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United States Foreign Relations China

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NEWS
September 15, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the 1960s, the CIA provided the Tibetan exile movement with $1.7 million a year for operations against China, including an annual subsidy of $180,000 for the Dalai Lama, according to newly released U.S. intelligence documents. The money for the Tibetans and the Dalai Lama was part of the CIA's worldwide effort during the height of the Cold War to undermine Communist governments, particularly in the Soviet Union and China. In fact, the U.S.
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NEWS
February 22, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush today called for an end to religious persecution in China, less than 24 hours after Chinese President Jiang Zemin asserted that "religious faiths are protected by our constitution." In a nationally televised address here, Bush also called for free elections "all the way to the national level."
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NEWS
October 10, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The breathtaking change seemed to come from nowhere. Three months ago, Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui ushered in an era of heightened confrontation in East Asia by redefining Taiwan's relationship to China as that of one state to another. His statement--which he refused to retract and was scheduled to repeat in a National Day address early today--raised the possibility of military action by China, which claims Taiwan as part of its own territory.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's the man who launched a thousand puns, virtually all of them the same, by writers who play on his surname by asking: "Hu's on first?" The man they're referring to is Hu Jintao, China's vice president, and by all accounts, he is indeed on first, waiting in the wings to succeed President Jiang Zemin as the man leading this nation of 1.3 billion people.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | EDWARD IWATA, Iwata, a San Francisco writer, is a frequent contributor to View. and
Relaxing in the kitchen of his small apartment, Fei Ye recalled the screams of fellow Chinese prisoners. "We all saw and heard the torture," said Fei, 28, a writer and translator of Russian poetry who was active in the Democracy Movement in China. Fei was arrested in 1983 for printing a banned literary journal called Lone Army. A Communist Party loyalist had spotted him editing the journal in a classroom in Harbin, a city in Heilongjiang, China's northernmost province.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | JAMES BATES and MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like modern-day Marco Polos with cellular phones, Hollywood executives are venturing to China seeking the same kind of profits they reaped exporting fantasy to the rest of the world. But despite China's promise of 1.3 billion potential customers, a burgeoning middle class enamored of entertainment, a flourishing creative community and a growing, less shackled economy, the largest untapped market for American movies and TV shows remains maddeningly out of reach.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Chinese company that was ordered by President Bush to sell a Seattle aircraft parts company protested the decision Monday, saying it would jeopardize Sino-U.S. relationships in the aviation industry. The state-owned China National Aero-Technology Import and Export Corp. (or CATIC) said the divestiture order "will undoubtedly cause negative impact on future cooperation between the aviation industries of the two countries." Citing national security considerations, Bush ordered CATIC on Feb.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even as they reached agreement on a variety of issues, President Clinton and Chinese President Jiang Zemin engaged Saturday in an unprecedented public debate on human rights, aired live to hundreds of millions of Chinese on national television, that revitalized what had begun as a problem-plagued summit. "I think this has been quite an extraordinary day in the evolution of U.S.-China relations," declared Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger, Clinton's national security advisor.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, it's China's turn to feel needed. Thanks to India's surprise nuclear tests last week, the geopolitical axis has twisted overnight, putting China in a diplomatic position similar to the critical one it enjoyed and exploited during the Cold War.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contrary to the upbeat White House commentary, the failure of U.S. and Chinese negotiators to bring China into the global trading system this week threatens to doom China's prospects for entering the World Trade Organization this year. Chinese negotiators don't want to jeopardize their fragile financial system or the economic health of such key sectors as textiles. Their U.S. counterparts are mindful that a deal could face an array of political opponents.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
America's complex engagement with China defies flat conclusions and bright lines. The two nations connect and collide on so many different fronts that the relationship is never moving solely in one direction. Almost always, it is getting better and worse, simultaneously. With so much at stake, the U.S. can't afford the luxury of allowing any single issue to dominate its relations with China.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About a month before President Bush is to make his first state visit to China, reports have surfaced that the U.S.-made presidential plane for Chinese President Jiang Zemin has been found to be bugged with at least 20 listening devices. The Financial Times and the Washington Post reported today that the newly outfitted Boeing 767 was planted with tiny bugging devices, including one bug embedded in the headboard of the presidential bed on board the aircraft, according to unidentified sources.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The spy plane incident that severely strained Sino-U.S. relations in April appears to have ended without Washington paying the money Beijing demanded, a U.S. official said. China had sought $1 million and rejected a U.S. offer of $34,576. "We sent them a check for what we thought was reasonable costs, and they didn't accept it. It's been three months," the official said. "It's done." The U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The aircraft carrier Constellation and six other American warships begin a five-day visit here today in the latest sign of improving U.S.-Chinese relations. On Sunday, U.S. military officials described the ships' arrival as routine, but it is in many ways more a return to routine. The Constellation's presence marks the first time such a large group of U.S.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent release of three jailed Chinese-born scholars with strong ties to the United States removed a barrier to improved Sino-American ties, but their ordeal has so traumatized the international academic community that research on China could be crippled for years, analysts believe. All three spent months in jail before being convicted of spying.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
China has formally charged U.S. academic Wu Jianmin with endangering national security, a Hong Kong-based rights group said. Wu, detained April 8, will probably go on trial before President Bush's planned visit to China in October, the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said. But State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Wu's status has not changed since he was formally arrested May 25.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Bush suspended all U.S. military sales to China on Monday to protest the Chinese army's violent suppression of the pro-democracy movement. "It is very important the Chinese leaders know it's not going to be business as usual," Bush declared in a press conference announcing his decision. Bush's action, which also included a suspension of visits between U.S. and Chinese military leaders, won immediate praise across the political spectrum in Congress, where it was generally viewed as a sufficient response for the current situation.
NEWS
February 19, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a couple of peasant farmers from China's far northeast visited a friend here last month, they weren't interested in seeing the sights. All they cared about, their young Chinese host said, was keeping score on the Gulf War: Who had used what weapons and how many planes had been shot down? "They treated the fighting like a soccer match," he lamented. "It was really shocking to me to see these people more excited about people dying than I had ever seen them before." Since the first U.S.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department voiced its strong displeasure Monday with Chinese state television's decision to edit out comments on Taiwan and human rights from an interview with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell it broadcast over the weekend. The U.S. Embassy in China had an agreement with Chinese Central Television that Saturday's interview would be aired in its entirety, department officials said.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reflection of the wide gap that still divides Washington and Beijing, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday that the Bush administration intends to follow up on the release of three scholars convicted of espionage by pressing China on the fate of other detainees with U.S. connections.
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