Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Brazil
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Brazil

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 16, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was billed as the ultimate cultural exchange: The gnarly dudes from Surf City would bop down to the land of the thong bathing suit, voodoo rites and crazy motorists and show the locals a thing or two. But it was the young surfers from middle-class Southern California households who got the education: everything from awesome traffic jams to startling images of street urchins in crime-infested slums.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 14, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazilian leaders have hardened their stance on joining a proposed hemispheric free-trade zone, saying they will agree only if the United States opens up its agricultural and steel commodities markets and modifies anti-dumping laws. Their comments over the last week are the latest in a string of Brazilian complaints that U.S. trade policy unfairly keeps the South American nation's orange juice, sugar, tobacco and steel out of the world's richest markets.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stakes are high for the United States if Brazil, Latin America's biggest economy, falls into recession, or worse, devalues its currency, a fact underscored by an unusual telephone call of support to Brazil's president Friday by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin. In a statement to reporters, Rubin said he called President Fernando Henrique Cardoso to "express U.S.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso is visiting the U.S. this week in a bid to rally support for his economic program and lure investment to help boost his country's flagging economy. He will address the United Nations Foundation, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and an Export-Import Bank conference.
NEWS
January 29, 1988
The United States publicly protested Brazil's planned $2-billion sale of missiles, tanks and other arms to Libya. The U.S. protest was also made privately last week by John C. Whitehead, deputy secretary of state, to Brazilian envoys in Washington. Brazil has defended the sale by saying it does not involve "arms of aggression."
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush embarked Sunday night on a weeklong visit to South America, seeking to promote the economic restructuring now under way throughout the continent by building support for his free-trade proposals.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz raised serious concerns with Brazilian officials Friday about aspects of Brazil's trade and foreign policies, but accomplished little more than an agreement to continue efforts to resolve the differences. Shultz's talks Friday were probably were the most important of the South American leg of his 10-day overseas trip, which also includes stops in Central America.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Reagan Administration officials are outraged at the refusal of five Latin American countries to go along with a U.S. effort in the United Nations to protest alleged human right abuses in Cuba, officials said Saturday. The U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva voted 19 to 18 on Wednesday, with six abstentions, for a motion by the Indian delegation to take no action on the U.S. proposal.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounded like a tall tale from y'all know where. Lino Meira was claiming there are 20, maybe 30 country music bands in these parts. American country music? Yup. Twenty? More, Meira reckoned. Brazilian outfits with names like Silver Dollar Company, Cowboys, American Pie, The Ugly and the Bad, American Pay Cowboys. They play at a whole bunch of Sao Paulo night spots. Like the Show Days Saloon, where Meira is manager. Tuesday night is Country Night at the Show Days.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stakes are high for the United States if Brazil, Latin America's biggest economy, falls into recession, or worse, devalues its currency, a fact underscored by an unusual telephone call of support to Brazil's president Friday by U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin. In a statement to reporters, Rubin said he called President Fernando Henrique Cardoso to "express U.S.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adding an upbeat note to a somewhat awkward visit here by President Clinton, the United States and Brazil on Tuesday announced agreements on everything from fighting crime to protecting the environment. At a news conference at Alvorada Palace, the presidential residence, Clinton and Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso applauded the two countries' cooperation as a symbol of changing relationships in the Western Hemisphere.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Air Force One touched down here, the president of the United States stepped onto hostile and uncertain turf. It was 1990: President Bush visited Argentina a day after a failed military rebellion culminated in a firefight in front of the presidential palace. The region was struggling to shake off a history of tyranny and political and economic turmoil. Anti-Americanism was so virulent that Argentine Congress members tried to declare Bush persona non grata.
NEWS
May 30, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazilian President Fernando Collor de Mello, host to the Earth Summit that begins here next week, accused industrially developed countries Friday of promoting environmental devastation for the sake of profit. Collor said that "perhaps the most perverse" form of damage, "because it is the conscious kind of devastation, is that promoted by so-called advanced societies that insist on the incessant pursuit of profit, knowing the risks to nature."
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dorival Correia Bruni, chairman of a Brazilian environmental society known as Biosfera, is dedicated to preserving the Amazon rain forest, but he disagrees with an American-led boycott of tropical hardwoods as a deterrent to forest destruction. "That kind of action doesn't contribute, in practice, to the preservation of the forest," Bruni says. Americans and other foreigners, it seems, are forever admonishing Brazilians to stop chopping down Amazon trees.
NEWS
August 16, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was billed as the ultimate cultural exchange: The gnarly dudes from Surf City would bop down to the land of the thong bathing suit, voodoo rites and crazy motorists and show the locals a thing or two. But it was the young surfers from middle-class Southern California households who got the education: everything from awesome traffic jams to startling images of street urchins in crime-infested slums.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adding an upbeat note to a somewhat awkward visit here by President Clinton, the United States and Brazil on Tuesday announced agreements on everything from fighting crime to protecting the environment. At a news conference at Alvorada Palace, the presidential residence, Clinton and Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso applauded the two countries' cooperation as a symbol of changing relationships in the Western Hemisphere.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush arrived in South America on Monday to promote democracy and better economic relations, and by the end of the day he had received a lecture on Brazil's struggle for economic development. His plans to visit Argentina later in the week, meanwhile, were briefly overshadowed by a military uprising there. "I have no thoughts of changing my plans," the President told reporters, signaling confidence in Argentina's embattled president, Carlos Saul Menem.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf War has stirred up a welter of conflicting sentiments in Latin America, making it difficult for many of the region's governments to fully support the United States and its allies. Some Latin Americans look up to the United States and Western Europe, yearning to become part of that First World clan. In contrast, however, the Latin American view of the war is often colored by anti-Yankee bias and Third World solidarity, especially among leftists and nationalists.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush arrived in South America on Monday to promote democracy and better economic relations, and by the end of the day he had received a lecture on Brazil's struggle for economic development. His plans to visit Argentina later in the week, meanwhile, were briefly overshadowed by a military uprising there. "I have no thoughts of changing my plans," the President told reporters, signaling confidence in Argentina's embattled president, Carlos Saul Menem.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|