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January 12, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, a leader known for thinking great thoughts on weekend retreats, was shown the sights of this history-steeped capital Tuesday night by a different sort of Renaissance man, Czech President Vaclav Havel.
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NEWS
November 18, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY and IVA DRAPALOVA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Czech anti-chemical warfare unit that gained recognition for its work during the Persian Gulf War is preparing to take part in the U.S.-led campaign against terrorism. Plans to deploy the unit, which specializes in the detection of nerve agents and the decontamination of troops and equipment, were announced this month by Czech Defense Minister Jaroslav Tvrdik.
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NEWS
September 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Czech President Vaclav Havel, the dissident playwright who was a leader in the "Velvet Revolution" that returned democracy to his country, took up Europe's complicated future Wednesday with President Clinton. He dismissed moves in Russia to return to some state controls as not alarming. "I don't see anything very dangerous in it," he said. Havel, 61, apparently is on the mend after months of serious medical problems.
NEWS
September 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Czech President Vaclav Havel, the dissident playwright who was a leader in the "Velvet Revolution" that returned democracy to his country, took up Europe's complicated future Wednesday with President Clinton. He dismissed moves in Russia to return to some state controls as not alarming. "I don't see anything very dangerous in it," he said. Havel, 61, apparently is on the mend after months of serious medical problems.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The street-side entrance to Jaroslava Martinkova's apartment building is difficult to miss. The foggy glass doors keep passersby from gazing inside, but her name appears plainly on the doorbell panel, second from the bottom in a column of 10. Yet when New York attorney Lawrence Molnar came searching for Martinkova shortly after the fall of communism, he walked by the six-story building--blackened by years of chimneys spewing soot into the wintry Prague sky--three times before ringing the bell.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY and IVA DRAPALOVA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Czech anti-chemical warfare unit that gained recognition for its work during the Persian Gulf War is preparing to take part in the U.S.-led campaign against terrorism. Plans to deploy the unit, which specializes in the detection of nerve agents and the decontamination of troops and equipment, were announced this month by Czech Defense Minister Jaroslav Tvrdik.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The street-side entrance to Jaroslava Martinkova's apartment building is difficult to miss. The foggy glass doors keep passersby from gazing inside, but her name appears plainly on the doorbell panel, second from the bottom in a column of 10. Yet when New York attorney Lawrence Molnar came searching for Martinkova shortly after the fall of communism, he walked by the six-story building--blackened by years of chimneys spewing soot into the wintry Prague sky--three times before ringing the bell.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, a leader known for thinking great thoughts on weekend retreats, was shown the sights of this history-steeped capital Tuesday night by a different sort of Renaissance man, Czech President Vaclav Havel.
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