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NEWS
March 5, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Sir Lynden O. Pindling, prime minister of the Bahamas, blames racism and overzealous U.S. officials for persistent accusations that over the past decade he amassed a fortune in payoffs from drug traffickers. Pindling, a feisty and articulate London-trained lawyer who has led the country since independence from Britain in 1973, flatly denies he has ever been tainted by drug money. And he questions the motives of members of Congress and other U.S. officials who doubt him.
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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved the nominations of four Democratic loyalists to ambassadorial posts Tuesday after a four-month delay because of questions about their foreign policy expertise. M. Larry Lawrence, a San Diego developer and hotel owner, was confirmed as ambassador to Switzerland by a 76-19 vote. The other three, Sidney Williams for the Bahamas, K. Terry Dornbush for the Netherlands and Thomas Siebert for Sweden, were approved by voice vote.
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NEWS
February 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Senate approved the nominations of four Democratic loyalists to ambassadorial posts Tuesday after a four-month delay because of questions about their foreign policy expertise. M. Larry Lawrence, a San Diego developer and hotel owner, was confirmed as ambassador to Switzerland by a 76-19 vote. The other three, Sidney Williams for the Bahamas, K. Terry Dornbush for the Netherlands and Thomas Siebert for Sweden, were approved by voice vote.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Sir Lynden O. Pindling, prime minister of the Bahamas, blames racism and overzealous U.S. officials for persistent accusations that over the past decade he amassed a fortune in payoffs from drug traffickers. Pindling, a feisty and articulate London-trained lawyer who has led the country since independence from Britain in 1973, flatly denies he has ever been tainted by drug money. And he questions the motives of members of Congress and other U.S. officials who doubt him.
NEWS
September 12, 1988
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, seeking to deflect Democratic attacks on the Reagan Administration, said on NBC's "Meet the Press" that he will prosecute foreigners who traffic in illegal drugs. Thornburgh said the Justice Department was proceeding with its drug case against Panamanian strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and would pursue any other cases that involved foreign leaders if U.S. laws were broken. Democratic presidential nominee Michael S.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of a congressional drug task force, warning that he will contest the Reagan Administration's certification of the Bahamas as cooperating in anti-narcotics efforts, declared Wednesday that U.S.-bound cocaine shipments through the Bahamas have doubled in the last year and that U.S. and Bahamian authorities have ignored the problem. Rep. Larry Smith (D-Fla.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | United Press International
The ruling Progressive Liberal Party claimed victory Friday night in parliamentary elections, returning Prime Minister Lynden O. Pindling to office despite allegations of corruption. Unofficial results announced by the Parliamentary Registrar's Office, broadcast over a government-owned radio station, reported that Pindling's party had won at least 25 seats in the 49-member House of Assembly.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
A firm operated by top campaign aides to Vice President George Bush was hired in 1985 to lobby the Reagan Administration and Congress on behalf of Bahamas Prime Minister Lynden O. Pindling, then under fire over allegations of corruption and drug trafficking, a document obtained by The Times shows. The prominent Washington public relations firm of Black, Manafort, Stone & Kelly Inc.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
When the new U.S. ambassador came to Nassau to oversee American interests here, mainly the war against narcotics traffic, she did it in appropriate style. In an unspoken but blunt announcement that she was serious about her role in the drug war, Ambassador Carol Boyd Hallett chose a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration airplane to bring her over from the mainland. Hallett's pointed choice of carriers scandalized a few Bahamians. "It insulted a whole nation of people," complained Dr.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Atty. Gen. Paul Adderley said Saturday that any move by U.S. officials to seize property belonging to Carlos Lehder, the convicted cocaine smuggler, will be blocked by the Bahamian government. "You can't enforce an order on a sovereign district territory," Adderley said. "That's not legally possible unless there's an agreement." Lehder, 38, was convicted Thursday in Jacksonville, Fla., by a jury on all 11 counts of the indictments against him.
NEWS
September 12, 1988
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, seeking to deflect Democratic attacks on the Reagan Administration, said on NBC's "Meet the Press" that he will prosecute foreigners who traffic in illegal drugs. Thornburgh said the Justice Department was proceeding with its drug case against Panamanian strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and would pursue any other cases that involved foreign leaders if U.S. laws were broken. Democratic presidential nominee Michael S.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
A firm operated by top campaign aides to Vice President George Bush was hired in 1985 to lobby the Reagan Administration and Congress on behalf of Bahamas Prime Minister Lynden O. Pindling, then under fire over allegations of corruption and drug trafficking, a document obtained by The Times shows. The prominent Washington public relations firm of Black, Manafort, Stone & Kelly Inc.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Atty. Gen. Paul Adderley said Saturday that any move by U.S. officials to seize property belonging to Carlos Lehder, the convicted cocaine smuggler, will be blocked by the Bahamian government. "You can't enforce an order on a sovereign district territory," Adderley said. "That's not legally possible unless there's an agreement." Lehder, 38, was convicted Thursday in Jacksonville, Fla., by a jury on all 11 counts of the indictments against him.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
When the new U.S. ambassador came to Nassau to oversee American interests here, mainly the war against narcotics traffic, she did it in appropriate style. In an unspoken but blunt announcement that she was serious about her role in the drug war, Ambassador Carol Boyd Hallett chose a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration airplane to bring her over from the mainland. Hallett's pointed choice of carriers scandalized a few Bahamians. "It insulted a whole nation of people," complained Dr.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The chairman of a congressional drug task force, warning that he will contest the Reagan Administration's certification of the Bahamas as cooperating in anti-narcotics efforts, declared Wednesday that U.S.-bound cocaine shipments through the Bahamas have doubled in the last year and that U.S. and Bahamian authorities have ignored the problem. Rep. Larry Smith (D-Fla.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | United Press International
The ruling Progressive Liberal Party claimed victory Friday night in parliamentary elections, returning Prime Minister Lynden O. Pindling to office despite allegations of corruption. Unofficial results announced by the Parliamentary Registrar's Office, broadcast over a government-owned radio station, reported that Pindling's party had won at least 25 seats in the 49-member House of Assembly.
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