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United States Foreign Relations China

NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reflection of the wide gap that still divides Washington and Beijing, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday that the Bush administration intends to follow up on the release of three scholars convicted of espionage by pressing China on the fate of other detainees with U.S. connections.
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NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a signal of its desire for better relations with Washington, Beijing today released two U.S.-based Chinese scholars convicted just two days ago on charges of spying for Taiwan and sentenced to 10 years in prison, U.S. and Chinese officials announced here today. Sociologist Gao Zhan, who was detained Feb. 11, was expelled and put on a plane to the United States, a senior U.S. official said. She was reportedly put aboard a Northwest flight to Detroit.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Chinese court convicted a U.S.-based, Chinese-born academic on espionage charges today and sentenced her to a 10-year prison term, her family said. The Beijing No. 1 Intermediate People's Court found Gao Zhan guilty after a one-day trial in which Gao spoke in her own defense and maintained her innocence. Gao, 39, a researcher at American University in Washington, was detained along with her husband and son by state security agents as they prepared to return to the U.S.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American technicians have made progress in dismantling a crippled Navy surveillance plane and have removed its tail cone in preparation for flying the aircraft home from China's Hainan island, according to U.S. contractors. The aircraft has been stranded on Hainan since it made an emergency landing there April 1 after colliding with a Chinese fighter jet over the South China Sea. Photographs released by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A 179-year-old letter from President Monroe to China's emperor, seeking the return of a damaged vessel pillaged on southern Chinese shores, sold for a higher-than-expected $19,150, New York auction house Sotheby's said. The 1822 letter, thought to be the first direct communication between a U.S. president and the emperor of China, was bought by an absentee bidder.
NEWS
June 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said Monday that he has given a limited go-ahead to resume military-to-military contacts with China now that this spring's spy plane incident is being resolved.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step sure to further strain U.S. relations with China, the Bush administration said Monday that it will allow President Chen Shui-bian of Taiwan to stop over in the United States before and after a trip to Latin America and to meet with members of Congress while he is in the country. Chen plans to visit New York on May 21-23 on his way to Latin America and stop in Houston on June 2-3 en route to Taiwan. Although U.S.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former President Clinton on Thursday urged China's quick entry into the World Trade Organization and said the United States should work as a partner with the Asian nation so that "the world will be a better place." In a speech here to the Fortune Global Forum, a gathering of about 700 international business executives, Clinton said his efforts as president to build a strong Sino-American relationship were part of a larger drive to involve the United States in Asia's future.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A self-styled alliance of Chinese computer hackers has called a halt to attacks on U.S. Web sites, after claiming to have broken into more than 1,000 sites. The group, which calls itself the "Hongke Union," thanked hackers but said it would not be connected to any further attacks. Chinese hackers declared a weeklong war on U.S. sites, from April 30 to last Monday, after a U.S. Navy spy plane collided with a Chinese fighter jet, setting off a diplomatic standoff.
NEWS
May 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
U.S. military officials received detailed information Saturday from technicians who inspected a crippled U.S. Navy surveillance plane that collided with a Chinese fighter jet last month. A U.S. Pacific Command spokesman at Camp Smith on Oahu island said the briefing continued into the afternoon with no immediate end in sight. The U.S. technical inspectors from Lockheed Martin Corp. arrived at Honolulu International Airport early Saturday, said a second Pacific Command spokesman, Navy Cmdr.
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