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NEWS
May 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
The president of the World Jewish Congress said Monday that economic hardship in Eastern Europe is causing a rise in anti-Semitism. At a news conference in West Berlin, where the group is holding its first meeting on German soil, President Edgar M. Bronfman said the countries of Eastern Europe are trying to introduce democratic change at a time of economic difficulties and that Jews once again face being singled out for attack.
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NEWS
November 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
The United States and Austria normalized relations Wednesday after a nine-month chill brought on by the rise in Austria's government of a rightist party accused of Nazi leanings. "This is a very happy moment for Austria," Foreign Minister Benita-Maria Ferrero-Waldner said after a meeting with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
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NEWS
July 29, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In a potentially explosive development in the Felix S. Bloch espionage investigation, the Austrian government announced Friday that a suspected KGB agent believed to have been Bloch's principal contact traveled frequently to Austria on a forged Finnish passport during the seven years the American diplomat served in the U.S. Embassy here.
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | PAUL WATSON and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only hours after six members of Joerg Haider's far-right Freedom Party joined Austria's federal government, the punishment began as the U.S. called home its ambassador, European governments imposed their own diplomatic sanctions, and private citizens protested and threatened boycotts.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
The Senate, as one of its last acts before recessing for the Christmas holidays, this week approved by voice vote the nomination of Henry Anatole Grunwald, retiring editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to be ambassador to Austria.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | Associated Press
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, citing what he called a "totally convincing" case, told Austria's chancellor Wednesday the United States will not lift an order barring Austrian President Kurt Waldheim for alleged involvement in Nazi crimes in World War II. Shultz met with Chancellor Franz Vranitzky for the first high-level U.S.-Austrian discussions since the Justice Department's April 27 decision to ban Waldheim from entering the United States because of his German military record.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Austria's chancellor said Thursday that in two days of meetings with U.S. leaders, including President Reagan, he received no proof that Austrian President Kurt Waldheim had a "personal, direct" involvement in Nazi war crimes. And despite assurances from the Administration that the case against Waldheim conveys no ill feeling toward Austria, Chancellor Franz Vranitzky said the decision had put his country in a "shaky light" it did not deserve.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | Associated Press
Austria said Thursday that the U.S. order barring President Kurt Waldheim has hurt relations, but Chancellor Franz Vranitzky said he will visit Washington this month as planned. Foreign Minister Alois Mock said the United States proposed "a constructive dialogue," but he indicated at a news conference that Austria will not accept the offer until it sees the evidence for Waldheim's name being put on a watch list of undesirable aliens. Atty. Gen.
NEWS
May 10, 1987
A delegation from the U.S. Department of Justice will visit Vienna on Friday to discuss the agency's decision to bar Austrian President Kurt Waldheim from traveling to the United States, a spokesman for the Austrian Chancellory said. Government sources said the Americans are coming at the request of the Austrian government and will stay one day. Waldheim was barred after a Department of Justice investigation of charges that he covered up his military service in the Balkans in World War II.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented action, the Justice Department on Monday barred Austrian President Kurt Waldheim from entering the United States, citing evidence that "clearly demonstrates" that he took part in persecuting Allied prisoners and Jews and other civilians as a German army officer during World War II. Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, with Secretary of State George P. Shultz concurring, placed the former U.N.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Austrian President Kurt Waldheim fumes at his inability to get the world to change the subject. In the palace of the Hapsburgs, where his office is situated amid jeweled artworks, priceless paintings and ornate baroque woodwork, Waldheim is like a prisoner in a gilded cage.
NEWS
May 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
The president of the World Jewish Congress said Monday that economic hardship in Eastern Europe is causing a rise in anti-Semitism. At a news conference in West Berlin, where the group is holding its first meeting on German soil, President Edgar M. Bronfman said the countries of Eastern Europe are trying to introduce democratic change at a time of economic difficulties and that Jews once again face being singled out for attack.
NEWS
August 1, 1989
The Austrian government said it does not intend to further pursue the espionage case of U.S. diplomat Felix S. Bloch. "Right now, our investigation is over," Interior Ministry spokesman Werner Sabitier said in Vienna. "If more information comes from the United States, maybe the Austrian authorities will continue their activities."
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
As the second in command at the American Embassy in Vienna, suspected spy Felix S. Bloch was in a good position to help the Soviet Union recruit other American officials to take part in espionage, a former high-level U.S. intelligence official said Sunday. Top government officials are trying to assess the damage to U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writers
On the evening of June 29, 1987, a few days before he ended a seven-year tour as a U.S. diplomat in Austria, Felix S. Bloch attended a last performance at the historic Vienna State Opera--"a personal way of saying goodby to Vienna," one of his friends recalled. The opera was Beethoven's "Fidelio," the romantic tale of a man unjustly jailed by a tyrant--and the faithful wife who disguises herself as a boy to free him.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In a potentially explosive development in the Felix S. Bloch espionage investigation, the Austrian government announced Friday that a suspected KGB agent believed to have been Bloch's principal contact traveled frequently to Austria on a forged Finnish passport during the seven years the American diplomat served in the U.S. Embassy here.
NEWS
August 1, 1989
The Austrian government said it does not intend to further pursue the espionage case of U.S. diplomat Felix S. Bloch. "Right now, our investigation is over," Interior Ministry spokesman Werner Sabitier said in Vienna. "If more information comes from the United States, maybe the Austrian authorities will continue their activities."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
A million post cards urging the Reagan Administration to bar Austrian presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim from the United States are being distributed nationwide, the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday. The Los Angeles-based center, which focuses on studies of the Holocaust, said it was handing its post cards out to its national membership as well as through synagogues and public organizations.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
U.S. investigators have asked Austrian officials and political figures, including Foreign Minister Alois Mock, to supply information about the activities of Felix S. Bloch from 1981 to 1987, when he served in Vienna, Austrian officials said Wednesday. U.S. authorities, they said, have given the names of 10 people to Interior Minister Hans Loeschnak along with a request that they be asked to describe their relations with Bloch.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
The Senate, as one of its last acts before recessing for the Christmas holidays, this week approved by voice vote the nomination of Henry Anatole Grunwald, retiring editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to be ambassador to Austria.
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