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United States Foreign Relations China

NEWS
September 26, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush has postponed an October state visit to Beijing in order to spend more time here to prosecute the war on terrorism, the White House said Tuesday. Press Secretary Ari Fleischer said Bush will still attend the two-day Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Shanghai, but that he will skip planned stops in Beijing, Seoul and Tokyo along the way.
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NEWS
September 2, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration intends to launch an intensive dialogue with China about strategic nuclear weapons, hoping to persuade the Beijing government that U.S. missile defense plans pose no threat to Chinese security, a high-ranking White House official said Saturday. "We are going to tell the Chinese that the missile defense shield is not aimed at them and they shouldn't feel threatened by it," National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice said in an interview.
NEWS
September 1, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has decided to impose economic sanctions on a major Chinese arms producer it says sold missile parts and technology to Pakistan, U.S. officials said Friday. Such trade is a violation of a U.S.-China accord that calls for Beijing to halt all missile exports, which for two decades has been one of the most troublesome issues between the two countries. The decision came just seven weeks before President Bush is scheduled to make his first official visit to China.
NEWS
August 24, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talks between U.S. and China on Beijing's agreement not to spread missile or nuclear weapons technology to other nations ended inconclusively Thursday, with American officials saying more work is needed to clarify the Chinese commitment. A U.S. delegation led by acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Vann Van Diepen had sought to ensure that China would abide by a promise made in November not to help other countries develop ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads.
NEWS
August 20, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The aircraft carrier Constellation and six other American warships begin a five-day visit here today in the latest sign of improving U.S.-Chinese relations. On Sunday, U.S. military officials described the ships' arrival as routine, but it is in many ways more a return to routine. The Constellation's presence marks the first time such a large group of U.S.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | From Reuters
China has rejected an offer by the United States to pay $34,576 in support costs for a crippled Navy spy plane as unacceptable after Beijing demanded $1 million, the official New China News Agency reported Saturday. "The so-called decision is unacceptable to China both in its content and form," Zhang Qiyue, a spokeswoman for China's Foreign Ministry, was quoted by the news agency as saying. U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four senior American senators warned Chinese President Jiang Zemin on Wednesday that Beijing's continued sale of sensitive missile technology to other countries would trigger an arms race detrimental to both the U.S. and China. The lawmakers also told Jiang that such sales would boost support in the United States for developing a missile defense system--a step vehemently opposed by China. "He made the point he didn't want to see an arms race," Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-Del.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent release of three jailed Chinese-born scholars with strong ties to the United States removed a barrier to improved Sino-American ties, but their ordeal has so traumatized the international academic community that research on China could be crippled for years, analysts believe. All three spent months in jail before being convicted of spying.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
China has formally charged U.S. academic Wu Jianmin with endangering national security, a Hong Kong-based rights group said. Wu, detained April 8, will probably go on trial before President Bush's planned visit to China in October, the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy said. But State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Wu's status has not changed since he was formally arrested May 25.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | ANUJ GUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department voiced its strong displeasure Monday with Chinese state television's decision to edit out comments on Taiwan and human rights from an interview with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell it broadcast over the weekend. The U.S. Embassy in China had an agreement with Chinese Central Television that Saturday's interview would be aired in its entirety, department officials said.
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