Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Costa Rica
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Costa Rica

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez complained Thursday that continued U.S. aid to Nicaragua's contras is an obstacle to his peace plan for Central America, but he said he does not believe that the Reagan Administration is actively trying to sabotage his proposal. Nicaragua "can't become a pluralistic country if there is war," Arias told a press conference after two days of talks with President Reagan and other U.S. officials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Costa Rica, Colombia Avoid U.S. Sanctions: U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor announced that after a year of talks, Costa Rica and Colombia have signed agreements pledging to cooperate in trying to get the 15-nation European Union to scrap trade barriers involving bananas. Those barriers have been attacked by U.S. banana-exporting companies, most notably Chiquita Brands International, which contend the European restrictions are costing hundreds of millions of dollars in lost sales for U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
President Oscar Arias Sanchez says he is willing to change some parts of his Central American peace plan that are opposed by the Reagan Administration. The 10-point Arias proposal calls for cease-fires in Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala and a cutoff of all outside aid to insurgent forces in those countries as soon as their governments start talks with unarmed opponents.
NEWS
February 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation, with its tradition of civilian rule, fair elections and peaceful stability, has long been portrayed as the oasis of Central America--the apple in any U.S. government's eye. But a series of disputes with Washington in the last year, culminating in U.S. protests over Costa Rican labor laws, have strained bilateral relations and left Costa Rican officials baffled and angry.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Costa Rica, Colombia Avoid U.S. Sanctions: U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor announced that after a year of talks, Costa Rica and Colombia have signed agreements pledging to cooperate in trying to get the 15-nation European Union to scrap trade barriers involving bananas. Those barriers have been attacked by U.S. banana-exporting companies, most notably Chiquita Brands International, which contend the European restrictions are costing hundreds of millions of dollars in lost sales for U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, shifting his focus from the deteriorating Middle East peace process, flies today to Guatemala, where he hopes to rally the fractious leaders of Central America to denounce the Nicaraguan government. "I hate to spend all my time discussing communiques, because there's a lot of work to do, things that people should be taking action on," Shultz said after learning that Guatemala and Costa Rica are withdrawing their support for a U.S.
NEWS
August 13, 1987
Nicaragua told the World Court in The Hague that it is dropping its case against Costa Rica, in which the Sandinista government accused its Central American neighbor of tolerating U.S.-backed contra operations on its territory. Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega had said his government would drop the case in the wake of last week's five-nation peace plan for Central America.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's trip to Costa Rica today is expected to be buoyed by a surprise development--the announcement of a major debt-reduction package for that nation under a Third World debt-relief plan outlined by U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady. Although details were still being ironed out Thursday, negotiators for Costa Rica and about 250 commercial banks were reported to have agreed in principle on a plan that would significantly pare back the estimated $1.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | Associated Press
The CIA has suspended its station chief in Costa Rica after learning that he failed to fully disclose his participation in a secret network flying military supplies to Nicaraguan rebels, U.S. intelligence sources said Saturday. The suspension of the station chief, who used the pseudonym Tomas Castillo, follows his recall earlier this month and two internal CIA investigations that cleared him of illegal actions.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez charged the Soviet Union on Thursday with aiding leftist rebels in defiance of a Central American peace accord and urged President Reagan to press the issue with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Moscow summit meeting late next month. Speaking to the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Arias said he is "very disappointed" with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush, who was in Hawaii on Saturday, nominated foreign service veteran John A. Bushnell as ambassador to Costa Rica, succeeding Deane Hinton. Bushnell has been deputy chief of mission to Panama since 1989.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It happened one night in February over white wine and fish in Miami, when two young and decidedly fashionable couples were dining and reminiscing. Their conversation was relaxed and comfortable, full of discussions about family and an election going on that night in Nicaragua. The talk at one point turned to an upcoming big event in one of the couples' lives. Who, asked the President-elect of Costa Rica, would represent the United States at his inauguration?
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rafael Angel Calderon, whose father's Costa Rican political career ended in exile, was sworn in Tuesday as president of Central America's most enduring democracy. Invoking his father's one-time populist ideals and briefly acknowledging the foreign activism and peacemaking role of his predecessor, Oscar Arias Sanchez, Calderon promised to tackle Costa Rica's deficit. He also pledged to help lead, by example, a region that until only recently has been torn by civil war and violence.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's trip to Costa Rica today is expected to be buoyed by a surprise development--the announcement of a major debt-reduction package for that nation under a Third World debt-relief plan outlined by U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady. Although details were still being ironed out Thursday, negotiators for Costa Rica and about 250 commercial banks were reported to have agreed in principle on a plan that would significantly pare back the estimated $1.
NEWS
August 1, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, shifting his focus from the deteriorating Middle East peace process, flies today to Guatemala, where he hopes to rally the fractious leaders of Central America to denounce the Nicaraguan government. "I hate to spend all my time discussing communiques, because there's a lot of work to do, things that people should be taking action on," Shultz said after learning that Guatemala and Costa Rica are withdrawing their support for a U.S.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez charged the Soviet Union on Thursday with aiding leftist rebels in defiance of a Central American peace accord and urged President Reagan to press the issue with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Moscow summit meeting late next month. Speaking to the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Arias said he is "very disappointed" with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush, who was in Hawaii on Saturday, nominated foreign service veteran John A. Bushnell as ambassador to Costa Rica, succeeding Deane Hinton. Bushnell has been deputy chief of mission to Panama since 1989.
NEWS
February 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This nation, with its tradition of civilian rule, fair elections and peaceful stability, has long been portrayed as the oasis of Central America--the apple in any U.S. government's eye. But a series of disputes with Washington in the last year, culminating in U.S. protests over Costa Rican labor laws, have strained bilateral relations and left Costa Rican officials baffled and angry.
NEWS
August 13, 1987
Nicaragua told the World Court in The Hague that it is dropping its case against Costa Rica, in which the Sandinista government accused its Central American neighbor of tolerating U.S.-backed contra operations on its territory. Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega had said his government would drop the case in the wake of last week's five-nation peace plan for Central America.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez complained Thursday that continued U.S. aid to Nicaragua's contras is an obstacle to his peace plan for Central America, but he said he does not believe that the Reagan Administration is actively trying to sabotage his proposal. Nicaragua "can't become a pluralistic country if there is war," Arias told a press conference after two days of talks with President Reagan and other U.S. officials.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|