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United States Foreign Relations Chile

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NEWS
December 7, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen years after a coup overthrew a democratically elected government strongly opposed by the United States, President Bush on Thursday saluted the re-establishment of Chilean democracy, which he said has been "every bit as far-reaching" as the revolutions that overthrew Communist governments in Eastern Europe last year. "In Chile, once more, the people shall govern," Bush said in a speech to the Chilean Congress.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | Associated Press
President Clinton and Chilean President Ricardo Lagos, commenting from opposite coasts, said Wednesday their countries have initiated talks on a free trade agreement and agreed that formal negotiations should start as soon as possible. Lagos, on a U.S. tour to attract technology investment in his country, announced the talks during a lunchtime speech in the heart of Silicon Valley.
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NEWS
October 8, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
When voters in Chile chose the uncertainties of democracy over a continuation of strongman rule by Gen. Augusto Pinochet, they started a drawn out process that will provide a severe test for the patience and skill of the next U.S. president. The Reagan Administration has maintained steady pressure on Chile to hold free and fair elections, and American officials immediately hailed Wednesday's plebiscite, in which voters rejected Pinochet's bid for eight more years as president, as just that.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Newly declassified U.S. government documents establish a link between former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet and two men convicted in the September 1976 assassination in Washington of Chile's onetime top diplomat. The documents state that Pinochet telephoned Paraguayan President Alfredo Stroessner to ask that he provide passports to two agents of Chile's secret police, who ultimately used Chilean passports to enter the United States.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government has demanded that Chile pay $12 million in damages to relatives of Orlando Letelier, a Chilean exile leader, and his American co-worker, Ronni Moffitt, who were killed by a car bomb on Washington's Embassy Row in 1976, the State Department said Thursday. Department spokesman Charles Redman said the U.S.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Federal officials on Friday strongly defended the method they have chosen to ensure that fruit imported from Chile is safe, saying that a random sampling of 5% of the grapes and berries should be enough to detect any poison. But many of the details of the inspection system must still be worked out and the fact remains that, even when the system finally is in place, 95% of the fruit will not be looked at by inspectors.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | Associated Press
The State Department on Thursday praised the lifting of restrictions on civil liberties in Chile and expressed hope that the action will lead to additional steps that will allow "the full and free expression of popular will."
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
It was the sort of Southern California day that makes you think about going to the beach--warm, gloriously sunny and perfect for spring break. In La Habra, Tracy Zaragoza and Oscar Cobian spent Thursday indoors, bundled up in heavy jackets and wearing white plastic gloves. They and three high school classmates had driven the 2 hours from Oxnard to Christian Salvesen, a cold-storage warehouse.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor held out little hope Thursday that an agreement can be completed to bring Chile into the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1996. The key obstacle, Kantor said, is the difficulty of gaining from the U.S. Congress the crucial negotiating authority needed to expand the agreement with Mexico and Canada to include Chile.
NEWS
July 1, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government made public Wednesday thousands of classified documents concerning the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, raising hopes that new information will aid the prosecution of Pinochet by a Spanish judge and shed light on the U.S. role in Chile's bloody past.
NEWS
July 1, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government made public Wednesday thousands of classified documents concerning the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile, raising hopes that new information will aid the prosecution of Pinochet by a Spanish judge and shed light on the U.S. role in Chile's bloody past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1999
Chileans in Los Angeles demonstrated Friday night to urge the Clinton administration to support efforts to prosecute former Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet, who will try to fight extradition to Spain at a hearing Monday in London. "Justice Must Reign--Send Him to Spain!" chanted the more than 60 demonstrators, who marched holding candles and Chilean flags in front of the Federal Building in Westwood.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, reflecting divisions within the Clinton administration, Monday recommended that other nations respect Chile's demand that Britain not extradite former dictator Augusto Pinochet to Spain. But she did not support the demand outright. "I'm not in the business of giving advice on this," Albright said when asked what she had advised the British. "I think we're not prepared to make a statement about the merits of the case."
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton launched a four-day Chilean visit Thursday by agreeing with President Eduardo Frei to cooperate on climate change, financial-market stability and other issues in a global economy. But it was on a more down-to-earth level that Clinton sought to explain the ties that bind Chileans and Americans--on issues such as schools, child care, jobs and access to credit.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor held out little hope Thursday that an agreement can be completed to bring Chile into the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1996. The key obstacle, Kantor said, is the difficulty of gaining from the U.S. Congress the crucial negotiating authority needed to expand the agreement with Mexico and Canada to include Chile.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chilean television report was titled "The FBI in Action," and it started with some hard-hitting footage of Kevin Costner and Sean Connery in the movie "The Untouchables." But the main focus of the TV report was the intense Chilean debate over plans to create an FBI office in the U.S. Embassy here. The plan has brought protests from both the right and left, based on fears that the FBI may violate Chile's sovereignty by conducting investigations, operations or arrests in this country.
NEWS
March 18, 1989
While Armand Hammer's "museum grows in Westwood," hordes of mentally ill, hungry and homeless humans are growing as well. You will pardon me if I do not cry "Hallelujah!" at Mr. Hammer's gift to humanity and himself. If he wants to "build a permanent reminder of his accomplishments" let him build schools, hospitals and housing for the destitute instead of spending millions on a memorial for himself. SHIRLEY WOLF Santa Monica
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | Associated Press
The State Department said Monday it has told Chilean President Augusto Pinochet's government of its serious concern that he may cancel the vote on whether he should stay in power until 1997. "We have heard reports that the Chilean government has plans to cancel Wednesday's plebiscite or to nullify the result," spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley told reporters. "We view them with serious concern.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
The families of the late Chilean Ambassador Orlando Letelier and his aide Ronnie Moffitt will share in a $2.6-million settlement under a decision announced Saturday by the State Department. The money will be paid by the government of Chile to the U.S. government for distribution to the families affected by the 1976 car bombing in Washington that killed Letelier and Moffitt. Part of the money also will go to Michael Moffitt, who was injured in the blast. The Moffitts were married.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf War has stirred up a welter of conflicting sentiments in Latin America, making it difficult for many of the region's governments to fully support the United States and its allies. Some Latin Americans look up to the United States and Western Europe, yearning to become part of that First World clan. In contrast, however, the Latin American view of the war is often colored by anti-Yankee bias and Third World solidarity, especially among leftists and nationalists.
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