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United States Foreign Relations Colombia

NEWS
August 24, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday defended his decision to release $1.3 billion in anti-drug aid to Colombia, as administration officials sought to shift attention away from military assistance and toward efforts to build civil institutions and wean peasants from drug production.
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NEWS
August 6, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Special Forces trainers quietly arrived in Colombia last week and have begun preparing this country's second anti-narcotics military battalion, a key element of a new $1.3-billion American anti-drug aid package, U.S. and Colombian sources confirmed. Colombian soldiers with rifles drawn surrounded both the trainers and the U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane that brought them into this southern town about two hours by highway from guerrilla-held territory.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A suspected cocaine smuggler was extradited to the United States on Thursday, the second time that President Andres Pastrana has sent one of his countrymen to stand trial abroad. Orlando Garcia, an alleged member of a gang that shipped cocaine to the United States, departed Bogota's international airport on a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration plane bound for New York. He was escorted onto the tarmac by about 200 police officers.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress moved forward Thursday with a $1.3-billion package of U.S. anti-narcotics aid for this nation, diplomats from Europe and elsewhere met here in the jungle with Colombian officials and Marxist guerrillas to talk about alternatives to drug production. While the U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Colombia, a country of fallen heroes, Victor Tafur's case normally might not have caused more than a flutter. Sure, he is the son of an assassinated anti-drug crusader, and he is still recovering from injuries he sustained in a near-fatal plane crash while working on an anti-narcotics project.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombia and Mexico again won President Clinton's certification Wednesday as fully cooperating partners in the war on drugs, despite government figures showing that the flow of illicit narcotics from the two countries has reached new heights. The stamp of approval on the nations' anti-drug efforts came as no surprise. The Clinton administration has long argued that Mexican officials are doing their best to combat powerful traffickers within their borders. U.S.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Colombia on Friday to press the administration's $1.6-billion plan to combat illegal drugs in this South American nation. The visit, which includes meetings with President Andres Pastrana and other officials, comes amid signs that anti-drug efforts by some of Colombia's neighbors have led to an increase in coca cultivation here.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | RUTH MORRIS and JUANITA DARLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hours after a powerful car bomb exploded here Thursday, killing seven people and awakening fears that drug cartels may be renewing a dormant terrorist campaign to fight extradition, an undeterred President Andres Pastrana ordered a suspected narcotics trafficker sent to the United States to face criminal charges. His signature was the last step in an 11-month process that will make Jaime Orlando Lara Nausa the first Colombian in nine years to be extradited to the United States for prosecution.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. and Colombian authorities hauled into custody Wednesday "a who's who of drug traffickers operating in Colombia," busting up a powerful consortium blamed for flooding the streets of the United States with up to $60 billion worth of cocaine a year.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | RUTH MORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Clearly bidding for a major increase in U.S. anti-narcotics aid, Colombia's top military commander said Saturday that his forces are making significant strides toward improving their human rights record while Marxist rebels and their right-wing outlaw foes share equal responsibility for the deaths of many more unarmed civilians. Armed forces commander Gen.
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