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United States Foreign Relations Central Asia

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NEWS
February 16, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his arrival in Uzbekistan on Saturday, Secretary of State James A. Baker III has visited every republic of the former Soviet Union except for strife-torn Georgia, an endurance record so far unmatched by any other foreign minister. Washington's objective is clear. As a senior Administration official told reporters traveling with Baker: "It is important that we have a presence so that we can exert some influence." But influence on whom and to what end?
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BUSINESS
October 7, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In the war against terrorism, the United States will become involved in economic development in Central Asia and in building closer economic ties with Russia, marking a new chapter for the world economy. Russia's quick support for U.S. policies and military needs in the wake of Sept. 11 has "defined" a new relationship between the two nations, Condoleezza Rice, national security advisor to President Bush, told a Washington meeting of the U.S.-Russia Business Council last week.
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BUSINESS
October 7, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In the war against terrorism, the United States will become involved in economic development in Central Asia and in building closer economic ties with Russia, marking a new chapter for the world economy. Russia's quick support for U.S. policies and military needs in the wake of Sept. 11 has "defined" a new relationship between the two nations, Condoleezza Rice, national security advisor to President Bush, told a Washington meeting of the U.S.-Russia Business Council last week.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his arrival in Uzbekistan on Saturday, Secretary of State James A. Baker III has visited every republic of the former Soviet Union except for strife-torn Georgia, an endurance record so far unmatched by any other foreign minister. Washington's objective is clear. As a senior Administration official told reporters traveling with Baker: "It is important that we have a presence so that we can exert some influence." But influence on whom and to what end?
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