Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Colombia
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Colombia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A gunman killed the leading candidate in next year's presidential election Friday, prompting an angry President Virgilio Barco Vargas to revive an extradition treaty with the United States to combat a string of cocaine traffic-linked killings of public officials. The assassination came only hours after drug traffickers killed a provincial police chief in the city of Medellin. The gunman opened fire on Sen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are plenty of ways to interpret "Traffic," the labyrinthine drug war docudrama with five Oscar nominations. But in Colombia, where the film was just released, one stands out: vindication. Few countries have done as much to fight drugs, with less recognition for the effort, than Colombia. Three presidential candidates, dozens of judges and hundreds of police officers have been killed in the largely U.S.-backed war on drugs.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their single biggest victory in the drug war, Colombian police Friday shot and killed notorious narcotics trafficker Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, who as a leader of the Medellin cartel waged a campaign of terror to maintain the world's biggest cocaine empire.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush declared Wednesday that Mexico, Colombia and 18 other drug-producing countries are cooperating fully with the United States in the war on narcotics, despite increases in the worldwide cultivation of marijuana and the crops that are made into heroin and cocaine. It was Bush's first venture into the diplomatically sensitive subject of drug certification.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | United Press International
A convicted Colombian cocaine trafficker released by mistake before his 1984 federal trial was extradited to the United States on Sunday for sentencing, U.S. marshals said. Victor Eduardo Mera-Mosquera, 36, was handed over to marshals by the Colombian government on Saturday and flown from Bogota to New York.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh on Sunday praised Colombia's new willingness to extradite drug criminals to the United States and said that the Bush Administration has not ruled out sending U.S. troops to that country to assist in its war on narcotics traffickers, if such help is requested. "I think we have to look at any request that we get for either law enforcement or military assistance seriously," he said, adding that recent acts of terrorism in Colombia, including Friday's assassination of Sen.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Saturday angrily condemned the assassination of the leading Colombian presidential candidate and said "the narco-traffickers who again have robbed Colombia of a courageous leader must be defeated." The President, saluting the decision by Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas to reinstate a suspended extradition treaty with the United States, pledged that "the U.S. is ready to coordinate the extradition of these criminals as expeditiously as possible."
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a bustling Saturday afternoon in this river town cut from the jungle, music blares from the open-air bars where men in straw cowboy hats flirt with waitresses. Pickup trucks honk at cruising motor scooters that block the dirt streets. Lately, a new sound has been added to the mix: the thump of helicopters overhead. Townsfolk believe the flights signal that the 2,000-soldier Cazadores (Hunters) Battalion, based four miles away, has begun to evacuate.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the three Andean nations have agreed on the outlines of an anti-drug plan to be unveiled at next week's summit in Colombia, but the plan may not provide the immediate economic assistance that the South American countries had hoped for, Bush Administration officials said Wednesday. A communique to be signed by President Bush and the Andean leaders would express their common determination to replace cocaine commerce in the region with a legitimate economy.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Colombian Congress voted late Thursday to remove a 6-year-old ban on extraditing its citizens for trial in foreign countries, reversing a stance that has been a major point of conflict with the United States. U.S. criminal charges are pending against several alleged Colombian drug traffickers, including some already jailed here. Among the jailed are the notorious Rodriguez Orejuela brothers, the convicted heads of the Cali drug cartel.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday rejected a plea from Colombian President Andres Pastrana for the United States to join the peace talks that his government is holding with Marxist guerrillas. But in their 45-minute meeting, Bush also vowed to work with Congress to expand trade with Colombia as a way to stimulate lawful commerce in that beleaguered nation. A spokesman for Pastrana said afterward that the Colombian president was thrilled by Bush's offer to increase trade.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombian President Andres Pastrana urged the Bush administration Monday to send an envoy to peace talks with the South American country's largest and most dangerous rebel organization despite a long-standing U.S. policy of refusing to deal with the insurgents. "It is important that the United States be there to directly exchange points of view," Pastrana told a small group of reporters at breakfast before meetings on Capitol Hill and at the White House.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Colombian President Andres Pastrana arrived Saturday for a four-day visit to the United States, during which he will seek trade agreements to revive his country's ailing economy and might ask for more money to buttress his U.S.-backed drug war. Pastrana's trip will include a visit with President Bush and talks with U.S. congressional leaders, governors and trade representatives, according to the presidential palace.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
White House anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey on Monday predicted heavy fighting in an approaching U.S.-backed anti-drug offensive and warned that there would be repercussions for Colombia's neighbors. But with "vital" U.S. interests at stake, and insurgents growing stronger through deepening ties to the drug trade, McCaffrey said he saw no alternative to the $1.3-billion effort set to get underway in January. "Colombia has no option.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four heavy-caliber machine guns mounted on U.S.-made helicopters used for fighting drugs in Colombia have been malfunctioning for months, throwing the aircraft off-balance and threatening the safety of the Colombian pilots, Clinton administration officials said Thursday.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton swooped into this troubled country Wednesday to showcase American determination to face down leftist rebels and drug traffickers. But he pledged that aiding Colombia will not embroil the U.S. in a military escalation echoing the Vietnam War. "I reject the idea that we must choose between supporting peace and fighting drugs. We can do both; indeed, to succeed, we must do both," Clinton said at a ceremony to tout $1.3 billion in U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | From Associated Press
The No. 2 man in the Medellin cocaine cartel surrendered Tuesday in exchange for the government's promise not to extradite him to the United States, where he is wanted on drug charges. Jorge Luis Ochoa, 41, turned himself in at Caldas, 10 miles south of Medellin, and was jailed in the Medellin suburb of Itagui, court officials said. He could face up to 30 years in prison, but authorities have promised to be lenient with dealers who turn themselves in.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soldiers and police raided the estates of cocaine barons Monday, seizing aircraft, cars and cattle and bringing the number of people arrested in three days to more than 11,000, authorities reported. One of those arrested Monday was identified as a finance chief of the Medellin drug cartel. The cartel bosses have so far eluded the emergency-rule crackdown, but new raids were being reported hourly across the nation.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
U.S. officials said Saturday that they have broken up a major drug trafficking operation that used commercial ships to haul Colombian cocaine around the world. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Customs Service said 43 people have been arrested and almost 25 tons of cocaine confiscated during the two-year investigation, dubbed "Operation Journey." Officials believe that the organization transported at least 68 tons of cocaine to 12 nations in three years.
NEWS
August 26, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it FARCland. Colombians do. During 18 months of negotiations between the government and the FARC, as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia is known, a "peace city" has sprung up here in southern Colombia's deforested jungle. The government has built an amphitheater for weekly public hearings. Blue-and-white tents and a Red Cross station surround it, lending a summer camp atmosphere.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|