Soviet Union's remaining republics, but Bush rejected his plea and argued for keeping the Soviet central government involved. Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrosyan's account of his 40-minute meeting in the Oval Office indicated that Bush still wants to use U.S. aid to help maintain some central government authority in the Soviet Union, despite the rapid shift of power to the 12 remaining republics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
A high-ranking official from Armenia's opposition party on Wednesday concluded a weeklong visit to Glendale during which he updated local Armenian leaders on his country's current political troubles and urged Washington officials not to cut off U.S. aid to Armenia. Seyran Bagdasarian, a member of the Armenian Parliament since 1990 and a key figure in the Armenian Revolutionary Federation Party, spoke to about 500 people at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE
Two engineers from the Republic of Armenia arrived in Glendale this week for a one-month stay to learn first-hand how public utilities are administered in a Western, capitalist country. Vartan Markarian and Gagik Hovannisian will be the guests of the Glendale Public Service Department under the Energy Industry Partnership Program, which brings people involved in the administration of electric and gas utilities in the former Soviet Union to the United States. The program is sponsored by the U. S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first popularly elected leader of an independent Armenia arrived Sunday for a three-day visit with political and business leaders in Southern California--home to one of the world's largest Armenian communities. Levon Ter-Petrossian, who was elected in 1991 after Armenia gained its independence for the first time in 600 years, is on a seven-day visit to strengthen economic ties between his embattled republic and the United States.
NEWS
August 9, 1994
For the first time since his former Soviet republic gained its independence, President Levon Ter-Petrosyan will visit the United States, starting with a meeting with President Clinton at the White House today. Clinton invited Ter-Petrosyan, according to an Administration official, to "congratulate him on the cease-fire in Nagorno-Karabakh," the disputed Armenian enclave in Azerbaijan, and to discuss U.S. aid programs.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
An international initiative on stopping the war over the Nagorno-Karabakh enclave received a boost Thursday after Azerbaijan backed the plan and Armenia gave conditional approval. The proposal by the United States, Russia and Turkey calls for the withdrawal of Armenian troops from Azerbaijan's Kelbajar region and a 60-day cessation of hostilities starting Wednesday, to be followed by peace talks. The three countries said the plan, announced Monday, must be accepted or rejected in full.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Tuesday condemned an Armenian military offensive into neighboring Azerbaijan and called for both sides to resume negotiations to end the 5-year-old conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh. The statement marked the first time that the Clinton Administration has attempted to place blame for any aspect of the bitter ethnic war that began before Armenia and Azerbaijan obtained independence through the breakup of the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1989
An Armenian-American organization has been given permission to open an office in Yerevan, the capital of Soviet Armenia, to assist efforts in rebuilding parts of the region devastated in the December earthquake, officials said Monday.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Tuesday condemned an Armenian military offensive into neighboring Azerbaijan and called for both sides to resume negotiations to end the 5-year-old conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh. The statement marked the first time that the Clinton Administration has attempted to place blame for any aspect of the bitter ethnic war that began before Armenia and Azerbaijan obtained independence through the breakup of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, trying to walk a diplomatic tightrope over the most bitter ethnic conflict raging in the ruins of the Soviet Union, called Tuesday for a peaceful settlement of the fighting in Nagorno-Karabakh. But he carefully avoided placing blame. "Our message is for peaceful resolution of disputes," Baker said as he met Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrosyan at the president's modest two-story residence in this capital city.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|