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NEWS
January 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush today reassured Australia and apprehensive Asian allies that the end of the Cold War and U.S. withdrawal from bases in the Philippines will not leave them abandoned. "We know that our security is inextricably linked to stability across the Pacific," Bush told a special session of the Australian Parliament, "and we will not put that stability and security at risk."
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BUSINESS
March 9, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even here, seemingly far away from the economic frictions between Washington and Tokyo, the Clinton Administration is finding that it cannot avoid listening to people worry about the impact of the aggressive American efforts to open up Japanese markets. In two days of talks with Australian officials, Secretary of State Warren Christopher found himself repeatedly defending the Administration's Japan policy and its tough trade stance.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Wheat Pricing Chafes: Prime Minister Bob Hawke has told the United States that relations between the two allies could be harmed by U.S. wheat sales to China. During a private dinner with U.S. Ambassador Mel Sembler, Hawke expressed annoyance at cut-rate prices that the United States is offering China, according to Hawke's office. Before going into the dinner, he said: "I've told successive American presidents that it's not friendly" and added that he would raise the issue with Sembler.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush today reassured Australia and apprehensive Asian allies that the end of the Cold War and U.S. withdrawal from bases in the Philippines will not leave them abandoned. "We know that our security is inextricably linked to stability across the Pacific," Bush told a special session of the Australian Parliament, "and we will not put that stability and security at risk."
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. aerospace firms and other manufacturers could reap huge benefits Down Under when dramatic reductions in Australia's tariffs and quotas take effect. The United States is already Australia's largest foreign investor after the United Kingdom, and the South Pacific nation represents the 10th-largest market for U.S. goods and services--notably defense, aerospace and computer products.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government refused to endorse a treaty making the South Pacific region a nuclear-free zone because of concern that it would encourage other areas to adopt similar pacts banning testing, deployment and storage of nuclear weapons, the State Department announced Thursday. Australia, the largest nation in the South Pacific region and a longtime U.S. ally, was a leading proponent of the treaty. Australian Foreign Minister Bill Hayden criticized the U.S.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush will meet with Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke and hold a state dinner for him June 27, the White House announced Wednesday. Hawke is coming to the United States June 24-28 for an official visit at Bush's invitation, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of what the United States had expected to be a breakthrough on a chemical weapons accord, the Bush Administration is coming under growing criticism from the Soviet Union, Western European allies and Third World countries for alleged foot-dragging on a new international treaty. U.S. officials had expected acclaim for simultaneous arms initiatives at meetings this week in Wyoming between Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
August 18, 1987 | United Press International
The United States will donate a $7-million American Gallery exhibit to the new National Maritime Museum in celebration of Australia's bicentennial next year, it was announced Monday.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush today began a politically daunting new year confronted with the need to persuade American voters that his trip Down Under and beyond could help resolve what is wrong back home. Indeed, Bush's four-nation Asian trip seems to be taking on the trappings of a campaign whistle-stop tour as he seizes every opportunity to drive home the message that what is good for trade is good for America. With hundreds of thousands of U.S.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 3:30 p.m. whistle shrieked across the desert as a grimy elevator cage rumbled up from cold darkness half a mile underground. But it was more than another shift change at one of Australia's richest and most fabled gold mines. After 98 years, the old Lake View mine was closing. "It's history," said George Malec, a miner for 35 years, dirt-blackened and blinking as he stepped into the sunlight. "Bitter? You bet I'm bitter.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Wheat Pricing Chafes: Prime Minister Bob Hawke has told the United States that relations between the two allies could be harmed by U.S. wheat sales to China. During a private dinner with U.S. Ambassador Mel Sembler, Hawke expressed annoyance at cut-rate prices that the United States is offering China, according to Hawke's office. Before going into the dinner, he said: "I've told successive American presidents that it's not friendly" and added that he would raise the issue with Sembler.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising the ante in a longstanding dispute, the Bush Administration announced plans Friday to bar Japanese firms from bidding on federally funded construction projects in the United States, in retaliation for Japan's refusal to let U.S. firms bid on more of its construction contracts. At the same time, the Administration officially cited China, India and Thailand for failing to protect U.S.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. aerospace firms and other manufacturers could reap huge benefits Down Under when dramatic reductions in Australia's tariffs and quotas take effect. The United States is already Australia's largest foreign investor after the United Kingdom, and the South Pacific nation represents the 10th-largest market for U.S. goods and services--notably defense, aerospace and computer products.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1990 | From Reuters
The White House on Wednesday conditionally approved U.S. participation in Australian plans for the world's first private spaceport, a project that relies on a mix of U.S. technology and Soviet rockets. Bruce Middleton of the Australian Space Office in Canberra said the authorization clears the way for Connecticut-based United Technologies Corp. to provide needed technical expertise.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 3:30 p.m. whistle shrieked across the desert as a grimy elevator cage rumbled up from cold darkness half a mile underground. But it was more than another shift change at one of Australia's richest and most fabled gold mines. After 98 years, the old Lake View mine was closing. "It's history," said George Malec, a miner for 35 years, dirt-blackened and blinking as he stepped into the sunlight. "Bitter? You bet I'm bitter.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Australia, determined to check increasing Soviet activity in the South Pacific, declared Monday that their alliance is strong and effective despite continuing friction over U.S. trade policy and French nuclear tests. Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Caspar W.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of what the United States had expected to be a breakthrough on a chemical weapons accord, the Bush Administration is coming under growing criticism from the Soviet Union, Western European allies and Third World countries for alleged foot-dragging on a new international treaty. U.S. officials had expected acclaim for simultaneous arms initiatives at meetings this week in Wyoming between Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush will meet with Australian Prime Minister Bob Hawke and hold a state dinner for him June 27, the White House announced Wednesday. Hawke is coming to the United States June 24-28 for an official visit at Bush's invitation, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
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