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United States Foreign Relations Cambodia

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October 24, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives of 19 nations, including the United States, signed an international peace agreement on Wednesday, ending 21 years of conflict in Cambodia and placing the Southeast Asian country under U.N. administration until general elections can be held in 1993. The assignment, with a cost estimated at $2 billion, is the biggest, most expensive ever for the United Nations. Under the agreement, U.N.
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NEWS
October 23, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Senate left town this week without confirming two ambassadorial nominees from California to posts in Micronesia and Cambodia. Left off a last-minute confirmation list approved Wednesday were five-term state Sen. Diane Watson of Los Angeles and Kent M. Wiedemann of San Mateo. Watson, forced to give up her seat in Sacramento at the end of this year because of term limits, appeared before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Sept. 25.
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NEWS
July 12, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday was a day of reckoning for Sebastian Marot. The 32-year-old Frenchman, who feeds 500 Cambodian street children each day, has been informed that the Australian aid agency that funds his program is freezing aid to this beleaguered country in the wake of last weekend's coup. Unless other donors rally to the rescue, Marot said, his money will run out within three months. Other aid groups were also reeling Friday after the U.S.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Wednesday that it will not recognize the parliamentary election of Ung Huot as Cambodia's first prime minister because of the "great atmosphere of intimidation" that, according to senior U.S. officials, prevented about 17% of the nation's legislators from voting. But the statement fell short of a formal rejection of Cambodia's new co-leader.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Malaysia on Friday to begin talks on how to defuse the Cambodian crisis, an effort that U.S. officials now concede may be prolonged and whose results may not be fully realized until scheduled parliamentary elections next year. Albright will meet over the next three days with counterparts in the Assn.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 16 years after the last American diplomat fled Cambodia at a moment of crushing defeat in Indochina, a U.S. envoy arrived here on Monday to re-establish a permanent mission in the former Communist country. "This is a historic occasion," said Charles H. Twining, the U.S. special representative to Cambodia's new coalition government. "We are about to embark upon the implementation of a plan that will lead to a new era in Cambodian history."
NEWS
July 16, 1990
Imagine that a movement started in America to repeal the Bill of Rights and establish a religious dictatorship, creating slavery of blacks and women. Though this is a minority view, the debate rages. Would we have to endure a four-part epic on whether the media are being fair enough to the would-be slave masters? Would we have to listen to their cries that they're being "stereotyped?"
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright chose former Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) to help deal with the crisis in Cambodia, where Second Prime Minister Hun Sen has taken power by ousting First Prime Minister Norodom Ranariddh. The State Department said Solarz, who once chaired the House East Asia Subcommittee, would hold talks in Japan, China, Thailand and Indonesia before visiting Cambodia. Solarz will report his findings to Albright before she meets with leaders of the Assn.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite his often defiant public words, Cambodian strongman Hun Sen is showing signs of flexibility on key principles required for a settlement of the Cambodian crisis, the U.S. special envoy to Cambodia told Secretary of State Madeleine Albright here Saturday. The apparent softening in the Cambodian leader's stance has triggered the first tentative optimism among U.S.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of U.S. forensic experts will travel to Cambodia this month to search for remains of servicemen missing since the Vietnam War, marking the first time that the Phnom Penh government has ever cooperated in such an effort, the State Department announced Friday.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite his often defiant public words, Cambodian strongman Hun Sen is showing signs of flexibility on key principles required for a settlement of the Cambodian crisis, the U.S. special envoy to Cambodia told Secretary of State Madeleine Albright here Saturday. The apparent softening in the Cambodian leader's stance has triggered the first tentative optimism among U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Malaysia on Friday to begin talks on how to defuse the Cambodian crisis, an effort that U.S. officials now concede may be prolonged and whose results may not be fully realized until scheduled parliamentary elections next year. Albright will meet over the next three days with counterparts in the Assn.
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the strongest indication yet that the United States plans to play hardball with Cambodia's current leadership, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright pledged Wednesday to use U.S. leverage to ensure that Second Prime Minister Hun Sen restores the country's previous coalition government and observes the rule of law.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright chose former Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) to help deal with the crisis in Cambodia, where Second Prime Minister Hun Sen has taken power by ousting First Prime Minister Norodom Ranariddh. The State Department said Solarz, who once chaired the House East Asia Subcommittee, would hold talks in Japan, China, Thailand and Indonesia before visiting Cambodia. Solarz will report his findings to Albright before she meets with leaders of the Assn.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | JIM MANN
An old ritual was played out in Washington last week. The ousted leader of a foreign government came to town, making the rounds to plead for U.S. support and help in regaining the power he has just lost. This time, the leader is Prince Norodom Ranariddh of Cambodia, head of a government that was democratically elected in 1993. He was deposed earlier this month in a coup d'etat by Second Prime Minister Hun Sen. Ranariddh was following a well-trodden path.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friday was a day of reckoning for Sebastian Marot. The 32-year-old Frenchman, who feeds 500 Cambodian street children each day, has been informed that the Australian aid agency that funds his program is freezing aid to this beleaguered country in the wake of last weekend's coup. Unless other donors rally to the rescue, Marot said, his money will run out within three months. Other aid groups were also reeling Friday after the U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From United Press International
Cambodian officials and U.S. experts agreed Wednesday to repatriate six sets of remains, including four found in a Khmer Rouge "killing field." All are believed to be Americans missing since the war in Indochina. The remains will be flown out today. The first return of possible American remains follows a change in U.S. policy ending American diplomatic support for the Khmer Rouge-dominated resistance coalition, but officials said Wednesday's decision was "purely humanitarian."
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will open its first formal talks with the government of Cambodia in more than a decade as the Bush Administration expands efforts to end that country's long-running civil war, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Wednesday. The talks, scheduled to take place in Laos, which borders Cambodia, are "the next logical step" in an effort that began in mid-July, Baker said.
NEWS
July 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Frightened by the death of a second opposition figure, opponents of coup leader Hun Sen scrambled Wednesday to get on planes evacuating hundreds of foreigners from Cambodia. Menacing soldiers, some clearly drunk, roamed the streets here in the capital looking for others to arrest. Meanwhile, the United States ordered all but 20 of its diplomats out of the country and urged more than 1,000 other Americans to leave, saying the U.S. government can't guarantee their safety.
NEWS
July 9, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States on Tuesday condemned Cambodian leader Hun Sen for seizing power by force last weekend and urged the country's political factions to resolve their differences peacefully. Meanwhile, as Hun Sen's troops moved to consolidate control, reports from the beleaguered capital sketched scenes of widespread arrests and at least one execution.
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