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United States Foreign Relations Balkan Countries

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NEWS
October 6, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time a cease-fire was declared for the warring Balkans, in the brittle cold of this past December, peace-broker and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter stumbled over some of the names and confused some of the parties. Yet the agreement held, at least for several weeks, largely because the Bosnian Serbs and the Muslim-led Bosnian government wanted wintertime cover to stoke their war machines and get ready for springtime offensives.
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NEWS
April 14, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a critical juncture for the Balkans, the Bush administration jumped into action this week in an attempt to prevent renewed nationalist passions from deteriorating into crises on three fronts: Bosnia, Macedonia and Kosovo. Local leaders were enthusiastic in heralding Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's three-day European swing as a potential turning point.
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NEWS
July 31, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a moment heavy with both history and hope, the United States joined with more than 50 other nations and international organizations Friday to begin the massive task of rebuilding southeastern Europe. "The war [in Kosovo] is over, we have to build a better peace for the Bosnians and all the people of southeastern Europe," President Clinton said during a daylong visit to Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina, which itself endured a bitter 3 1/2-year war earlier this decade.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a moment heavy with both history and hope, the United States joined with more than 50 other nations and international organizations Friday to begin the massive task of rebuilding southeastern Europe. "The war [in Kosovo] is over, we have to build a better peace for the Bosnians and all the people of southeastern Europe," President Clinton said during a daylong visit to Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina, which itself endured a bitter 3 1/2-year war earlier this decade.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a critical juncture for the Balkans, the Bush administration jumped into action this week in an attempt to prevent renewed nationalist passions from deteriorating into crises on three fronts: Bosnia, Macedonia and Kosovo. Local leaders were enthusiastic in heralding Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's three-day European swing as a potential turning point.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton announced Thursday that the parties in the Bosnian civil war had agreed to a cease-fire and would meet in the United States in three weeks to seek a permanent armistice--moves he hailed as a "solid step on the hard but hopeful road to peace." Clinton said the three rival groups had agreed to begin a 60-day cease-fire on Tuesday and, in a further broadening of the U.S. peacemaking role, will begin talks in the United States on Oct. 25.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin escalated his war of words against the allied bombing campaign in Bosnia on Tuesday, the Clinton Administration expressed growing concern that the Balkan conflict may upset the precarious post-Cold War relationship between Washington and Moscow. In public, U.S.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As point man for the Clinton Administration's newly emboldened policy on Bosnia, Richard Holbrooke has reasserted U.S. leadership in the Balkans and, to his undisguised satisfaction, thrust himself onto the center of the international stage. Starting as a junior foreign service officer in Vietnam more than 30 years ago, Holbrooke, now 54, has spent much of his adult life in diplomacy. It is a field that traditionally requires a certain measure of genteel anonymity.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of trying to stay clear of the deepening Balkan tragedy, the Clinton Administration seems to have taken on the daunting task of guaranteeing the survival of the precarious state that American diplomats hope to create out of the chaos of Bosnia- Herzegovina. By agreeing Thursday to play host to Bosnia peace talks, President Clinton bound his government tightly to a process that--at best--will produce a country split between bitter ethnic enemies and with an economy in tatters.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time a cease-fire was declared for the warring Balkans, in the brittle cold of this past December, peace-broker and former U.S. President Jimmy Carter stumbled over some of the names and confused some of the parties. Yet the agreement held, at least for several weeks, largely because the Bosnian Serbs and the Muslim-led Bosnian government wanted wintertime cover to stoke their war machines and get ready for springtime offensives.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton announced Thursday that the parties in the Bosnian civil war had agreed to a cease-fire and would meet in the United States in three weeks to seek a permanent armistice--moves he hailed as a "solid step on the hard but hopeful road to peace." Clinton said the three rival groups had agreed to begin a 60-day cease-fire on Tuesday and, in a further broadening of the U.S. peacemaking role, will begin talks in the United States on Oct. 25.
NEWS
October 6, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of trying to stay clear of the deepening Balkan tragedy, the Clinton Administration seems to have taken on the daunting task of guaranteeing the survival of the precarious state that American diplomats hope to create out of the chaos of Bosnia- Herzegovina. By agreeing Thursday to play host to Bosnia peace talks, President Clinton bound his government tightly to a process that--at best--will produce a country split between bitter ethnic enemies and with an economy in tatters.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin escalated his war of words against the allied bombing campaign in Bosnia on Tuesday, the Clinton Administration expressed growing concern that the Balkan conflict may upset the precarious post-Cold War relationship between Washington and Moscow. In public, U.S.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As point man for the Clinton Administration's newly emboldened policy on Bosnia, Richard Holbrooke has reasserted U.S. leadership in the Balkans and, to his undisguised satisfaction, thrust himself onto the center of the international stage. Starting as a junior foreign service officer in Vietnam more than 30 years ago, Holbrooke, now 54, has spent much of his adult life in diplomacy. It is a field that traditionally requires a certain measure of genteel anonymity.
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