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United States Foreign Relations Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
June 30, 1995 | ART PINE and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, unable to persuade Congress to help finance a European rapid-reaction force being assembled to protect U.N. peacekeeping troops in Bosnia-Herzegovina, said Thursday that he will unilaterally use $95 million in emergency funds to support the allied effort.
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NEWS
August 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A former government minister and part-owner of a bank in which the U.S. lost $900,000 was arrested at his import-export company, Sarajevo police said, but they refused to specify the charges against Alija Delimustafic, 46. Delimustafic was interior minister and foreign trade minister during the 1992-95 Bosnian war. After the war, he became a principal owner of the BH Banka, which went bankrupt in 1998. Last month, the U.S. General Accounting Office said the U.S.
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NEWS
June 5, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On mornings when he hasn't had to fly the night before and isn't exhausted, U.S. Army helicopter pilot Melvin Dixon has been getting up at 6 a.m. lately to catch the evening network news as it's broadcast here from the United States. "I figure it must be getting interesting, because O.J. Simpson's getting to be about No.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
In a striking change from Washington's wartime sympathies, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright praised the leadership of the Serb-run half of Bosnia on Thursday, pronouncing it ahead of the rest of the country on political and economic reforms. With Bosnian Serb Prime Minister Milorad Dodik at her side, Albright said moderate forces in Republika Srpska, as the Serbian entity is known, "have been fighting the good fight. . . .
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rocket-propelled grenade fired across the busy Garden Ring Road at rush hour Wednesday blasted into the sixth floor of the U.S. Embassy in an attack by unknown assailants. No one was injured by the grenade that struck the stone exterior of the stately yellow-and-white building at 4:25 p.m., embassy spokeswoman Olivia Hilton said. The blast was absorbed by a large photocopying machine that shielded much of the interior from flying glass and fragments, she said.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Britain and France on Thursday that the allies' threat to launch air strikes in Bosnia-Herzegovina is the "last chance" for the U.N. peacekeeping force there and called for "a strong air response to raise the price of Serbian aggression." "You can't go about the world saying you're going to do something and then not do it," the President said at a news conference.
NEWS
September 7, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Sarajevo troupe's adaptation of the 1968 anti-war musical "Hair" has survived a year of bombardment to become a symbol of this integrated city's defiance of death and division. But the next show may not go on because of obstacles more formidable than artillery: the creaky bureaucracies of the U.S. government and the United Nations. More than three months ago the U.S.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton on Thursday called the Bosnian Serb assembly's rejection of a peace plan a "grave disappointment" and--in a blunt challenge to U.S. allies in Europe--demanded that the international community agree to "act quickly and decisively" against the Serbs.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | From Reuters
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, attempting to soothe American allies on Bosnia-Herzegovina, promised Saturday that Washington will not break a U.N. embargo by supplying weapons to Muslim forces. A U.S. decision to withdraw from the international naval blockade enforcing the embargo has upset countries that have troops serving with the U.N. Protection Force in Bosnia.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ultranationalist Serbs were killing Muslims in Bosnia at the rate of up to 50 at a time, then secretly cremating their bodies at night and disposing of them in a rendering plant, according to eyewitness reports that the State Department now accepts as credible. Senior U.S.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a Western strategy of aiding moderate candidates and removing extremists, Bosnian voters largely stayed true to ethnic divisions in elections earlier this month, results released Friday show. Western officials trying to transform Bosnia-Herzegovina into a multiethnic democracy took solace from the gains that some moderates posted.
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a serious setback to U.S. efforts to build a lasting peace in Bosnia, moderate nationalist Serb leader Biljana Plavsic on Monday conceded defeat to a hard-liner in this month's elections. The United States and other Western powers openly promoted Plavsic as the best alternative to more strident Serbian nationalists allied with indicted war crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With elections a few days away, Bosnia's international overlords gave this war-battered town a $1-million water-supply system this week. Then they got rid of the mayor. Schoolchildren who had gathered to sing thanks for the gift giggled as U.S. Ambassador Richard Kauzlarich mused that the 53,000-gallon storage tower looked like a giant ice cream cone.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a two-day visit to Bosnia, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday pressed national leaders to speed the return of refugees to their former homes, a step seen as vital to rebuilding the nation still deeply divided in the wake of a bitter ethnic war. "This is a tough challenge, but it must be met," Albright said at a news conference at the end of her trip.
NEWS
May 12, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior U.S. official's praise for one of Croatia's most strident nationalists has triggered a bitter diplomatic row and invited unusually harsh words from the Muslim president of Bosnia. The anger of President Alija Izetbegovic comes at a time when his cooperation is needed in delicate negotiations over refugee returns, restructuring the national media and other unresolved elements of the Bosnian peace process.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | From Reuters
Bosnia's Muslim-Croat Federation is now the focus of U.S. diplomatic efforts and needs to do much more to speed the peace process, U.S. Balkans special envoy Robert Gelbard said Saturday. After a successful meeting with Croatian President Franjo Tudjman in Zagreb, Gelbard said a new moderate government in Bosnia-Herzegovina's Serb Republic meant that it was the Muslim-Croat Federation that was now dragging its feet on implementing peace accords.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
In a striking change from Washington's wartime sympathies, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright praised the leadership of the Serb-run half of Bosnia on Thursday, pronouncing it ahead of the rest of the country on political and economic reforms. With Bosnian Serb Prime Minister Milorad Dodik at her side, Albright said moderate forces in Republika Srpska, as the Serbian entity is known, "have been fighting the good fight. . . .
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration told Congress on Wednesday that withdrawal of U.S. and other NATO troops from Bosnia-Herzegovina will hinge on "benchmarks" such as the restructuring of the police, the peaceful return of refugees to their prewar homes and the surrender of indicted war crimes suspects for trial. A senior administration official declined to predict how long the troops will have to stay but conceded that those goals won't be met quickly.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration told Congress on Wednesday that withdrawal of U.S. and other NATO troops from Bosnia-Herzegovina will hinge on "benchmarks" such as the restructuring of the police, the peaceful return of refugees to their prewar homes and the surrender of indicted war crimes suspects for trial. A senior administration official declined to predict how long the troops will have to stay but conceded that those goals won't be met quickly.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The inauguration Saturday of a relatively moderate and apparently cooperative government here in the Serb-controlled half of Bosnia opens a new chapter in the West's efforts to bring peace and stability to this war-wrecked region.
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