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United States Foreign Relations China

NEWS
January 19, 2002 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About a month before President Bush is to make his first state visit to China, reports have surfaced that the U.S.-made presidential plane for Chinese President Jiang Zemin has been found to be bugged with at least 20 listening devices. The Financial Times and the Washington Post reported today that the newly outfitted Boeing 767 was planted with tiny bugging devices, including one bug embedded in the headboard of the presidential bed on board the aircraft, according to unidentified sources.
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NEWS
December 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
Agreeing to strengthen anti-terrorism cooperation, China has promised to consider letting the United States station an FBI agent in Beijing, an American envoy said Thursday. Francis X. Taylor, the top State Department counterterrorism official, praised China's help in tackling Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda network. But Taylor's account of two days of talks with Chinese officials made clear that many issues still separate the two sides.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The spy plane incident that severely strained Sino-U.S. relations in April appears to have ended without Washington paying the money Beijing demanded, a U.S. official said. China had sought $1 million and rejected a U.S. offer of $34,576. "We sent them a check for what we thought was reasonable costs, and they didn't accept it. It's been three months," the official said. "It's done." The U.S.
NEWS
October 20, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Meeting in person for the first time, President Bush and Chinese President Jiang Zemin pledged Friday to build a "mature" relationship based on common interests that would supersede the array of sensitive issues bedeviling their two nations. After meeting for more than three hours here, Bush and Jiang in effect turned over a new leaf in Sino-U.S. relations. Most notably, neither leader mentioned the April spy plane incident that severely strained relations between the two nations.
NEWS
October 19, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush declared today that China stands "side by side with the American people" during the U.S. military strikes in Afghanistan against Osama bin Laden and his followers. At a news conference after conducting an initial meeting with Chinese President Jiang Zemin, Bush told reporters that he is satisfied with Beijing's cooperation on intelligence gathering and in pursuing the financial assets of terrorists.
NEWS
September 28, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Americans gear up for a war on terrorism, many Chinese are relieved that the U.S. has discovered a new enemy, a role they feel China has been unfairly saddled with since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Better yet, say optimists here, the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States could provide an opening for Washington and Beijing to improve ties by joining forces against a problem--organized terror--that menaces both governments. "The attack has fully proved that China is a friend of the U.S.
NEWS
September 26, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Postcards can't quite capture what Michael O'Shea did on his spring break this year. The American college teacher went to China, saw the Great Wall--and inspired a mass ideological movement. Not that he planned it.
NEWS
September 26, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush has postponed an October state visit to Beijing in order to spend more time here to prosecute the war on terrorism, the White House said Tuesday. Press Secretary Ari Fleischer said Bush will still attend the two-day Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Shanghai, but that he will skip planned stops in Beijing, Seoul and Tokyo along the way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Ma fled China at age 7, after the Communist takeover in 1949. But his heart has never stopped yearning. "My dream is to see China become a democracy," Ma said recently in his cluttered Monterey Park office, which doubles as the U.S. headquarters for the dissident Chinese Rights Party. Ma, who makes his living offering a variety of services to Chinese immigrants, registered the organization in Hong Kong less than two months before it was returned to China by Great Britain in 1997.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration intends to launch an intensive dialogue with China about strategic nuclear weapons, hoping to persuade the Beijing government that U.S. missile defense plans pose no threat to Chinese security, a high-ranking White House official said Saturday. "We are going to tell the Chinese that the missile defense shield is not aimed at them and they shouldn't feel threatened by it," National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice said in an interview.
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