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United States Foreign Relations East Germany

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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Big Four victors of World War II and the two halves of defeated Germany agreed here Tuesday to begin historic talks "shortly" to reunify Germany and to discuss the security concerns of neighboring states. After a frenetic day of bilateral talks among their foreign ministers, the six nations issued a brief statement that, however vague, begins a process that will finally lead to a peace settlement with Germany 45 years after the end of the war.
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NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaves skittered across the quiet streets of East Berlin's Karlshorst district on the autumn day that would be East Germany's last, and anticipation filled the air. It was Oct. 2, 1990, a day before Germany was to become united for the first time since the end of World War II, and Karlshorst, like all of Germany, was preparing for the party of the century. Deep inside one nondescript Karlshorst house, however, the Cold War was still very much underway.
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NEWS
February 15, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush expressed surprise Wednesday that the Soviet Union had withdrawn its strong opposition to the U.S.-backed reunification talks of the two German states and permitted "a major breakthrough" in the process. "This surprised me that they (the Soviets) were willing to make an agreement on that," Bush said. "I mean to be very elated about . . . the fact that the Secretary (of State James A.
NEWS
November 11, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state judge convicted Berkeley-educated sociologist Jeffrey Schevitz of spying for East Germany during the Cold War, rejecting the American professor's elaborate, sometimes tearful claims that he had spied at the behest of the CIA and had always been loyal to the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1990 | TED JOHNSON
Standing in the lobby of the Crystal Cathedral, Lutheran Pastor Jenz Heil of East Germany marveled at the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's achievement. Heil, who heads a modest church of 100 active members in the town of Helma, dreams of building his own "mega-church" now that communist barriers to religious freedom have started to come down.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials, who last month were highly skeptical of East German leader Egon Krenz's willingness to yield to democratic pressures, are now hopeful that his relaxed travel policy will be the first step in a series of broader reforms. "We've had some promising indications, namely the announced intention by the authorities to liberalize foreign travel," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration watched East Germany's elections on Sunday with a mixture of elation and apprehension: elation over the clear mandate the conservative landslide gave to unification with the West, combined with nagging worries over the pitfalls that may lie ahead. Publicly, the Administration's reaction was diplomatically bland. "The United States welcomes today's parliamentary elections in the German Democratic Republic," White House spokeswoman Alixe Glen said.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the price of reassuring Moscow that it has nothing to fear from a united Germany remaining in NATO, the United States is prepared to accept the presence of a large body of Soviet troops in the eastern sector of the new nation for several years, a senior American diplomat reiterated here Wednesday. The Soviet Union insists that a united Germany should be neutral territory. Soviet troops may have to stay in East Germany for three to five years, U.S.
NEWS
June 11, 1988 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Deputy Secretary of State John C. Whitehead said Friday that economic reform in Eastern Europe would create a more stable and peaceful East-West relationship. Whitehead, the No. 2 man in the U.S. State Department, said that "we in the West are heartened by the economic reforms under discussion in a number of Eastern countries." "We encourage stronger and bolder steps," he added. "We want the drive for greater economic openness in the East to succeed."
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronald Reagan took a chisel to a remnant of the Berlin Wall on Wednesday and strolled into formerly Communist East Berlin on a visit heavy with symbolism, drawing tears and shouts of "Thank you!" for his role in liberating the East. The former President and his wife, Nancy, were cheered by thousands as they traced the scarred path left by the wall, a hated symbol of East-West confrontation that is fast disappearing as Germany reunites and Europe recovers from 40 years of division.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lothar de Maiziere, the first and almost certainly the last East German prime minister to visit the White House, met Monday with President Bush and, in a symbolic effort to reassure American Jews, presented the keystone of what was once the largest synagogue in Europe. The gift will be placed in the U.S. Holocaust Museum planned for Washington.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | Reuters
Prime Minister Lothar de Maiziere embarks on the first official visit by an East German leader to the United States on Saturday. The White House dropped an entry ban on East German leaders after East Germany fired its Stalinist elite, embraced democratic unification with West Germany and atoned for its Nazi past. De Maiziere will meet World Jewish Congress leaders and U.N.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a day heavy with history and rich in optimism, the principal World War II powers came together Saturday to plan the reunification of Germany and the beginning of a new European order.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, meeting for the third time in just over a month, restored some momentum to superpower arms control talks Friday, although they failed to resolve remaining disputes over cruise missiles and other topics, U.S. officials said. A senior U.S. official used the terms "serious" and "constructive" to describe the nuclear arms control segment of the three-hour meeting.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the price of reassuring Moscow that it has nothing to fear from a united Germany remaining in NATO, the United States is prepared to accept the presence of a large body of Soviet troops in the eastern sector of the new nation for several years, a senior American diplomat reiterated here Wednesday. The Soviet Union insists that a united Germany should be neutral territory. Soviet troops may have to stay in East Germany for three to five years, U.S.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, meeting for the third time in just over a month, restored some momentum to superpower arms control talks Friday, although they failed to resolve remaining disputes over cruise missiles and other topics, U.S. officials said. A senior U.S. official used the terms "serious" and "constructive" to describe the nuclear arms control segment of the three-hour meeting.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of East Germans flooded into West Berlin and West Germany on Saturday in the second weekend exodus of visitors since the borders were thrown open by East Germany's new reformist leaders. As people streamed out of East Germany for the weekend, the new Cabinet of Prime Minister Hans Modrow was sworn in.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration watched East Germany's elections on Sunday with a mixture of elation and apprehension: elation over the clear mandate the conservative landslide gave to unification with the West, combined with nagging worries over the pitfalls that may lie ahead. Publicly, the Administration's reaction was diplomatically bland. "The United States welcomes today's parliamentary elections in the German Democratic Republic," White House spokeswoman Alixe Glen said.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A little more than four months ago, the Rev. Markus Meckel was summoning dissidents to meetings in dank church basements in East Germany, planning nonviolent marches in hope of spurring his country's Communist regime toward reform.
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