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October 21, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after their flag was displayed upside-down at Game 2 of the World Series between the Atlanta Braves and Toronto Blue Jays, thousands of Canadians loudly responded Tuesday night before Game 3. They stood and sang the U.S. national anthem. They sang it louder than it was sung in Atlanta last weekend, and when Jon Secada sang "land of the free," they erupted in cheers.
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NEWS
March 25, 2001 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a country where national identity rests less on being Canadian than on not being American, having to turn to the U.S. to ease its latest crisis could hardly be worse. Canada, you see, is short of sperm. Last March, the nation's health authority--Health Canada--quarantined the country's sperm banks after a woman contracted chlamydia, a common sexually transmitted disease that can cause sterility, from a donor sample.
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NEWS
January 21, 1991 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada mounted its first official offensive missions of the Persian Gulf War on Sunday, intensifying controversy in Canada about this normally noninterventionist country's role in the fighting. It was the first time in 40 years--since the Korean War--that Canadian forces have been sent into battle, and the shift has been traumatic for many. Canadian CF-18 warplanes took off from their wartime base in the Persian Gulf sheikdom of Qatar to join U.S.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first official foray into foreign policy, President Bush held talks with Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien at the White House on Monday in a meeting that was largely a get-acquainted session. But the working dinner with the leader of America's neighbor and largest trading partner underscored the widening gap between the new administration and its closest ally on key economic and defense issues, from drilling for oil in the Arctic to a national missile shield.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | Associated Press
The remains of 28 American soldiers killed in the War of 1812 were taken from Canada to their native soil in flag-draped coffins Thursday in the first repatriation ceremony held between the two countries. "There can be no finer expression of the good relations between our countries than the reverence we show for these men," George Hees, Canadian minister of veterans affairs, said as he transferred possession of the remains to U.S. officials. The ceremony took place near Old Ft.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the winds of division still rustling through the bronzed maples of Quebec, President Clinton met here Friday with the province's champion of independence but hewed throughout the day to the United States' support for Canadian unity. It was the first meeting between a U.S. president and a separatist premier. Offering only an allusion--but an unmistakable reference nonetheless--to the dispute that has roiled Canada for generations, Clinton said at the dedication of a new U.S.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., Canada Wrap Up Lumber Accord: U.S. and Canadian negotiators ended a long-running and bitter trade dispute on Tuesday by concluding an agreement slowing Canadian shipments of softwood lumber to the United States. The five-year pact, which was effective Monday, differs significantly from an agreement in principle by the two sides in February.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
OH, CANADA: The health care debate has gone international, causing a strain between the United States and one of its best and oldest foreign friends. . . . That would be Canada, whose single-payer health care system, favored by some Democrats, is the target of loud and consistent Administration criticism. One particularly vocal complainer: Constance Horner, the former undersecretary of Health and Human Services who is now White House personnel chief.
NEWS
September 7, 1992
I tuned into Channel 11 on Aug. 30 expecting to see the Emmy Awards. Although I shouldn't have been surprised, it appeared that I was watching another Democratic convention. Frankly, I thought the first one was funnier! SUE LAGERLOF Irvine
BUSINESS
May 18, 1992 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, the United States and Canada signed a free-trade agreement that both sides envisioned as a step into the marketplace of the future, pushing aside centuries-old trading rivalries and ultimately expanding to connect all the nations of the Western Hemisphere. But as President Bush and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney prepare to meet here this week as leaders of the world's largest trading partners, the atmosphere between the two countries is far from utopian. Although the U.S.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the winds of division still rustling through the bronzed maples of Quebec, President Clinton met here Friday with the province's champion of independence but hewed throughout the day to the United States' support for Canadian unity. It was the first meeting between a U.S. president and a separatist premier. Offering only an allusion--but an unmistakable reference nonetheless--to the dispute that has roiled Canada for generations, Clinton said at the dedication of a new U.S.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
For international economic relationships and hemispheric free-trade agreements, Canada has become a pioneer and a model for other nations adapting to the modern, global economy. More than a decade ago, Canada made a courageous decision to seek a free-trade agreement with the United States. The neighboring nations already had the largest trade relationship in the world because Canada bought more U.S. goods and services--$74 billion a year at that time--than Japan or any other country. And the U.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1999 | Washington Post
The U.S. and Canada announced an agreement on salmon fishing in the Pacific, in a pact designed to end a decades-long dispute over harvesting of the fish. At the heart of the accord is the establishment of a new regime for setting quotas under the 1985 Pacific Salmon Treaty that is flexible, basing it on how abundant the fish are each year rather than fixed annual limits.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first visit to Canada in a decade by a U.S. secretary of State, Madeleine Albright on Tuesday announced new steps to resolve one of the few bitter disputes dividing the two neighbors--a fight over lucrative fishing rights for the Pacific salmon. Speaking at a news conference after spending much of the day with Lloyd Axworthy, her Canadian counterpart, Albright said that newly appointed Canadian and U.S.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, the Justice Department gloated: In a rare victory in a Canadian court, it had succeeded in freezing $152 million in assets belonging to a flamboyant promoter linked to Colorado's most polluted gold mine. Authorities had hoped back in 1996 to use the funds to clean up the Summitville Mine, which threatened to spill 200 million gallons of water laced with cyanide and heavy metals into the streams and irrigation canals that nourish this poor farming community.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Lloyd Axworthy announced in October that Canada would spearhead an effort for an international treaty banning land mines by the end of 1997, U.S. State Department officials privately wrote the move off as naive posturing. Washington estimated that just 40 to 50 countries--none military powers--would ever sign such a pact. Even here in the Canadian capital, the forecast was pessimistic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney will deliver a foreign policy address Monday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley. Mulroney will present the speech during his first visit to the United States since announcing that he will step down in June from the top Canadian leadership post. During the program, which will not be open to the public, former President Reagan will pay tribute to Mulroney, who has been prime minister for more than eight years.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | Reuters
Gen. John de Chastelain, chief of Canada's defense staff, has been named ambassador to the United States, the government announced Wednesday. De Chastelain, 55, will replace Derek Burney.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton abruptly shifted tactics Monday in the dispute over how to curb the use of land mines worldwide, agreeing to join Canadian-led talks aimed at securing no-use pledges from the United States and other key countries. Rather than waiting for a firm global ban, the White House announced that the United States will participate in the Canadian-sponsored negotiations--scheduled to begin in Oslo on Sept. 1--with hopes of signing a scaled-back no-use treaty in Ottawa by December.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Thorstenson wryly calls it "the 56-hour fish war." When the season opened on U.S. pink salmon in southeast Alaska earlier this month, about 100 U.S. fishermen in boats along Noyes Island had precisely 56 hours to fish their faces off. That was the time allowed by U.S. regulators after a breakdown in talks for renewal of the 1985 U.S.-Canada salmon treaty, which was designed to fairly divide fishing rights while also conserving species.
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