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United States Foreign Relations Colombia

NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Colombian President Andres Pastrana arrived Saturday for a four-day visit to the United States, during which he will seek trade agreements to revive his country's ailing economy and might ask for more money to buttress his U.S.-backed drug war. Pastrana's trip will include a visit with President Bush and talks with U.S. congressional leaders, governors and trade representatives, according to the presidential palace.
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NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
White House anti-drug czar Barry McCaffrey on Monday predicted heavy fighting in an approaching U.S.-backed anti-drug offensive and warned that there would be repercussions for Colombia's neighbors. But with "vital" U.S. interests at stake, and insurgents growing stronger through deepening ties to the drug trade, McCaffrey said he saw no alternative to the $1.3-billion effort set to get underway in January. "Colombia has no option.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | JIM MANN
What's behind Washington's huge, expensive military intervention to combat drugs in Colombia? Last week, the actions of the House Republican leadership suggested one possible answer: procurement. The Republican Congress, it appears, wants to help American defense firms sell helicopters for use in Colombia--and to obtain the prices they want for these copters. This is not all that unusual.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four heavy-caliber machine guns mounted on U.S.-made helicopters used for fighting drugs in Colombia have been malfunctioning for months, throwing the aircraft off-balance and threatening the safety of the Colombian pilots, Clinton administration officials said Thursday.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton swooped into this troubled country Wednesday to showcase American determination to face down leftist rebels and drug traffickers. But he pledged that aiding Colombia will not embroil the U.S. in a military escalation echoing the Vietnam War. "I reject the idea that we must choose between supporting peace and fighting drugs. We can do both; indeed, to succeed, we must do both," Clinton said at a ceremony to tout $1.3 billion in U.S.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
U.S. officials said Saturday that they have broken up a major drug trafficking operation that used commercial ships to haul Colombian cocaine around the world. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Customs Service said 43 people have been arrested and almost 25 tons of cocaine confiscated during the two-year investigation, dubbed "Operation Journey." Officials believe that the organization transported at least 68 tons of cocaine to 12 nations in three years.
NEWS
August 26, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it FARCland. Colombians do. During 18 months of negotiations between the government and the FARC, as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia is known, a "peace city" has sprung up here in southern Colombia's deforested jungle. The government has built an amphitheater for weekly public hearings. Blue-and-white tents and a Red Cross station surround it, lending a summer camp atmosphere.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday defended his decision to release $1.3 billion in anti-drug aid to Colombia, as administration officials sought to shift attention away from military assistance and toward efforts to build civil institutions and wean peasants from drug production.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Special Forces trainers quietly arrived in Colombia last week and have begun preparing this country's second anti-narcotics military battalion, a key element of a new $1.3-billion American anti-drug aid package, U.S. and Colombian sources confirmed. Colombian soldiers with rifles drawn surrounded both the trainers and the U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane that brought them into this southern town about two hours by highway from guerrilla-held territory.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A suspected cocaine smuggler was extradited to the United States on Thursday, the second time that President Andres Pastrana has sent one of his countrymen to stand trial abroad. Orlando Garcia, an alleged member of a gang that shipped cocaine to the United States, departed Bogota's international airport on a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration plane bound for New York. He was escorted onto the tarmac by about 200 police officers.
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