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NEWS
May 11, 1992
MIXED REVIEWS: Ambassador Shirley Temple Black comes home this summer after three years in Czechoslovakia, where she was a hit with the people--but didn't escape criticism. . . . "With that name and being American ambassador, how could she not be popular?" asked one Prague resident. But critics complain that Black, who arrived just before the 1989 upheaval, never caught up to the new conditions. . . .
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NEWS
May 11, 1992
MIXED REVIEWS: Ambassador Shirley Temple Black comes home this summer after three years in Czechoslovakia, where she was a hit with the people--but didn't escape criticism. . . . "With that name and being American ambassador, how could she not be popular?" asked one Prague resident. But critics complain that Black, who arrived just before the 1989 upheaval, never caught up to the new conditions. . . .
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NEWS
February 7, 1990
Recent accounts about Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega freeing U.S. funds for poll monitors for the upcoming elections on Feb. 25 was indeed good news. By allowing the Bush Administration, handpicked U.S. members of Congress and the anti-Sandinista coalition (UNO) to monitor all polling places, Ortega has assured that the elections will be certifiable by the entire world and in the best interest of all Nicaraguan people.
SPORTS
November 11, 1991 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The slight accents reveal European roots and lend charm to the words of Marianna and Eva Kristofik as they recount perhaps the greatest adventure of their young lives. The sisters, who are the No. 3 doubles tennis team at Savanna High School, were born in two different towns in the Slovakia region of Czechoslovakia and came to Anaheim with their parents in January, 1986. How they got here wasn't exactly orthodox. "We went to Italy on a vacation and just didn't go back," said Marianna, 18.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another dramatic symbol of the armistice in the Cold War, Secretary of State James A. Baker III will appear before a Soviet parliamentary committee to answer questions next week when he visits Moscow, it was announced Friday. The unprecedented appearance by an American secretary of state in the witness chair of the International Affairs Committee of the Supreme Soviet parallels the visit last year of Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an unmistakable, if slightly unsettling, exhibition of the torrid velocity of political development in the Eastern Bloc, a Czechoslovakian campaign manager greeted Hollywood this week--right there in Jane Fonda's living room, at that most refined of California political functions: The chic fund-raiser.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will visit Czechoslovakia next month to signal growing U.S. support for the new government's shift from communism to democracy, officials disclosed Friday. Baker, who is going to Moscow on Feb. 4 for talks with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, also is considering stops in Romania and Bulgaria, the U.S. officials said. The Bush Administration is in the midst of working out a program to lower U.S.
SPORTS
September 6, 1988
A congressional bid to grant tennis star Ivan Lendl immediate U.S. citizenship so he could play on the U.S. Olympic team failed because Czechoslovakian officials refused to provide waivers for him, lawmakers said.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Ladislav Adamec announced Tuesday that Czechoslovak citizens will no longer need exit permits to travel to Western countries, a move that signaled the first significant reverberations here from East Germany's decision last week to open its borders to the West.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Officials of the United States and Czechoslovakia signed a trade agreement Thursday, the second economic pact negotiated with an Eastern European nation since last year's political upheaval. The new accord is one of the steps needed to cut tariffs on Czech products sold in the United States. The document also seeks to foster increased business ties and tourism between the two nations. U.S. Trade Representative Carla A.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Associated Press and TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Visiting Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel on Wednesday accepted from Congress the 1918 first draft of his country's declaration of independence, calling it "the birth certificate" of his fledgling government. Standing before a portrait of George Washington at the Capitol, Havel received the document from House and Senate leaders. The document had been safeguarded for four decades by the Library of Congress while Czechoslovakia was under Communist rule.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the aborted coup in Moscow, the Polish and Czechoslovak militaries traded intelligence data with Western forces on the readiness of 300,000 Soviet troops in eastern Germany, fearful that they might try to fight their way home to help the plotters, East European sources said Friday. As it turned out, no major Soviet military units in Germany or in the East European border region made preparations to move.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American business could gain the inside track in the race among foreign companies to invest in Czechoslovakia as it speeds toward a free-market economy. Americans have a big advantage: Czechoslovakia's leaders see the United States as the free-market leader with the financial resources to help usher their nation into a new economic era.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuba's low-level diplomatic mission to Washington, technically a tenant of the Czechoslovak Embassy since 1977, received an eviction notice Wednesday. The move could force Cuba to find another sponsor or lose its only official contact with the United States. But, in yet another sign of how much the world has changed in the last year, the hard-line Communist nation may find that it has few allies willing to sponsor its interests section.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
It was almost as though the White House staff was determined to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. On Saturday, in Prague, Czechoslovakia, President Bush spoke to the largest such crowd in his presidency--more than 100,000 enthusiastic Czechs and Slovaks. It was a triumphal appearance by any standard and doubly welcome for an American President burdened with declining ratings in public opinion polls.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaving behind a nation deeply divided over the prospect of war in the Persian Gulf, President Bush arrived here Saturday looking for a receptive audience for his message that "the freedom of people everywhere remains under threat" from the aggression of Iraq. Czechoslovakia, Bush noted, was among the first victims of Nazi aggression in the 1930s and of Soviet aggression a decade later.
NEWS
May 21, 1988 | Associated Press
President Gustav Husak has ratified an agreement to allow Americans to monitor the withdrawal of Soviet Bloc intermediate-range nuclear missiles, the Communist daily Rude Pravo reported. The agreement with the Soviet Union and East Germany allows the United States to make about 400 inspections in the three Warsaw Pact countries, Rude Pravo said Thursday. The Soviet Union began withdrawing some medium-range and shorter-range nuclear missiles from Czechoslovakia and East Germany in March.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cuba's low-level diplomatic mission to Washington, technically a tenant of the Czechoslovak Embassy since 1977, received an eviction notice Wednesday. The move could force Cuba to find another sponsor or lose its only official contact with the United States. But, in yet another sign of how much the world has changed in the last year, the hard-line Communist nation may find that it has few allies willing to sponsor its interests section.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | From Reuters
Barbara Bush on Saturday shared the secrets of a dog's life in the White House with Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel's wife, Olga, and schoolchildren. In a quick tour of Prague during President Bush's one-day visit to Czechoslovakia, Mrs. Bush and Olga Havlova visited pupils at an English-language school. Mrs. Bush read excerpts from a book written in the name of her dog, Millie, to the schoolchildren. "Look at that," Mrs.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush will spend Thanksgiving Day with U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf, the White House announced Friday. Bush, who will leave Washington on Nov. 16 at the start of an eight-day trip to Europe and the Middle East, will also meet in Egypt with President Hosni Mubarak and in Saudi Arabia with King Fahd, the Saudi monarch, and the exiled emir of Kuwait, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah.
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