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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yelstin, putting the Cold War formally to rest, proclaimed on Saturday a "new era" in which the two nations will join as allies to seek "an enduring peace that rests on lasting common values." In a joint declaration issued after a three-hour meeting at this rustic presidential retreat, they vowed that their countries will no longer regard each other as adversaries. Instead, they pledged to act as partners in promoting democracy and reform.
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NEWS
August 14, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman hotly denied Friday that the United States would be playing any kind of special role in keeping the peace in the former Soviet Union. Staking a firm claim to the collapsed Soviet empire as part of Russia's sphere of influence, spokesman Mikhail Demurin said reports of U.S. plans to step up its attempts to mediate conflicts here carry "considerable distortions." He had been assured by U.S. officials, he said, that "the U.S.A.
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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | From The Times Washington staff
ENVOY ENVY: Career diplomats in Washington are among those reaping rewards from the breakup of the Soviet Union. . . . Now that Washington has recognized 17 new nations, there's an unexpected opportunity for careerists aspiring to the highly political, usually scarce ambassadorial posts. The good news: Most are in remote and shabby capitals and thus do not appeal to friends of the President and his important political campaign contributors.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the conclusion of the second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, known as START II, American arms experts are looking beyond the accord to a new, more challenging and potentially more dangerous era in arms control. President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin may be signing a treaty that will cut U.S. and former Soviet nuclear arsenals to their lowest level since the early 1960s.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that the Western democracies have yet to win the Cold War, former President Richard M. Nixon said Wednesday that the United States must lead the world in providing massive aid, perhaps $20 billion a year, to the former Soviet republics or risk confrontation with a new generation of despots.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | Associated Press
Two programs to attract former Soviet scientists, placing at least 150 in universities and another 150 with research firms, were announced Monday by the State Department. The scientists will be placed in entry-level jobs for one to two years as visiting scholars. They will begin arriving in time for the fall semester, said Margaret Tutwiler, the department spokeswoman. The schools will underwrite most of the $1 million program. The U.S.
NEWS
January 17, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While insisting they are concerned about nuclear proliferation, the leaders in charge of the old Soviet nuclear arsenal are "clearly resentful" of U.S. efforts to increase security and have rebuffed American overtures of help to prevent the weapons' spread to the Third World, U.S. officials said Thursday. The cold response from military leaders in the former Soviet republics and the lack of attention to the issue by Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that uranium already may have been smuggled from Belarus, two influential senators Wednesday urged President Bush and President-elect Bill Clinton to coordinate U.S. policy toward the former Soviet Union and give nuclear non-proliferation top priority during the transition. "We do not have the luxury . . . of declaring a recess while we change administrations," said Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.). Nunn and Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
The United States and the former Soviet Union would engage in the largest educational exchange program in history under a proposal emerging in Congress. As the United States and former Soviet republics work out more details of new economic and security relationships, U.S. plans so far have "ignored the importance of the people," said Sen. Bill Bradley (D-N.J.).
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the conclusion of the second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, known as START II, American arms experts are looking beyond the accord to a new, more challenging and potentially more dangerous era in arms control. President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin may be signing a treaty that will cut U.S. and former Soviet nuclear arsenals to their lowest level since the early 1960s.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that uranium already may have been smuggled from Belarus, two influential senators Wednesday urged President Bush and President-elect Bill Clinton to coordinate U.S. policy toward the former Soviet Union and give nuclear non-proliferation top priority during the transition. "We do not have the luxury . . . of declaring a recess while we change administrations," said Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.). Nunn and Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger said Friday that the United States will provide $412 million worth of food and medicine to the former Soviet Union this winter, almost doubling the $417 million in aid approved by the U.S. Congress earlier this month.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clearing the way for ratification of the most comprehensive arms control agreement of the Cold War era, Secretary of State James A. Baker III and senior officials of the four nuclear-armed states of the former Soviet Union signed an agreement Saturday that makes Russia the lone successor to Moscow's atomic arsenal.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
The United States and the former Soviet Union would engage in the largest educational exchange program in history under a proposal emerging in Congress. As the United States and former Soviet republics work out more details of new economic and security relationships, U.S. plans so far have "ignored the importance of the people," said Sen. Bill Bradley (D-N.J.).
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | From The Times Washington staff
ENVOY ENVY: Career diplomats in Washington are among those reaping rewards from the breakup of the Soviet Union. . . . Now that Washington has recognized 17 new nations, there's an unexpected opportunity for careerists aspiring to the highly political, usually scarce ambassadorial posts. The good news: Most are in remote and shabby capitals and thus do not appeal to friends of the President and his important political campaign contributors.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | From Reuters
The Commonwealth of Independent States' four nuclear powers emerged empty-handed Saturday from eight hours of talks on rescuing the landmark START accord with the United States cutting strategic nuclear arsenals. Rivalry between Russia and Ukraine torpedoed the Moscow negotiations, foreign ministers from the two countries said after the talks. They and their Kazakh and Belarussian counterparts were unable even to agree on a joint statement.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | From Reuters
The Commonwealth of Independent States' four nuclear powers emerged empty-handed Saturday from eight hours of talks on rescuing the landmark START accord with the United States cutting strategic nuclear arsenals. Rivalry between Russia and Ukraine torpedoed the Moscow negotiations, foreign ministers from the two countries said after the talks. They and their Kazakh and Belarussian counterparts were unable even to agree on a joint statement.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his arrival in Uzbekistan on Saturday, Secretary of State James A. Baker III has visited every republic of the former Soviet Union except for strife-torn Georgia, an endurance record so far unmatched by any other foreign minister. Washington's objective is clear. As a senior Administration official told reporters traveling with Baker: "It is important that we have a presence so that we can exert some influence." But influence on whom and to what end?
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | Associated Press
Two programs to attract former Soviet scientists, placing at least 150 in universities and another 150 with research firms, were announced Monday by the State Department. The scientists will be placed in entry-level jobs for one to two years as visiting scholars. They will begin arriving in time for the fall semester, said Margaret Tutwiler, the department spokeswoman. The schools will underwrite most of the $1 million program. The U.S.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | MICHAEL DOBBS and ROBERT G. KAISER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Almost three months after he was forced out of office, former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Monday that some of his most pessimistic predictions about the disintegration of the world's largest country are already being realized. In a wide-ranging interview, the last leader of the Soviet Union criticized the Bush Administration for suggesting that the United States had won the Cold War and could now preside over a one-superpower world.
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