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United States Foreign Relations Burma

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NEWS
August 12, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The United States, which in the past has given limited support to the government of Burma as part of the American campaign against illegal drugs, took steps Thursday to distance itself from the regime of military leader Sein Lwin in the midst of its bloody suppression of anti-government protests. A State Department spokesman said the situation in Burma is "very fluid," with the outcome uncertain, and the United States issued a new warning against travel to Burma. Meanwhile, U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) said Wednesday that he has worked out a compromise with House Democrats to provide $2 million in foreign aid to students who have worked to overthrow the military government of the country formerly known as Burma. The plan to offer the assistance to so-called displaced students through private, volunteer organizations, was attached to a lengthy foreign aid authorization bill being considered by the full House, Rohrabacher said. "These kids in Burma are as heroic as the ones in China," Rohrabacher said, referring to the recent democratic uprising led by Chinese students.
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NEWS
November 16, 1988 | United Press International
California Congressman-elect Dana Rohrabacher illegally entered Burma on Tuesday and promised more than 800 anti-government Burmese students receiving military training that he would seek U.S. support for their struggle for democracy. "I admire you. I admire your courage, and I admire your goals for your country," Rohrabacher said while standing in an open field near the Thai-Burmese border, which he had crossed without permission.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The United States said Thursday that it has "credible reports" that Burmese students arrested after rebelling against their country's military government died in the custody of authorities. According to recent reports from Rangoon, Burmese students who fled to the countryside when the military crushed their rebellion are being rounded up by the police and army when they return to the capital. Some of the students' families have been told that their loved ones died while in custody.
NEWS
November 20, 1988
Congressman-elect Dana Rohrabacher's apparently illegal entry into strife-torn Burma last week was part of an unofficial fact-finding trip designed to encourage "freedom fighters around the world," a former aide said. "He is acting as a private citizen and this is not being paid for at taxpayer expense," said Bob Rule, Rohrabacher's former press spokesman. Press reports indicate that Rohrabacher crossed from Thailand into Burma last Tuesday and promised anti-government students he would seek U.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Embassy in Rangoon on Wednesday ordered the evacuation of nearly 100 staff dependents after a major outbreak of looting brought the army back into the streets of Burma's capital for the first time in nearly three weeks. Ross Petzing, a spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, said the 95 dependents are being sent out of Rangoon as a "precautionary measure."
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The embattled Burmese government has "completely lost" the confidence of its people, Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) declared here Sunday night on arrival from Rangoon, the Burmese capital. "My basic impression is that the future of Burma is likely to be determined in the next week," the congressman, head of the House subcommittee on Asian affairs, said after his whirlwind 24-hour visit. "The people of Burma have already voted decisively in favor of democracy. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Lomita) said Wednesday that he has worked out a compromise with House Democrats to provide $2 million in foreign aid to students who have worked to overthrow the military government of the country formerly known as Burma. The plan to offer the assistance to so-called displaced students through private, volunteer organizations, was attached to a lengthy foreign aid authorization bill being considered by the full House, Rohrabacher said. "These kids in Burma are as heroic as the ones in China," Rohrabacher said, referring to the recent democratic uprising led by Chinese students.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The United States said Thursday that it has "credible reports" that Burmese students arrested after rebelling against their country's military government died in the custody of authorities. According to recent reports from Rangoon, Burmese students who fled to the countryside when the military crushed their rebellion are being rounded up by the police and army when they return to the capital. Some of the students' families have been told that their loved ones died while in custody.
NEWS
September 16, 1988
Tens of thousands of demonstrators, with hundreds of soldiers joining in, crowded the streets of Rangoon, capital of Burma, to demand democracy. Sources said the U.S. Embassy refused student leaders' requests for weapons but offered moral support. Police shot at looters and killed two people, Radio Rangoon said. The government of President Maung Maung has said it will end one-party rule and hold the first multi-party elections since 1960, possibly as soon as October.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Congressman-elect Dana Rohrabacher returned Friday from a controversial tour of Burma and Afghanistan and said he hopes that the trip "will serve me well in Congress." Rohrabacher, a Republican elected earlier this month to represent Long Beach and west Orange County, has said he wants to be appointed to the House Foreign Affairs Committee. He said he will meet with officials from the National Security Council and State Department next week to brief them on the two-week trip.
NEWS
November 20, 1988
Congressman-elect Dana Rohrabacher's apparently illegal entry into strife-torn Burma last week was part of an unofficial fact-finding trip designed to encourage "freedom fighters around the world," a former aide said. "He is acting as a private citizen and this is not being paid for at taxpayer expense," said Bob Rule, Rohrabacher's former press spokesman. Press reports indicate that Rohrabacher crossed from Thailand into Burma last Tuesday and promised anti-government students he would seek U.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | United Press International
California Congressman-elect Dana Rohrabacher illegally entered Burma on Tuesday and promised more than 800 anti-government Burmese students receiving military training that he would seek U.S. support for their struggle for democracy. "I admire you. I admire your courage, and I admire your goals for your country," Rohrabacher said while standing in an open field near the Thai-Burmese border, which he had crossed without permission.
NEWS
September 16, 1988
Tens of thousands of demonstrators, with hundreds of soldiers joining in, crowded the streets of Rangoon, capital of Burma, to demand democracy. Sources said the U.S. Embassy refused student leaders' requests for weapons but offered moral support. Police shot at looters and killed two people, Radio Rangoon said. The government of President Maung Maung has said it will end one-party rule and hold the first multi-party elections since 1960, possibly as soon as October.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Embassy in Rangoon on Wednesday ordered the evacuation of nearly 100 staff dependents after a major outbreak of looting brought the army back into the streets of Burma's capital for the first time in nearly three weeks. Ross Petzing, a spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, said the 95 dependents are being sent out of Rangoon as a "precautionary measure."
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The embattled Burmese government has "completely lost" the confidence of its people, Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) declared here Sunday night on arrival from Rangoon, the Burmese capital. "My basic impression is that the future of Burma is likely to be determined in the next week," the congressman, head of the House subcommittee on Asian affairs, said after his whirlwind 24-hour visit. "The people of Burma have already voted decisively in favor of democracy. . . .
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Congressman-elect Dana Rohrabacher returned Friday from a controversial tour of Burma and Afghanistan and said he hopes that the trip "will serve me well in Congress." Rohrabacher, a Republican elected earlier this month to represent Long Beach and west Orange County, has said he wants to be appointed to the House Foreign Affairs Committee. He said he will meet with officials from the National Security Council and State Department next week to brief them on the two-week trip.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The United States, which in the past has given limited support to the government of Burma as part of the American campaign against illegal drugs, took steps Thursday to distance itself from the regime of military leader Sein Lwin in the midst of its bloody suppression of anti-government protests. A State Department spokesman said the situation in Burma is "very fluid," with the outcome uncertain, and the United States issued a new warning against travel to Burma. Meanwhile, U.S.
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