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United States Foreign Relations Croatia

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NEWS
December 24, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bad blood between American diplomats and spies in the Balkans grew into a secret but nasty turf war this year in which the State Department's diplomats tried--without success--to gain access to top-secret communications between the CIA and its field officers, according to senior Clinton administration officials. Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott and other senior State Department officials sought to force the CIA to agree to new rules that would give a U.S.
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NEWS
May 12, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior U.S. official's praise for one of Croatia's most strident nationalists has triggered a bitter diplomatic row and invited unusually harsh words from the Muslim president of Bosnia. The anger of President Alija Izetbegovic comes at a time when his cooperation is needed in delicate negotiations over refugee returns, restructuring the national media and other unresolved elements of the Bosnian peace process.
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NEWS
January 16, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two dozen European nations finally and formally recognized Croatia and Slovenia on Wednesday, a move that prompted jubilant celebrations in the breakaway republics and effectively dissolved the 73-year-old Yugoslav federation. The rejoicing was especially fervent here among the Croats.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Croatian government took control of its entire territory Thursday for the first time since declaring independence 6 1/2 years ago and was admonished by U.S. officials to protect the rights of its minority Serbs. In a ceremony in a suburb of the devastated city of Vukovar, where the 1991 Serb-Croat war began, the last piece of Croatia seized by rebel Serbs, the Eastern Slavonia region hugging the Danube River, was formally restored to Zagreb's rule, and a two-year U.N.
NEWS
May 12, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior U.S. official's praise for one of Croatia's most strident nationalists has triggered a bitter diplomatic row and invited unusually harsh words from the Muslim president of Bosnia. The anger of President Alija Izetbegovic comes at a time when his cooperation is needed in delicate negotiations over refugee returns, restructuring the national media and other unresolved elements of the Bosnian peace process.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration said Thursday that it is making progress in trying to persuade Croatian President Franjo Tudjman to rescind his order requiring United Nations forces to leave his country after March 31, but it declined to provide details. In testimony before Congress, Assistant Secretary of State Richard C. Holbrooke said he has just completed the first round of "a very intense dialogue" with the Croatians and plans to return to Zagreb this weekend.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its renewed charge that Serbs are the primary aggressors throughout the shattered Yugoslav federation, the Clinton Administration on Tuesday called on Croatia to end its two-day offensive and re-establish cease-fire lines that cede one-third of the country to Serbian control. "We do not believe the situation should be changed by the use of force," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | Reuters
The U.S. envoy to the United Nations said Wednesday that Croatia could face economic sanctions if it fails to heed warnings about staying out of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Asked at a news conference about the U.S. view of Croatian support for ethnic kin in the Bosnian conflict, Madeleine Albright said, "I can tell you this is a subject that comes up frequently and that might in fact lead to sanctions if there is not some change on this issue."
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madeleine Albright, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, on Friday condemned the "murderous bombardment" of Sarajevo by Bosnian Serbs and put all combatants on notice that blocking aid will be considered a war crime. As she wrapped up the highest-level American visit to the former Yugoslavia since war broke out in 1991, Albright repeated warnings that stiff U.N.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. Ambassador Madeleine Albright vowed Thursday after inspecting a mass grave in Serbian-occupied Croatia that the United States will never allow amnesty for those who have committed atrocities in the former Yugoslav federation, even as the price for a Balkan peace settlement. The U.S. government also pledged $25 million in new support for a war crimes tribunal intended to try those suspected of crimes against humanity in this region still torn by nationalist war.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bad blood between American diplomats and spies in the Balkans grew into a secret but nasty turf war this year in which the State Department's diplomats tried--without success--to gain access to top-secret communications between the CIA and its field officers, according to senior Clinton administration officials. Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott and other senior State Department officials sought to force the CIA to agree to new rules that would give a U.S.
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Peter Galbraith, the U.S. ambassador to Croatia, sat down in a Zagreb mosque in the spring of 1994 with Imam Sevko Omerbasic, the religious leader of Zagreb's small Muslim community, they talked of their shared passion: the plight of the besieged Muslims in neighboring Bosnia. Galbraith, who was accompanied by an embassy aide, later described the meeting as a courtesy call "over tea cakes and Fantas." But Omerbasic claimed that the meeting was much more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1995 | DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The delegation visiting from the Balkans took pictures and stood in the shadow of the concrete freeway overpasses repaired after the Northridge earthquake. They huddled intently around George Caravalho, Santa Clarita's city manager, as he explained how the structure over Gavin Canyon was finished in four months. "Is it true?" asked an incredulous Stjepan Dujmovic, a municipal official from Croatia.
NEWS
October 28, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This quiet, staid Midwestern city may seem an unlikely site for the complex diplomatic talks that finally could end the conflict in Bosnia-Herzegovina, but in Dayton the Clinton Administration is getting everything it wanted: tight security and no distractions. With only a few days to go before the talks open Wednesday, security has tightened visibly at nearby Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, where the parley will take place.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
U.S. diplo mats, hoping that shifting battlefield fortunes will improve chances for peace, shuttled between Serbia and Croatia on Friday to push an initiative that Croatia's president said could produce a deal within weeks. But the main warring sides in Bosnia-Herzegovina--the Muslim-led government and rebel Serbs--adopted a more stubborn attitude a day before the U.S. delegation was expected in Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital. Croatian troops, meanwhile, pressed an assault on rebel Serbs.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite its renewed charge that Serbs are the primary aggressors throughout the shattered Yugoslav federation, the Clinton Administration on Tuesday called on Croatia to end its two-day offensive and re-establish cease-fire lines that cede one-third of the country to Serbian control. "We do not believe the situation should be changed by the use of force," State Department spokesman Nicholas Burns said.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatian President Franjo Tudjman is expected to meet Thursday with President Clinton and later in the week with U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali to work out details of a continued U.N. troop deployment in Croatia. The high-profile U.S. visit is seen as a pay-back to Tudjman for reversing his decision to expel 12,000 U.N. peacekeepers in his country, thereby averting a new round of fighting between Croats and rebel Serbs.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The praise heaped on the United States by officials from Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina as they signed a preliminary peace agreement Tuesday night was enough to bring a smile even to the usually dour face of Secretary of State Warren Christopher. After a year in which the news from Bosnia has come in only two varieties--bad and worse--Christopher, President Clinton and their deputies suddenly can cite a string of successes.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatian President Franjo Tudjman is expected to meet Thursday with President Clinton and later in the week with U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali to work out details of a continued U.N. troop deployment in Croatia. The high-profile U.S. visit is seen as a pay-back to Tudjman for reversing his decision to expel 12,000 U.N. peacekeepers in his country, thereby averting a new round of fighting between Croats and rebel Serbs.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration said Thursday that it is making progress in trying to persuade Croatian President Franjo Tudjman to rescind his order requiring United Nations forces to leave his country after March 31, but it declined to provide details. In testimony before Congress, Assistant Secretary of State Richard C. Holbrooke said he has just completed the first round of "a very intense dialogue" with the Croatians and plans to return to Zagreb this weekend.
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