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United States Foreign Relations Belarus

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NEWS
July 21, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is one thing that really annoyed Belarussian President Alexander G. Lukashenko, it was having to share the grounds of his presidential compound with foreigners. Western ambassadors, invited by Lukashenko's predecessor, lived in houses scattered all over the president's mini-Camp David. Right across his fence was the home of U.S. Ambassador Daniel Speckhard, who offended Lukashenko even more by inviting dissidents to dinner.
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NEWS
July 21, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is one thing that really annoyed Belarussian President Alexander G. Lukashenko, it was having to share the grounds of his presidential compound with foreigners. Western ambassadors, invited by Lukashenko's predecessor, lived in houses scattered all over the president's mini-Camp David. Right across his fence was the home of U.S. Ambassador Daniel Speckhard, who offended Lukashenko even more by inviting dissidents to dinner.
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NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton dropped into this most docile of former Soviet republics Saturday to give it a pat on the head and a kick in the pants. In the process, he stepped into a wasteland of fog and ice, where remnants of the Cold War linger and the faces of people on the crumbling streets are stony with continuing hardship and undimmed memories of slaughter. The pat on the head was for Belarus' quick, complete compliance with Russia's request that it give up the nuclear weapons on its territory.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton dropped into this most docile of former Soviet republics Saturday to give it a pat on the head and a kick in the pants. In the process, he stepped into a wasteland of fog and ice, where remnants of the Cold War linger and the faces of people on the crumbling streets are stony with continuing hardship and undimmed memories of slaughter. The pat on the head was for Belarus' quick, complete compliance with Russia's request that it give up the nuclear weapons on its territory.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States recommended Friday that six former Soviet republics receive full membership in the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, a move that could make them eligible for billions of dollars in loans to ease their painful transition to market economies. "The dramatic developments in the former Soviet Union have created new opportunities and challenges for international financial cooperation," Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady said in a statement.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States will recognize the independence of some of the former Soviet republics in the next 10 days and probably will recognize all of them eventually, a senior Administration official said Friday. The official declined to set a timetable for establishing diplomatic relations but said the five republics that Secretary of State James A. Baker III visited this week--Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan--will be recognized "sooner rather than later."
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