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United States Foreign Relations Asia

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NEWS
August 2, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze concluded two days of talks in the Siberian city of Irkutsk today by agreeing on the importance of Soviet and American cooperation in Asia. "In Asia, too, the Soviet Union and the United States do not regard each other as adversaries," Shevardnadze told reporters during a news conference after the talks. The U.S.
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NEWS
July 29, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1997, Madeleine Albright gave Asia an object lesson in American moxie by dressing up as Madonna, tucking a red rose behind her ear, and poking fun at some of Asia's most-buttoned-down leaders in a song set to the tune of "Don't Cry for Me Argentina." On Friday, the secretary of state did it again, this time with a sayonara ditty set to the tune of "Thanks for the Memories."
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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom has the Asia-Pacific region appeared as pacific as now. In a single year, the Soviet threat has disappeared. Hopes for peace in Indochina have emerged. Ever-hostile North and South Korea are talking reconciliation. And America is preparing to make up with Vietnam. Spots of tension remain. But in a sweep down the coast of the Asian continent and around Southeast Asia, nowhere can a powder keg be found before arriving at India and Pakistan and their potential for nuclear war.
NEWS
September 13, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton vigorously touted trade and tranquillity in Asia on Sunday, urging business executives and the many world leaders gathered here to do their part to promote both. As Clinton praised the benefits of free trade and explored ways to reduce tensions on the Korean peninsula and in the Taiwan Strait, however, the crisis in East Timor loomed over the annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid rising political tensions on the Korean peninsula, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Japanese leaders Thursday to get parliament moving on guidelines that would enable Japan to back up the United States in military conflicts in the Asia-Pacific region. But long-stalled action on the guidelines--which were signed by the two countries in September 1997 but still require approval by parliament--is no slam-dunk.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would have been unimaginable only a few years ago. But President Clinton appears to have moved American foreign policy into a close alignment with China, ending the estrangement that has prevailed since the end of the Cold War. With their second amicable summit meeting in eight months, with a package of deals and a stunningly warm, earthy news conference, Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin have succeeded, at least for now, in forging a new partnership.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Suharto earlier this week stepped out to greet the high-level envoy President Clinton had sent here to talk about Indonesia's mounting financial crisis, the rumpled, plainly dressed man he beheld looked more like a college professor than an experienced diplomat. But the appearance was deceiving. Although Lawrence H.
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | Associated Press
Treading lightly on the hot coals of Asia's financial meltdown, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen began a tour of the region Sunday to demonstrate that the United States remains an ally "in good times and bad." He said his aim in Asia is to shore up confidence. About 100,000 U.S. troops are based in Asia, mostly in Japan and South Korea. In recent years, Southeast Asia has become a bigger buyer of U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister-designate Keizo Obuchi of Japan promised U.S. officials Sunday that he would do "whatever it takes" to revitalize his nation's economy and help to reverse Asia's yearlong financial crisis. Meeting with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright here at a gathering of foreign ministers from Southeast Asia and other nations, Obuchi said he is committed to following through on a $42.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing for more convenient and less expensive trans-Pacific air services, the United States is seeking "open skies" agreements with several Asian nations and will bypass a reluctant Japan if necessary, a U.S. official said here Thursday. Preliminary talks on such pacts--which open air services to unrestricted route and pricing competition--have been held with South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia and New Zealand, said U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Alan P. Larson.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | JIM MANN
No one paid much attention to Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's visit here this week-except, undoubtedly, the Chinese and the Russians. Obuchi's trip demonstrated to them how the United States is attempting to redesign its old Cold War alliances for the future-not just in Europe, where NATO is fighting a new kind of war, but also in Asia, where America and Japan are quietly establishing new sorts of military links.
NEWS
January 15, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid rising political tensions on the Korean peninsula, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen urged Japanese leaders Thursday to get parliament moving on guidelines that would enable Japan to back up the United States in military conflicts in the Asia-Pacific region. But long-stalled action on the guidelines--which were signed by the two countries in September 1997 but still require approval by parliament--is no slam-dunk.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The furor that erupted at a key Pacific Rim summit here after Vice President Al Gore criticized Malaysia's human rights record reveals, in part, the deep gap between Asian sensitivities and brash American ways. Leaders from Australia, Canada, Indonesia and the Philippines previously had expressed concern for the plight of imprisoned Malaysian opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is at the level of trout, eel and crustaceans that the hard work of trade negotiations is done. It is quarrels over fiberboard and Barbie dolls. And never has it been so difficult as this year. Not just because there are more than 220 types of tariffs that had to be negotiated on fish alone, more than 1,000 on chemicals. It was difficult and, ultimately, impossible at this annual Asia-Pacific trade summit to broadly agree on lower tariffs because that would mean tougher competition.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright had flown 20 hours nonstop, spent an exhausting night working the phones on Iraq, endured a numbing day of talk on trade and tariffs, and was rushing to catch another 20-hour flight home. So Albright was understandably testy Sunday afternoon when a Malaysian government minister criticized her planned meeting with the wife of Anwar Ibrahim, the former deputy prime minister who is imprisoned here on charges of sodomy and abuse of power.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After days of table pounding and hallway lobbying, Asia's premier trade club Sunday failed to find common ground on an ambitious market-opening package championed by the U.S. as a confidence-building measure for the hard-hit region. Instead, the senior ministers representing the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum agreed to disagree and passed off the trade-liberalization package to the World Trade Organization for consideration next year. The package covered nine sectors representing $1.
NEWS
November 7, 1996 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past month, officials at the Commerce Department have asserted that John Huang, the former Lippo Group executive and prodigious Democratic fund-raiser within the Asian American community, had virtually no involvement in U.S. trade policy and few dealings with Asian nations during his 18 months at the agency. They said Huang, in his role as principal deputy assistant secretary for international economic policy, was responsible for budget and personnel issues.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Change the subject from American cars to Thai rice and Sarasin Viraphol sounds a lot like Mickey Kantor. Sarasin is a senior official in Thailand's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. And like Kantor, the U.S. trade representative, he understands the frustrations of trying to export to Japan. For Thailand, the problem is rice. For years, Japan simply banned all imports of foreign rice. In late 1993, Japan lifted the ban during the last throes of negotiations on the world trade treaty known as GATT.
NEWS
July 27, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister-designate Keizo Obuchi of Japan promised U.S. officials Sunday that he would do "whatever it takes" to revitalize his nation's economy and help to reverse Asia's yearlong financial crisis. Meeting with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright here at a gathering of foreign ministers from Southeast Asia and other nations, Obuchi said he is committed to following through on a $42.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright issued a stiff warning to Asian governments Friday that they must accept the "bitter medicine" of economic reforms or face the prospect of further deterioration in the financial crisis that has swept the region. A day after jitters about Asia contributed to a significant hit on the U.S. stock market, Albright also warned that the effect of Asia's economic problems are "increasingly" being felt in economies and markets worldwide.
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