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July 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Ending what he proclaimed a "historic week in Europe," President Clinton turned toward foreign policy challenges at home Saturday, including the possibility of a longer U.S. mission in Bosnia and questions about the costs of expanding NATO. Ten of thousands of Danes cheered Clinton during his visit to Denmark, the first by a U.S. president. Copenhagen was the last stop on an eight-day trip that took Clinton from Spain to Poland, Romania and Denmark.
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NEWS
July 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Ending what he proclaimed a "historic week in Europe," President Clinton turned toward foreign policy challenges at home Saturday, including the possibility of a longer U.S. mission in Bosnia and questions about the costs of expanding NATO. Ten of thousands of Danes cheered Clinton during his visit to Denmark, the first by a U.S. president. Copenhagen was the last stop on an eight-day trip that took Clinton from Spain to Poland, Romania and Denmark.
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NEWS
April 23, 1988 | From Reuters
President Reagan's press spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater, apologized to Denmark on Friday for an earlier comment that offended some Danes. At a White House press conference on Wednesday, Fitzwater was asked to comment on a Danish election measure to tighten curbs on U.S. ships taking nuclear arms into Danish ports. "Danish means breakfast to me," Fitzwater replied to laughter, in a reference to the sweet pastries that many Americans eat with their morning coffee.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The defense ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization expressed "widespread concern" here Thursday at a resolution of the Danish Parliament that would make it difficult for U.S. or British ships carrying nuclear weapons to enter Danish ports. "Ministers made it abundantly clear that no one wished to interfere in the affairs of a sovereign member country of the alliance," said the NATO secretary general, Lord Carrington, after a two-day meeting here.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Calling Denmark's new policy on nuclear weapons carried by visiting ships a "real problem," Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Monday urged that small NATO nation to accept the responsibilities as well as the benefits of the alliance that has kept the peace in Europe for four decades. Earlier this month, the Danish Parliament adopted an opposition resolution that tightened the nation's ban on nuclear weapons and provoked a domestic political crisis.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz rebuked Denmark on Sunday for spending only 2% of its gross national product on defense and warned that a proposed Baltic nuclear free zone cannot protect the area from Soviet missiles. Shultz chided the Danish government in response to a question by a Danish journalist before flying on to Norway for meetings today with senior Norwegian officials.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The defense ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization expressed "widespread concern" here Thursday at a resolution of the Danish Parliament that would make it difficult for U.S. or British ships carrying nuclear weapons to enter Danish ports. "Ministers made it abundantly clear that no one wished to interfere in the affairs of a sovereign member country of the alliance," said the NATO secretary general, Lord Carrington, after a two-day meeting here.
NEWS
April 26, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Calling Denmark's new policy on nuclear weapons carried by visiting ships a "real problem," Secretary of State George P. Shultz on Monday urged that small NATO nation to accept the responsibilities as well as the benefits of the alliance that has kept the peace in Europe for four decades. Earlier this month, the Danish Parliament adopted an opposition resolution that tightened the nation's ban on nuclear weapons and provoked a domestic political crisis.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | From Reuters
President Reagan's press spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater, apologized to Denmark on Friday for an earlier comment that offended some Danes. At a White House press conference on Wednesday, Fitzwater was asked to comment on a Danish election measure to tighten curbs on U.S. ships taking nuclear arms into Danish ports. "Danish means breakfast to me," Fitzwater replied to laughter, in a reference to the sweet pastries that many Americans eat with their morning coffee.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz rebuked Denmark on Sunday for spending only 2% of its gross national product on defense and warned that a proposed Baltic nuclear free zone cannot protect the area from Soviet missiles. Shultz chided the Danish government in response to a question by a Danish journalist before flying on to Norway for meetings today with senior Norwegian officials.
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