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United States Foreign Relations Colombia

NEWS
August 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
U.S. officials said Saturday that they have broken up a major drug trafficking operation that used commercial ships to haul Colombian cocaine around the world. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. Customs Service said 43 people have been arrested and almost 25 tons of cocaine confiscated during the two-year investigation, dubbed "Operation Journey." Officials believe that the organization transported at least 68 tons of cocaine to 12 nations in three years.
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NEWS
August 26, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it FARCland. Colombians do. During 18 months of negotiations between the government and the FARC, as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia is known, a "peace city" has sprung up here in southern Colombia's deforested jungle. The government has built an amphitheater for weekly public hearings. Blue-and-white tents and a Red Cross station surround it, lending a summer camp atmosphere.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday defended his decision to release $1.3 billion in anti-drug aid to Colombia, as administration officials sought to shift attention away from military assistance and toward efforts to build civil institutions and wean peasants from drug production.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Special Forces trainers quietly arrived in Colombia last week and have begun preparing this country's second anti-narcotics military battalion, a key element of a new $1.3-billion American anti-drug aid package, U.S. and Colombian sources confirmed. Colombian soldiers with rifles drawn surrounded both the trainers and the U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane that brought them into this southern town about two hours by highway from guerrilla-held territory.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
A suspected cocaine smuggler was extradited to the United States on Thursday, the second time that President Andres Pastrana has sent one of his countrymen to stand trial abroad. Orlando Garcia, an alleged member of a gang that shipped cocaine to the United States, departed Bogota's international airport on a U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration plane bound for New York. He was escorted onto the tarmac by about 200 police officers.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Congress moved forward Thursday with a $1.3-billion package of U.S. anti-narcotics aid for this nation, diplomats from Europe and elsewhere met here in the jungle with Colombian officials and Marxist guerrillas to talk about alternatives to drug production. While the U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Colombia, a country of fallen heroes, Victor Tafur's case normally might not have caused more than a flutter. Sure, he is the son of an assassinated anti-drug crusader, and he is still recovering from injuries he sustained in a near-fatal plane crash while working on an anti-narcotics project.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombia and Mexico again won President Clinton's certification Wednesday as fully cooperating partners in the war on drugs, despite government figures showing that the flow of illicit narcotics from the two countries has reached new heights. The stamp of approval on the nations' anti-drug efforts came as no surprise. The Clinton administration has long argued that Mexican officials are doing their best to combat powerful traffickers within their borders. U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Government officials told Congress on Tuesday that coca production in Colombia is up sharply, and the Clinton administration's efforts to deal with the problem drew fire from both Republicans and Democrats at a congressional hearing. Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, the head of the White House drug control office, said cocaine production in Colombia reached 520 metric tons last year compared with 435 in 1998 and 230 in 1995.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright arrived in Colombia on Friday to press the administration's $1.6-billion plan to combat illegal drugs in this South American nation. The visit, which includes meetings with President Andres Pastrana and other officials, comes amid signs that anti-drug efforts by some of Colombia's neighbors have led to an increase in coca cultivation here.
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