Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Foreign Relations Cyprus
IN THE NEWS

United States Foreign Relations Cyprus

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Conceding defeat in his effort to restart talks on reunifying this divided island, U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke said the Turkish Cypriots' unacceptable demands made a "meaningful exchange" impossible. After three days of shuttling between Turkish and Greek Cypriot leaders, Holbrooke said he had given up for now. "I'll be back any time I can be useful and both sides want me," he told a news conference before leaving. Lower-level U.S. mediation will resume later this month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by the announcement that long-divided and occasionally warring Greek and Turkish Cypriots had agreed to resume talks intended to bring about their reconciliation, President Clinton began a daunting 10-day mission Sunday to promote democracy and political stability in Europe's troubled southeastern corner.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 2, 1988
President George Vassiliou of Cyprus appealed to President Reagan to persuade Turkey to withdraw its troops and Turkish settlers from the divided Mediterranean island. Emerging from a meeting at the White House with the President, Vassiliou told reporters the solution to the Cyprus problem "depends on the implementation of principles the United States believes in. That means no foreign troops should be in the country and human rights should be implemented."
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Conceding defeat in his effort to restart talks on reunifying this divided island, U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke said the Turkish Cypriots' unacceptable demands made a "meaningful exchange" impossible. After three days of shuttling between Turkish and Greek Cypriot leaders, Holbrooke said he had given up for now. "I'll be back any time I can be useful and both sides want me," he told a news conference before leaving. Lower-level U.S. mediation will resume later this month.
NEWS
October 14, 1989
Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash met Friday with Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, but both the State Department and the Greek Cypriot government denied any shift toward recognition of the self-declared state. The officials stressed the informal nature of the meeting, held over lunch in a State Department dining room.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by the announcement that long-divided and occasionally warring Greek and Turkish Cypriots had agreed to resume talks intended to bring about their reconciliation, President Clinton began a daunting 10-day mission Sunday to promote democracy and political stability in Europe's troubled southeastern corner.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Glafcos Clerides of Cyprus appealed to President Clinton on Friday to pledge U.S. action, including the possible use of military force, to guarantee the independence of the strategically located Mediterranean island if its Greek and Turkish communities agree on reunification after almost 19 years of division. With Clinton already agonizing over his inability to stop the dismemberment of Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Administration gave a wary reception to the proposal.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tiny shops off Ledra Street in the heart of Nicosia's ancient walled city seemed an unlikely battlefield this week in the American trade war on international piracy. Unsold inflatable Santas still dangled from outdoor sales racks beside postcards of topless sun worshipers on the beaches of this eastern Mediterranean island. Innocent shawls of Cypriot lace adorned the walls inside, and souvenir ashtrays lined the shelves.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tiny shops off Ledra Street in the heart of Nicosia's ancient walled city seemed an unlikely battlefield this week in the American trade war on international piracy. Unsold inflatable Santas still dangled from outdoor sales racks beside postcards of topless sun worshipers on the beaches of this eastern Mediterranean island. Innocent shawls of Cypriot lace adorned the walls inside, and souvenir ashtrays lined the shelves.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Glafcos Clerides of Cyprus appealed to President Clinton on Friday to pledge U.S. action, including the possible use of military force, to guarantee the independence of the strategically located Mediterranean island if its Greek and Turkish communities agree on reunification after almost 19 years of division. With Clinton already agonizing over his inability to stop the dismemberment of Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Administration gave a wary reception to the proposal.
NEWS
October 14, 1989
Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash met Friday with Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, but both the State Department and the Greek Cypriot government denied any shift toward recognition of the self-declared state. The officials stressed the informal nature of the meeting, held over lunch in a State Department dining room.
NEWS
August 2, 1988
President George Vassiliou of Cyprus appealed to President Reagan to persuade Turkey to withdraw its troops and Turkish settlers from the divided Mediterranean island. Emerging from a meeting at the White House with the President, Vassiliou told reporters the solution to the Cyprus problem "depends on the implementation of principles the United States believes in. That means no foreign troops should be in the country and human rights should be implemented."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|