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NEWS
July 2, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
American FBI agents have helped track down members of a terrorist group wanted for a bomb attack last August on the U.S. secretary of state's motorcade and for the slaying in May of two Mormon missionaries from Utah. The self-styled Zarate Willka Armed Forces of Liberation, a Marxist group named after an obscure Indian rebel of the late 1800s, claimed responsibility for both attacks.
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NEWS
September 29, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The column of police commandos trudges down the muddy trail into the green maze of the jungle carrying rifles, shotguns, tear-gas canisters, machetes and riot shields. The baby-faced commandos, known as the Leopards, joke and grumble good-naturedly as they hurdle logs and streams. But they are ready for combat. Peasants here once ambushed police patrols with bows and arrows and crude bombs.
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NEWS
February 8, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the three Andean nations have agreed on the outlines of an anti-drug plan to be unveiled at next week's summit in Colombia, but the plan may not provide the immediate economic assistance that the South American countries had hoped for, Bush Administration officials said Wednesday. A communique to be signed by President Bush and the Andean leaders would express their common determination to replace cocaine commerce in the region with a legitimate economy.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
The U.S. ambassador to Bolivia said Friday that a jailed former interior minister has ordered his assassination in revenge for the envoy's role in bringing him to justice. The former minister, Luis Arce Gomez, is in jail in Miami, awaiting trial on drug-trafficking charges. Neither his attorney nor the prosecutor were immediately available for comment on the ambassador's allegation. The ambassador, Robert S.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The presidents of South America's three principal cocaine-producing countries on Tuesday invited President Bush to a summit within 90 days to forge joint strategies in the "frontal assault" on drug trafficking, and Bush quickly accepted the proposal. Bush expressed his willingness to take part shortly after word of the proposal by Presidents Alan Garcia of Peru, Jaime Paz Zamora of Bolivia and Virgilio Barco Vargas of Colombia reached the White House, spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "We accept.
NEWS
June 1, 1988
About 1,000 demonstrators marched through the streets of La Paz, Bolivia, chanting "Death to the United States" and "Up with coca" to protest legislation that would restrict cultivation of the plant used to make cocaine. Police reported no arrests or violence as the protesters, mostly coca farmers from the Yungas region of the Andes, passed within a block of the U.S. Embassy. The legislation, not yet signed into law, would classify coca as a controlled substance.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
The United States and the cocaine producing countries of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru tentatively agreed Sunday to include military units from each country in a stepped-up war on drugs. However, South American delegates said the agreement leaves out any language that might open the door to direct U.S. intervention in the fight. The text of the plan will be kept secret until President Bush and at least two of the South American presidents sign it at a drug summit Feb.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Saturday hailed the death of a notorious drug trafficker in a half-hour gun battle in Colombia, saying he was "delighted" that Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha had been "brought to bay." With French President Francois Mitterrand at his side after the two met on this sun-swept French Caribbean island, Bush said at a news conference that the police action that ended in Rodriguez Gacha's death was "a very courageous effort on the part of the Colombians."
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the three Andean nations have agreed on the outlines of an anti-drug plan to be unveiled at next week's summit in Colombia, but the plan may not provide the immediate economic assistance that the South American countries had hoped for, Bush Administration officials said Wednesday. A communique to be signed by President Bush and the Andean leaders would express their common determination to replace cocaine commerce in the region with a legitimate economy.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
The United States and the cocaine producing countries of Bolivia, Colombia and Peru tentatively agreed Sunday to include military units from each country in a stepped-up war on drugs. However, South American delegates said the agreement leaves out any language that might open the door to direct U.S. intervention in the fight. The text of the plan will be kept secret until President Bush and at least two of the South American presidents sign it at a drug summit Feb.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Saturday hailed the death of a notorious drug trafficker in a half-hour gun battle in Colombia, saying he was "delighted" that Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha had been "brought to bay." With French President Francois Mitterrand at his side after the two met on this sun-swept French Caribbean island, Bush said at a news conference that the police action that ended in Rodriguez Gacha's death was "a very courageous effort on the part of the Colombians."
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The presidents of South America's three principal cocaine-producing countries on Tuesday invited President Bush to a summit within 90 days to forge joint strategies in the "frontal assault" on drug trafficking, and Bush quickly accepted the proposal. Bush expressed his willingness to take part shortly after word of the proposal by Presidents Alan Garcia of Peru, Jaime Paz Zamora of Bolivia and Virgilio Barco Vargas of Colombia reached the White House, spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "We accept.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III said Wednesday that Bolivia, South America's second-largest source of cocaine, is entering a critical phase in its drive to drastically reduce its coca crop, an effort that officials hope will cut the world's cocaine supply significantly. The outcome of the anti-cocaine efforts by the continent's poorest nation could bring pressure on other major coca-producing nations, including Peru and Colombia, to expedite their own programs to combat the drug.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Valentin Quispe, an old Indian soothsayer in a blue knit cap and a green corduroy jacket, studied a scattering of coca leaves on the wool cloth at his knees and told a client, a young man, that his marriage was in trouble. "You and your woman may separate," Quispe said. "You have problems. Fight too much." The young man asked if there was another woman in his future. Quispe scattered some more coca leaves and paused. "Yes," he answered. "You will have luck with the other woman."
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
American FBI agents have helped track down members of a terrorist group wanted for a bomb attack last August on the U.S. secretary of state's motorcade and for the slaying in May of two Mormon missionaries from Utah. The self-styled Zarate Willka Armed Forces of Liberation, a Marxist group named after an obscure Indian rebel of the late 1800s, claimed responsibility for both attacks.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Valentin Quispe, an old Indian soothsayer in a blue knit cap and a green corduroy jacket, studied a scattering of coca leaves on the wool cloth at his knees and told a client, a young man, that his marriage was in trouble. "You and your woman may separate," Quispe said. "You have problems. Fight too much." The young man asked if there was another woman in his future. Quispe scattered some more coca leaves and paused. "Yes," he answered. "You will have luck with the other woman."
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