Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations China
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations China

NEWS
August 5, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent release of three jailed Chinese-born scholars with strong ties to the United States removed a barrier to improved Sino-American ties, but their ordeal has so traumatized the international academic community that research on China could be crippled for years, analysts believe. All three spent months in jail before being convicted of spying.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
China has formally charged U.S. academic Wu Jianmin with endangering national security, a Hong Kong-based rights group said. Wu, detained April 8, will probably go on trial before President Bush's planned visit to China in October, the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said. But State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Wu's status has not changed since he was formally arrested May 25.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department voiced its strong displeasure Monday with Chinese state television's decision to edit out comments on Taiwan and human rights from an interview with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell it broadcast over the weekend. The U.S. Embassy in China had an agreement with Chinese Central Television that Saturday's interview would be aired in its entirety, department officials said.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reflection of the wide gap that still divides Washington and Beijing, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday that the Bush administration intends to follow up on the release of three scholars convicted of espionage by pressing China on the fate of other detainees with U.S. connections.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a signal of its desire for better relations with Washington, Beijing today released two U.S.-based Chinese scholars convicted just two days ago on charges of spying for Taiwan and sentenced to 10 years in prison, U.S. and Chinese officials announced here today. Sociologist Gao Zhan, who was detained Feb. 11, was expelled and put on a plane to the United States, a senior U.S. official said. She was reportedly put aboard a Northwest flight to Detroit.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Chinese court convicted a U.S.-based, Chinese-born academic on espionage charges today and sentenced her to a 10-year prison term, her family said. The Beijing No. 1 Intermediate People's Court found Gao Zhan guilty after a one-day trial in which Gao spoke in her own defense and maintained her innocence. Gao, 39, a researcher at American University in Washington, was detained along with her husband and son by state security agents as they prepared to return to the U.S.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trials have begun in China for an American citizen and a permanent U.S. resident on charges that they spied for Taiwan, the State Department said Thursday. The two are among a string of U.S. passport holders who have been detained by China during the past year, prompting calls by members of Congress for punitive action against Beijing. But the trials come at a time when the United States and China are talking publicly about an improvement in relations. Officials said Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American technicians have made progress in dismantling a crippled Navy surveillance plane and have removed its tail cone in preparation for flying the aircraft home from China's Hainan island, according to U.S. contractors. The aircraft has been stranded on Hainan since it made an emergency landing there April 1 after colliding with a Chinese fighter jet over the South China Sea. Photographs released by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A 179-year-old letter from President Monroe to China's emperor, seeking the return of a damaged vessel pillaged on southern Chinese shores, sold for a higher-than-expected $19,150, New York auction house Sotheby's said. The 1822 letter, thought to be the first direct communication between a U.S. president and the emperor of China, was bought by an absentee bidder.
NEWS
June 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Monday that he has given a limited go-ahead to resume military-to-military contacts with China now that this spring's spy plane incident is being resolved.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|