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United States Foreign Relations Central America

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January 11, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Honduran troops began their latest round of joint military maneuvers Saturday in this country's tense southern border region not far from the scene of recent fighting between Nicaraguan troops and anti-Sandinista rebels. About 220 soldiers from the 27th Engineers Brigade of the U.S. Army's 20th Combat Airborne Force based at Ft. Bragg, N.C., parachuted from C-141 transport airplanes for an exercise that will upgrade the U.S.
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NEWS
July 9, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 1990s, the U.S. presence in Central America faded like the paint that demonstrators had sprayed on walls during the previous decade: "Yankee Go Home." The Cold War ended; the leftist guerrillas that Americans had helped fight signed peace agreements and turned themselves into political parties. The isthmus was no longer of much military interest. Now the Yankees are back. In what critics call a militarization of the drug war, U.S.
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NEWS
March 21, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's White House staff, rekindling the rancor of the 1980 election campaign, denounced former President Jimmy Carter on Friday for criticizing Administration policy in a speech in Cairo. "We are deeply disappointed by his comments," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "If he wants to be helpful in the area of foreign affairs, he might want to forgo criticism of U.S. leaders while he's on foreign soil."
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drug enforcement officials Wednesday unveiled the results of what they called the biggest international effort ever to stem the tidal wave of Colombian drugs flowing through the Caribbean to U.S. shores. Dubbed "Operation Conquistador," the 17-day crackdown that ended Sunday involved 26 Caribbean and Central and South American countries, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan ordered 3,200 additional U.S. troops to Honduras on Wednesday as a show of force in response to a Nicaraguan incursion into the country, the White House announced. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said units of the 7th Infantry Division based at Ft. Ord, Calif., and the 82nd Airborne Division based at Ft. Bragg, N.C., are leaving for Honduras today on "an emergency deployment readiness exercise."
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Nicaragua proposed on Saturday that the cease-fire to be negotiated in its war with U.S.-backed contras require the insurgents to surrender their arms at once and consider an offer of amnesty. The proposal differs sharply from that of the Nicaraguan Resistance, as the contras formally call themselves, which seeks to freeze the battlefield positions of armed guerrillas and the Sandinista army until international supervisors verify Managua's compliance with promised democratic reforms.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Oscar Arias Sanchez said Thursday that the Sandinista rulers in Nicaragua are "bad guys" who have "unmasked themselves" as anti-democratic and deserve to be punished for breaking the Central American peace agreement. In his harshest criticism of the Sandinistas, the author of the peace accord said he was prepared to urge non-military pressures on them to resume peace talks with U.S.-backed Contras and end political repression. He did not spell out any proposed sanctions.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | Baltimore Sun
A newly declassified CIA training manual details torture methods used against suspected subversives in Central America during the 1980s, casting doubt on agency claims that no such methods were taught there. "Human Resource Exploitation Training Manual--1983" was released in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. The CIA also declassified a Vietnam-era training manual that also taught torture and is believed to have been a basis for the 1983 manual.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major address before El Salvador's Legislative Assembly, U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Monday called for stronger ties between the United States and Central America to expand trade and strengthen still-struggling democracies in the region. He also pledged greater U.S. support on crime and counter-narcotics programs, immigration issues and environmental problems to consolidate recent political and economic gains.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III offered Monday to orchestrate an international search for financial aid to Central America's impoverished civilian democracies and their newly formed economic community.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, the leaders of six Central American nations and the head of the Dominican Republic agreed Thursday on the need to find "humanitarian solutions" to the problems posed by migration to the United States and pledged to work together to eliminate remaining trade barriers.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether poring over ancient artifacts, singing Spanish tunes with Mexican children or touring a tropical rain forest during a steady shower, President Clinton has managed to escape the pressures of the issues facing him on his Latin American journey and relax. The president's enthusiasm for his travels was especially evident in Mexico, the first stop of his weeklong journey.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | Baltimore Sun
A newly declassified CIA training manual details torture methods used against suspected subversives in Central America during the 1980s, casting doubt on agency claims that no such methods were taught there. "Human Resource Exploitation Training Manual--1983" was released in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. The CIA also declassified a Vietnam-era training manual that also taught torture and is believed to have been a basis for the 1983 manual.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major address before El Salvador's Legislative Assembly, U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Monday called for stronger ties between the United States and Central America to expand trade and strengthen still-struggling democracies in the region. He also pledged greater U.S. support on crime and counter-narcotics programs, immigration issues and environmental problems to consolidate recent political and economic gains.
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico and all seven Central American countries have carried out what a U.S. official Friday called the biggest multinational counternarcotics blitz in history. The 10-day operation enlisted the Mexican army, navy and police forces to seize more than five tons of cocaine, nearly 40 tons of marijuana, two aircraft, six ships and more than 650 suspected drug traffickers in Mexico alone. In unveiling the operation, confirmed Friday by Mexican authorities, U.S.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students waiting for the bus to the Vicente Caceres Central Institute here were stunned one morning to be surrounded by Honduran soldiers brandishing automatic weapons. The soldiers went down the line, picked out older teen-age boys and herded them onto trucks. By the time they should have been in class, 400 boys rounded up at several bus stops were being inducted into the army.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An advisory panel will recommend to Congress next month the use of foreign aid to curtail illegal immigration from parts of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, according to a New York Times report. The 12-member Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development, headed by Diego Asencio, a former ambassador to Brazil and Colombia, concluded that some U.S.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Nicaragua can hold a free election and cope with the results, Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez said last weekend, "Central America will be a very different place." Arias, the architect of the peace talks that led to Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's surprise election Sunday as president of Nicaragua, already has seen his prediction come true.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III offered Monday to orchestrate an international search for financial aid to Central America's impoverished civilian democracies and their newly formed economic community.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The presidents of five Central American nations, emerging from a decade of violent conflict and deepening poverty, agreed Sunday night on an ambitious plan to integrate their economies. The accord calls for setting up an Economic Community of the Central American Isthmus to coordinate every aspect of development--including trade policy, debt management, food production, environmental protection and the quest for foreign aid.
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